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Irreducible complexity and Evolution

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posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 04:29 PM
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originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: Phantom423

...There's a whole subsection on tinder and okcupid for hot chicks who are super into nerdy science guys who moonlight as musicians!


You got one thing right (i.e., one thing that is true in your sarcasm):
No matter how ugly a guy in a band is, or how plain a guy who plays a guitar is, chicks will dig him.

Not that YOU are necessarily ugly or plain (I don't even know you), but you get what I mean.



edit on 26/11/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

But why would we retire? I mean, as a stooge of Big Pharma I get all the respect I could ever need.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 07:06 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Well, playing in bands is how I met my wife!



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 07:12 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: peter vlar

But why would we retire? I mean, as a stooge of Big Pharma I get all the respect I could ever need.


That's a good point. Why leave when you can sit in your cushy corporate office with that sweet high backed leather chair grinning maniacally like Scrooge McDuck while you create pharmaceuticals filled with rat poison lithium and Fluoride to neuter the unsuspecting masses and ready them for the FEMA death camps.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

Exactly, and those patents I've helped write, those just write themselves
Just like my PhD thesis was all drinking, wenching, and going to the gym.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: Noinden



Ahhhh...those were the days weren't they?



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

Were? Don't you still have them now that you are a real scientist (tm)? I mean I don't have 18 hour days, dangerous chemicals, or clients who think they are god



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

Not anymore. Not unless I go back and collect another degree at least. I more or less crippled myself in the Army and physically can't do field work at this point and don't have the patience to teach andthere arent a lot of Pleistocene sites in upstate NY containing Neanderthal remains so I sit home, read my journals when they come in the mail, make the trip to NYC for the occasional conference or lecture if I find it interesting enough and keep up to date on as much as I can when I'm not slacking off. I didn't make it to 50 yet, so haven't collected my millions in bonus money for helping perpetuate the fraud of MES so I'm just hoping they're taking count of all the young minds I've forced into the oblivion of Hell and the damage i do on ATS haha



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

I did the go back and collect some extra letters to the end of my name. Honestly.... I was annoyed at the academics, and the students. I valued what I as doing, the academics seemed to be going through the motions, and the students were brats. I attribute this to being old. So I was glad to get back into the contract research organization world
Ever new project is a challenge, and scale up is fun.

I'm 5 years shy of 50 myself.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 09:31 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

I'll catch up with you in just over 6 months then. I just bought property in Maine so if I do some more collecting it will probably be after I move next year. I don't want to start something now and have to try to transfer or make a 7 hour commute to finish. I go back and forth and have been waffling on it for the past 3 years so sooner or later I'll have to do it just so I can say I did. My kids are all old enough that I'll have the time and ability to focus properly. I've been spending a lot of time in the Yucatan the last few years so that may be what I focus on and my other possible option is Bronze Age Mediterranean Civ so I'm not totally floundering, just not totally committed to on or the other.And they would be a slight left turn into Archaeology My other option is to go back and pick up some earlier research from the late 90's. As much as Svante Paabo has added to the field with his work in Neanderthal genomics, nobody has still tested at least one of my hypothesis and with the technology we have now, especially with PCR amplification, I may very well be able to pull it off so that's a very distinct possibility as well.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 09:36 PM
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originally posted by: dusty1
a reply to: whereislogic



Beware of the talisman called "Peer Reviewed"

This forum (and this thread as well, especially the latest commentary) always has good demonstrations of the behaviour and way of thinking described by Berlinski below (the latter as a myth) at 6:25 and 9:00.

edit on 26-11-2017 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 09:42 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: peter vlar

Exactly, and those patents I've helped write, those just write themselves
.


My body synthesizes relevant chemicals constantly throughout the day with very fine-tuned equilibrium mechanisms to ensure my biochemistry is in the goldi-locks zone at all times.

If you think you and your team making a chemical is cool and intelligent (which I think it is [I'm not being sarcastc]), try to fathom the immense complexity involved with creating all the transmitters, hormones, etc, involved with an entire functioning human being and creating the necessary receptors, epigenetic mechanisms, etc, that are involved with ensuring a well-orchestrated expression of all these chemicals.

When you smell food your body sends a signal to start releasing insulin - what electrician wired this feedback loop? If you propose random mutation created it, what came first - insulin, the DNA strand that codes for insulin, the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate insulin expression, or the receptors that detect insulin? You need all pieces in play, this is irreducible complexity.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: whereislogic


how cute, more videos, no data. Good to see you're consistent if nothing else.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

Oh so you can scale that up can you?

My job is to do what the client asks, in a safe efficient and repeatable manner. You should no that, as you claim to have a chemistry degree.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 10:13 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: cooperton

Oh so you can scale that up can you?

My job is to do what the client asks, in a safe efficient and repeatable manner. You should no that, as you claim to have a chemistry degree.


You must have misinterpreted my post.

You and a team of intelligent chemists made a chemical.

Your body is constantly creating a plethora of chemicals, proteins, etc to maintain life at all times. How do you suppose no intelligence was involved to make this machinery? Especially considering the intelligent effort it takes to synthesize one chemical in the lab.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

Hey take it easy on Noinden he's a chemist who does not understand or admit to the irreducible complexity of the biochemical processes of.... Oh.... The human eye let's say... Which if one of these process ceased or were never present wouldnt not work as well but wouldnt work at all... This according to the father of the lie of evolution himself entirely destroys his beliefs...

Charles Darwin on the origins of species page 158
" If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not be formed by numerous successive slight modifications my theory would ABSOLUTELY break down... But I can find out no such case."
lol
edit on 26-11-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar





The Big Bang didn't magically poof anything into existence. But that would require enough interest in the topic to actually read up on it to know that nobody in physics claims that there was nothing and then there was something.



Have you ever heard of Lawrence Krauss?



(post by 5StarOracle removed for a manners violation)

posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 01:24 AM
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How does perhaps the most efficient motor exist in bacterial flagellum with an energy conversion efficiency of almost 100%?
The flagellar motor is Capable of over 90000 rpm able to stop itself in a quarter turn and change direction and in another quarter turn be back at 90000 rpm...
The best proposal evolution can come up with is that these motors could have evolved and that things like sperm cells and bacteria once had no need for movement and or that these motors evolved into existence one piece at a time in precise sequence...
Impossible for natural selection to be an even remote possibility...
This is irreducable complexity...
These molecular machines were engineered to full functionality from the get go...
edit on 27-11-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 01:42 AM
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Now one could say that all the pieces prexisted but somehow came together except we know that these pieces of the molecular machines are made up of proteins which would need their shapes and chemical makeup also pre exist to fit together...
It's a really big stretch of the imagination to try and fathom this as even a remote possibility...
Once again the odds say it's virtually impossible...
And if that is not convincing enough the fact that they are self assembling should help convince you...
Because that means the cells are pre programmed...

edit on 27-11-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



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