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Why does the moon stop moving right at Totality of a complete Solar Eclipse?

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posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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Is this the right forum for this question?

I'm sure there are members here who have seen a full solar eclipse or at least watched videos of it on Youtube.

Why does the moon stop moving for a good few minutes before moving on its way?




posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

I don't think the moon ever stops moving. It lines up with things and moves slowly past, like in an eclipse.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:43 PM
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It doesn’t.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

It doesn’t. It just appears to, briefly, due to the Earths and Moons rotation and motion while going around the Sun.


+7 more 
posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

Because that's when they resupply the secret Nazi moonbase one the bright side of the moon. They need a couple minutes.
edit on 10-12-2017 by Cutepants because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

the videos that I've seen of the great solar eclipse of 2017 sure looked like it stopped moving for almost 2 minutes.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:46 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

then what's the explanation that it moves and then appears not to for almost 2 minutes during the 2017 eclipse?



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:47 PM
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clearly the sky is fake



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:48 PM
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originally posted by: CircleofFloss
a reply to: TerryDon79

then what's the explanation that it moves and then appears not to for almost 2 minutes during the 2017 eclipse?


Video editing to slow it down and feed to people as some sort of proof of something stupid.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:55 PM
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not sure why it does this...
whats your theory?



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss
When the moon is moving across the sun, you know it's moving because you can see the gradually diminishing sun.
When the moon is covering the sun, you can't see its movement because your "movement indicator" has disappeared.
It hasn't ceased to move, but you don't have anything to compare it with.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: autopat51

I have no theory that's scientific that I like, and I've been working on formulating one for a long time now. Even though my first thread here at ATS using this account was about proving simulation theory, I don't like simulation theory lol But this would be another case for it.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

sure you do, you know when it's completely covering the sun and for how long by seeing when it moves again.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

You can see how long it fully covers the sun, but you can't see how much it moves during that time.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss
All that shows is that the moon is effectively covering the sun for longer than a split second of its movement across the sun's face. In other words, the "eclipse" is not a single point in space, but a length of X miles. As long as the moon is travelling through those X Miles, you can't detect the moon changing position, because you don't have anything visible to compare it with.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 04:11 PM
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and the sun is the exact size of the moon that is covering it.
wow, what are the odds.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 04:20 PM
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originally posted by: CircleofFloss
Is this the right forum for this question?

I'm sure there are members here who have seen a full solar eclipse or at least watched videos of it on Youtube.

Why does the moon stop moving for a good few minutes before moving on its way?


If you think about it. totality does not occur at one instant. Well, maybe to a single local observer it does, but totality occurs at different times for all of the different places that totality occurs.

Where I might be, I see totality at a certain time. A mile west of me, they saw it a few moments earlier. A mile east of me will see it a few moments after me. Someone 10 miles from me will see it occur minutes before. 100 miles from me might be 30+ minutes before me.

So....if you're right and the moon stops at totality, then for whose totality did it stop? Mine? The guy 10 miles away? What about the guy25 miles away, or maybe for the one a few hundred miles away?

It couldn't have stopped for all of us (i.e., EVERYONE), because that would mean it would never move. So, which of us were so lucky to have the moon stop for us during totality?


edit on 10/12/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 04:23 PM
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a reply to: CircleofFloss

You mean you're one of those that beleves in the moon?



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 04:24 PM
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So they can reset the simulation.



posted on Dec, 10 2017 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

sure you do, you know that the moon perfectly covers the sun because they appear to be the same size as each other. so when you see it completely cover the sun at totality, that's when it stops. then you just watch it start moving again. this is pretty simple, really. Kind of surprised I have to keep explaining it.



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