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The Shed 16

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posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: PrairieShepherd

Hi Shep (forgive my half awake working brain)!

But I like your word better! So much more expressive



edit on 6-6-2017 by zosimov because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: zosimov


So much more expressive

I find that amusingly ironic considering it means "confused, bewildered"!



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: PrairieShepherd
a reply to: zosimov


So much more expressive

I find that amusingly ironic considering it means "confused, bewildered"!


huh?



I'd rather drop it than ancient greek in a conversation any day though. Even if it does bumfuzzle the recipient.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: zosimov

Agreed, though I imagine most would be bumfuzzled by kairos any day of the week, or twice on Sundays, unless they have gnossos regarding kairos in which case their bumfuzzlement may be alleviated.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:09 PM
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Hiya Zos!

LOL Now we have two words of the day!

That's ok Shep. Now Gordi may go easy on me.

Gordi, see, you have two words today instead of one and I didn't have to do a thing.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: PrairieShepherd
a reply to: zosimov

Agreed, though I imagine most would be bumfuzzled by kairos any day of the week, or twice on Sundays, unless they have gnossos regarding kairos in which case their bumfuzzlement may be alleviated.


OMG, now we have shed code words and new words and our foreign friends who speak some sort of English, but I'm not sure what kind. I'm beginning to feel like Alice in wonderland.




posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: PrairieShepherd

This is a truly applause-worthy response.


Nice to see you Night, glad to help- especially when it comes to words!!! (Plus I owe you for that crazy jelly donut mess I left that one day.. I did my best with the broom but for the record brooms don't do well on jelly. The pixies were incensed.)
edit on 6-6-2017 by zosimov because: spell



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

ROFL!!!!

You are so funny!!



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:17 PM
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originally posted by: zosimov
a reply to: Night Star

ROFL!!!!

You are so funny!!


So are you! LOL

Have to clean my little fish tanks and stuff. I'll be back.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

See you around, friend



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: shlaw
Unsure if he is hungry, thirsty, or just needs his litterbox
cleaned, Shlaw walks up and down the shed's hallways
yowling: "Meow...meow...meow...". Once everyone is
awake, he might take a well deserved nap.



URGENT UPDATE:

For all those concerned (everyone), Shlaw did indeed manage
to have a nap after waking the denizens of the shed. It went
well, save for a tense moment where Shlaw and a blanket had
a short kerfuffle over placement.

Thank you for your concern.

Meow.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: shlaw

Kerfluffle? I love that word! I didn't look it up to see if it's real, but I love it.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: zosimov
a reply to: Night Star

See you around, friend


Can you see me now? Jumps up and down waving her hands in the air.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: Night Star
a reply to: shlaw

Kerfluffle? I love that word! I didn't look it up to see if it's real, but I love it.



Fuffle was first used in Scottish English, as early as the 16th
century, as a verb meaning "to dishevel." The addition of the
prefix car- (possibly derived from a Scottish Gaelic word
meaning "wrong" or "awkward") didn't change the meaning of
the word considerably. In the 19th century carfuffle, with its
variant curfuffle, became a noun, and in the 20th century it
was embraced by a broader population of English speakers and
standardized to kerfuffle. There is some dispute among language
historians over how the altered spelling came to be favored.
One theory holds that it might have been influenced by imitative
words like kerplunk, where the syllable ker- is simply added
for emphasis.


Shlaw is not amused by being forced to look up Kerfuffle
himself. One cat scratch for you.



Meow!




edit on 6-6-2017 by shlaw because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: shlaw
ne theory holds that it might have been influenced by imitative
words like kerplunk, where the syllable ker- is simply added
for emphasis.

I always thought that kerplunk was an onomatopoeia! Fascinating...

Sorry! Word nerd here...



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: PrairieShepherd

originally posted by: shlaw
ne theory holds that it might have been influenced by imitative
words like kerplunk, where the syllable ker- is simply added
for emphasis.

I always thought that kerplunk was an onomatopoeia! Fascinating...

Sorry! Word nerd here...


might have been influenced...

Even the internets isn't sure of its own information.
*considers giving you one cat scratch... but you are
a fellow word nerd...*

Carry on wordsmith!

*sharpens claws in preparation for next infraction*




posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

It should be "kerfuffle" (without an "l", as shlaw correctly wrote), but otherwise, it's a well-known word to those who ummm... know it!
I've been using it for decades. The "ker" prefix is a device intended solely to add emphasis, just like "Ka-boom!" instead of merely "boom!" tends to do.

Meanwhile, hello, everyone.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: JustMike

Hi JustMike!
*waves*
Great to see you online! How are things in the country?



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: PrairieShepherd
Actually, it could function onomatopoeically.

For those who are wondering WTH we are on about, "onomatpoeia" (a handy Greek word), simply means a word that expresses a given sound, like "boom", "crrunch!", "ka-bannnng!" and so on.

The funny thing is that onomatopoeia is culturally- and language-specific. For example, Czech dogs say, "Haf" (pronounced "huff" for English-language readers), and what we'd write as "crunch!", Czechs write as "křup!", which is pronounced something like "krshoop!" (but not exactly).

So, in some cultural-linguistic systems, "ker-plunk" could well be onomatopoeic.



edit on 6/6/17 by JustMike because: I removed a superfluous "n" from a word. This is also called "fixing a typo".



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: JustMike
a reply to: PrairieShepherd
Actually, it could function onomatopoeically.

For those who are wondering WTH we are on about, "onomatpoeia" (a handy Greek word), simply means a word that expresses a given sound, like "boom", "crrunch!", "ka-bannnng!" and so on.

The funny thing is that ononmatopoeia is culturally- and language-specific. For example, Czech dogs say, "Haf" (pronounced "huff" for English-language readers), and what we'd write as "crunch!", Czechs write as "křup!", which is pronounced something like "krshoop!" (but not exactly).

So, in some cultural-linguistic systems, "ker-plunk" could well be onomatopoeic.




LOL
I remember reading some of those years ago.
Great stuff.




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