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Why does the moon stop moving right at Totality of a complete Solar Eclipse?

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posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

it is an illusuion - the easiest way to demonstrate this is :

the eclipse is only seen from a slender ribbon of the earths surface for a brief time - does the moon appear to " stop " when viewed from a location outside the path of totality ???? or at any other time ????

unless you have some " magic " delusion of lunar cosmology - the notion of it " stopping " is absurd




posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:34 PM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
a reply to: CircleofFloss

It doesn't stop moving. Here is a lengthy thread by someone else with the same false assumption, and with numerous succinct explanations as to why that assumption is incorrect.

Try searching before you post.

I don't know about you, but the day-old n00b OP's writing style in this thread and the banned OP in that thread are pretty spot on to me.

It's safe to assume vexing people for kicks is going on here.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:43 PM
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Wat!!!!!


Is this a real question?
Maybe you should ask someone you know questions before posting.

Sorry dude ..
edit on 10-12-2017 by MorpheusUSA because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

I simply assume you are seeing the shadow of the moon not the outline of the moon which depending on angle can account for the time if any. This makes it seem to stop but it is the way the suns rays are dispersed aside from brightness on either side making it seem to stop. which has been better explained in a previous post.


edit on 10-12-2017 by randomthoughts12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: Cutepants

I can give you the first part until 51:30. I expanded the video and could still see it moving. common sense says it has to keep moving because it wouldn't make sense any other way. but then for it to seemingly change direction by a whole 90 degrees before moving out of the path of the sun after even a half a minute i'm still at a loss for.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: randomthoughts12

but pressed up right against the sun like that there's no difference between the shadow of the moon and the moon itself



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

well, yeah, it is absurd, but there we see it.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss
To our eyes, cameras and the math of it all I bet its highly likely the right angle to make it seem to stop but it indeed does not.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: randomthoughts12

one would think so, but whereas I may have accepted the answer provided in the other thread, it still makes no sense because:

the sun moves from east to west, as does the moon

yet the eclipse happened from west to east.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

Right, I'm not sure why that is. Maybe because of irregularities in the shape of the moon.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 06:06 PM
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The video projector malfunctioned for a couple of minutes during that eclipse. Have patients, the new guy running the sky projector isn't that experienced at it yet. He used to be guarding the gate of Hell, but now he got a promotion to projection.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: CircleofFloss
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

all good questions. maybe those distances aren't enough to matter. I'm not claiming to know the answer, just putting out the question. But when you watch this video, you'll see it stop



from 50 mins on

Of course the distances don't matter. That wasn't the point.

The point is that a totaly eclipse is not a "one instant" thing. Th eclipse occurs at different times for different people. So which are those times is that thayt you are claiming the moon actually stops?

Considering this happens for everyone seeing a local totality (so it happens over a whole range of times, not just once), it seems logical that it would only be an illusion for the person seeing their own personal local totality.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 06:31 PM
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originally posted by: CircleofFloss
a reply to: seasonal

the videos that I've seen of the great solar eclipse of 2017 sure looked like it stopped moving for almost 2 minutes.


Seeing the Eclipse personally I can tell you that it definitely does not stop moving at all.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

that's certainly logical. I can only speak of what's shown in the video. I don't know what everybody sees, do you?



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: imthegoat

it doesn't remain at totality for a certain period of time? then it must not have been a total solar eclipse and those that claim they're the same size are lying to you.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 06:57 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
a reply to: CircleofFloss

It doesn't stop moving. Here is a lengthy thread by someone else with the same false assumption, and with numerous succinct explanations as to why that assumption is incorrect.

Try searching before you post.

I don't know about you, but the day-old n00b OP's writing style in this thread and the banned OP in that thread are pretty spot on to me.

It's safe to assume vexing people for kicks is going on here.


Yep they are, and yet another OP who will not take any explanation given to them, even when its backed by fact.

Its irritating when people ask questions to get answers and then reject every answer with flawed logic and a clear lack of knowledge.

If you dont want an answer, dont ask the damn question.

Your query was answered on this thread you authored in may Intersting same arguments and writing style
edit on 10-12-2017 by SailorJerry because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: CircleofFloss
a reply to: imthegoat

it doesn't remain at totality for a certain period of time? then it must not have been a total solar eclipse and those that claim they're the same size are lying to you.



Depends on the geographic location of the observer. It moves, but the moons movement in relation to the earths makes it seems stationary at some point. Totality lasts anywhere between 10-20 seconds to almost 3 minutes.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: CircleofFloss
Why does the moon stop moving for a good few minutes before moving on its way?
The obvious answer is that the Moon does not stop. This can easily be proven with a telescope that has tracking software. The Moon has its own motion in orbit around the Earth, which makes an eclipse possible. Using such a telescope you will have to manually adjust for this motion by the Moon. These telescopes track the motion of the Earth, so stars will stay in view, but do not track the motion of the Moon. With the proper equipment you could observe this steady motion during an eclipse.

The Moon is not exactly the same size as the sun perspective wise like Soylent Green Is People has pointed out. This means that eclipses last longer and shorter depending on the position of the Moon. The distance the Moon is from the Earth changes. When the Moon is closer, during an eclipse, it appears larger and thus we see a longer totality time. The opposite occurs when the Moon is farther away.

Solar eclipses vary in time.

Take a look at the shadow cast by an eclipse.
NASA
Notice how large an area the shadow covers? It takes time for this shadow to move across your location but from your perspective nothing appears to change. If the Moon were transparent then you could see the different apparent sizes between the Sun and Moon, they are not exactly the same size.

What you see during totality is the Sun's corona which is not a solid surface that is fixed. It is an atmosphere of plasma that is several million kilometers above the surface of the Sun. All of this added together creates the illusion that the Moon stops during totality.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: Devino

well that picture from Nasa sure looks real and not fake at all, so that's got to be something. and pretty sure all that you wrote sounds pretty good and should also add up to exactly as you claimed at the end, that it gives us the appearance of stoppage. that or you didn't quite say anything I guess.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: imthegoat

boy that's a long time to have the moon stop, don't you think?



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