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Why would a black hole grow in size???

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posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 10:14 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

I think about this stuff often and to be honest it baffles me.
Even Quantum Mechanics, discrete as it is, uses complex numbers to arrive at it's discrete solutions.
Riemann's formula for the number of primes less than a given number is mind blowing.

And your use of the word "emerging" is perfect.

We started with the counting numbers and then from those more mathematics emerged. Even/Odd numbers. Rational Numbers. Negative numbers, real numbers, complex numbers. Amazing all that emerged from counting numbers.





edit on 20-3-2018 by Deluxe because: Adding more.




posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: Golantrevize

It is possible the medium the black hole sits upon or space loses density in the area surrounding it as the black hole absorbs more matter around it.
This could cause fluctuations upon the black holes event horizon that could contract or expand it...



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:38 PM
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Visualize the space medium is like jello and the black holes like heated little spheres within the jello medium. And as the black holes heat up from feeding the black holes melt or vaporize the jello medium allowing for more expansion until more space material refills the area after adjusting to the black holes activities.



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

I disagree. It does not have a real value and therefore it's not real. It just basically means more than you can count. Which is why infinity+infinity=infinity. In calculus they talk about limits of functions as they approach infinity. They never actually reach infinity. It's pretty much a way of saying it's up to you how precise you want to make the calculation; 0.99999 or 0.9999999 until your calculator runs out of space. In the real world things do have an exact value and that calculation would end somewhere.



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: dumpaling

Well you can argue with Cantor all you want! I think Dedekind is smarter than I am in this subject too. So go for it! And good luck!

The 0.999 stuff is a mistake that people make when they don’t know math and the difference between the continuous and the “ruler math” that you learn in second grade. Even “clock math” (modulus arithmetic) screws with people’s understanding of how math works.

It is OK to not believe something. But I will tell you that the world will pass you by. A couple hundred years of applied math can’t be wrong regardless of what you think about infinity.

Think about it. Why is dividing by zero wrong??

The answer is, because any number from all possible numbers can be used to get the answer. That is the definition of infinity (i.e., it is not just “counting numbers”).



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 01:05 AM
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a reply to: Deluxe

I believe that if the Greeks had access to 16th century algebra then I would have never had to be asked certain questions on the SAT!!

You nailed too! Even/odd is one of the keys. It will unravel the number line in a way no one has seen. And maybe a few more math questions!




posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 01:31 AM
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originally posted by: Golantrevize
If the density is already infinite inside the eventhorizon then why would it get bigger in size by absorbing more matter? Also ive been reading about the bh in ngc 1277 that is the size of neptunes orbit and the mass of 17 billions suns and if a bh starts with the size of a city then how can it grow so much and why would it even grow if density is already infinite there is no reason to grow in size to accomodate more matter? Maybe i just dont get how bh work. Thx fir answering me


We do not know the actual size of a black hole...maybe they are all one atom in size...but we do know the event horizon will grow...



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 05:20 AM
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originally posted by: Golantrevize
a reply to: SeekAnswers

Thats the point if my question tho, something with infinite density would not need to grow bigger in size no matter what you throw at it since its already at infinite density a black hole the size of a golfball or the size of the sun should be able to absorb the entire universe without growing in size


I don't think black holes have infinite density, I just believe they are very dense, with possibly a singularity at the core, or the core could be molten like a planet. Mass or matter is a real material, it has volume.



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 06:08 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: dumpaling

Nah. The idea is that a singularity has no radius, no volume. So, to derive mass one would be dividing a number (mass) by 0 (volume).

That's not allowed. The result is undefined. That is not the same as infinite.

I disagree. The reason it's "not allowed" or "undefined" is exactly because it's infinite (or at least approaches infinity, in our limited scope of understanding).

Do an experiment: divide any number by a divisor that is less than 1 but greater than zero (for example, 0.5). Note the result. Then divide the same number by half the previous divisor (0.25 in this example), and note the result. Keep halving the divisor, and you will see that, as the divisor approaches zero, the result approaches infinity.

Ergo, dividing a number by zero equals infinity.



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Your speaking of infinity as a number that can be approached.
1/x as x approached zero is divergent and has no limit.



posted on Mar, 24 2018 @ 03:36 AM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

I don't even think you understand what you're saying. If 10/0=infinity and 11/0=infinity then clearly infinity ≠ infinity...infinity can have many different values,...it's not something you can quantify.If you want to talk about definitions we can start with the definition of a number:

"an arithmetical value, expressed by a word, symbol, or figure, representing a particular quantity and used in counting and making calculations and for showing order in a series or for identification"

Infinity does not represent any particular quantity, as I've already established, and therefore is not a number.



posted on Mar, 24 2018 @ 11:11 PM
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a reply to: dumpaling

I agree. This is why i hate the infinity symbol used in mathematics equations. It gives csome people a false perception that infinity is a number that can be used in regular mathematic expressions.
Infinity = Infinity +1 for example.
It's nonsense.



posted on Mar, 25 2018 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: Deluxe
Infinity isn't a number, it's a result. I can understand people struggling with the concept or rejecting it outright, but to me personally it's as clear as 1+1=2.

There's no need to try to quantify infinity. It just is.




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