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Police arrest man they say was buying blood from people at vacant D.C. apartment

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posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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From WaPo

Blood business?

WTF?

What say you, ATS?




A 43-year-old man has been charged with paying people $30 to draw samples of their blood, which D.C. police said he was storing in “large quantities” in an abandoned apartment near Nationals Park in Southwest Washington.


Need help fixing the link..it's on Drudge

www.washingtonpost.com... 417b-11e7-adba-394ee67a7582_story.html?utm_term=.6805a0711c4c
edit on 26-5-2017 by iWontGiveUP because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-5-2017 by iWontGiveUP because: Edit



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edit on Fri May 26 2017 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: iWontGiveUP

Your link does not work.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:20 AM
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Washington Post

Here you go.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:20 AM
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Police arrest man they say was buying blood from people at vacant D.C. apartment A 43-year-old man has been charged with paying people $30 to draw samples of their blood, which D.C. police said he was storing in “large quantities” in an abandoned apartment near Nationals Park in Southwest Washington.

An arrest affidavit said police stumbled on the makeshift operation when a patrol officer saw people — many described in court documents as “habitual substance abusers” — congregating Wednesday afternoon in front of a three-story brick apartment building at P and First streets. The officer overheard some of them discussing being paid to give blood, according to the affidavit filed by the Office of the D.C. Attorney General, and went to investigate. The suspect, Khoa Hoang Nguyen, told police that he was doing work for a biomedical company “and that he was approved and certified to withdraw blood from citizens,” according to court papers. A woman at the apartment told police that she and Nguyen had drawn blood from 20 people that day, the documents state. They say that Nguyen had a ledger with an additional 205 names. Authorities said they were unable to corroborate Nguyen’s account.

The D.C. Health Department concluded that Nguyen had no medical license, according to the court documents. He was charged with one count of practicing registered nursing without a license. The woman was not charged and is listed as a witness in court documents. Khoa Hoang Nguyen declined to comment after his hearing as he was leaving the court Thursday May 25, 2017. (Keith Alexander/TWP) Nguyen, whose family came to the United States from Vietnam at the end of the Vietnam War in 1975, appeared Thursday for an initial appearance in D.C. Superior Court, where a judge ordered him released from custody. A hearing was set for June 23. The judge ordered Nguyen, of Rockville, Md., not to perform any medical procedures that require a license while on release on the misdemeanor charge. Nguyen was also ordered not to draw any blood from anyone. Nguyen declined to comment after the hearing. His court-appointed attorney, Lauckland Nicholas, also declined to speak on the specifics of the case. “We will just have to see what happens,” Nicholas said. “There is a presumption of innocence.” It was not immediately clear what Nguyen intended to do with the blood. Police said officers also confiscated used needles from the apartment in the public-housing complex. Court papers and authorities did not say how much blood was found or how it was being stored. Nguyen spent five years in prison after pleading guilty in 2010 to conspiracy to distribute drugs after an FBI raid on a doctor’s office he worked at in Falls Church, Va. Authorities said that from 2005 through 2007, Nguyen assisted a licensed rheumatologist and, despite not having a medical license, prescribed a variety of powerful painkillers, including opiates, more than 3,600 times to 13 different patients.

Prosecutors said neither Nguyen nor the doctor had performed any examinations. The drugs, federal prosecutors said in court documents, included “some of the most addictive and heavily abused prescription drugs on the market.” Prosecutors wrote that Nguyen prescribed the medicine “without any training whatsoever” and wrote prescriptions to people “regardless of their medical condition.” Nguyen’s family said in court papers that they had struggled to adapt to life in rural Pennsylvania, where they were located in 1975. One of his sisters went blind from a brain tumor, and his mother died in 2008. According to family letters sent to the judge, that devastated Nguyen and sent him into drinking spasms. His father, two brothers, a sister, his girlfriend and others wrote heartfelt letters pleading for lenience from the federal judge. They described hardships moving a large family overseas to escape communism and having to leave their patriarch behind to finish his work with the U.S. government. Local Crime & Safety Alerts Breaking news about public safety in and around D.C. His then-girlfriend Patricia Meadows said in a letter to the judge that she and Nguyen had a young child. She said Nguyen had grown up wanting to be a doctor and that he had helped her mother and his mother through various sicknesses. “Khoa has been working in the medical field in one capacity or another for the past decade,” Meadows wrote. “While working with patients, Khoa realized that he really enjoyed the challenge and satisfaction of being in the process of helping them get better. He told me he wished he had the opportunity to finish his medical degree.” At the time of his federal conviction, Nguyen had been enrolled in the medical program at the University of Science Arts & Technology in the British West Indies. The school’s dean of admissions, Orien L. Tulp, wrote the court that they would be willing to take him back as a student even with a felony conviction. “We value him as a worthy and hard working student with the ability to become a fine physician,” the letter said. Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story said the incident happened Monday. It occurred Wednesday.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: iWontGiveUP

Nicholas said. “There is a presumption of innocence.”

This proves he's not a Muslim.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:24 AM
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Vampire?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:25 AM
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a reply to: iWontGiveUP

I wonder how many times he used the same needle?

They did not say if the blood taken was refrigerated. Also, where did he get the money to pay the victims?

Maybe it's cheaper to collect blood this way because of regulations? This is a really weird story. It would have been nice if they were able to determine his motivation.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

"Working for the gov"

This is strange indeed



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: iWontGiveUP

Who are the people who were like "Sure, you can have some of my blood!"

I wonder how he propositioned them. This is an interesting one, for sure..



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: iWontGiveUP

Crazy times, crazy people.

At 20 people per day, these guys would be paying out $600 minimum. $3600 for a six day week and circling $15k a month. They had some disposable cash or an unethical backer.


I would have thought that blood needed sub-zero refrigeration and it seems not. 2-6 degrees celsius is the threshold which is round about a typical domestic fridge. Shelf life ranging from 28 to 42 days.

It seems ghoulish on the surface, but implies a middle man dealing in high quantities of blood. The accused obviously has connections in the medical field. Guess the question is whether he needed all these samples for his own curiosity/research or whether he was supplying someone higher up a darker food chain?

Clean blood doesn't seem the issue here which than raises the possibility of an illicit/covert sampling of the urban population of D.C.

Maybe the samples are snack packs for the elite politicians? Shlurp shlurp.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

Was he drawing tubes or pints from people?

A lot of questions here...



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: iWontGiveUP

Says 'samples' which suggests those little syringe-sized tubes.

Given the sample population, they must be quite the bio-hazard of HIV, STDs and other infectious nasties.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: iWontGiveUP

Who are the people who were like "Sure, you can have some of my blood!"

I wonder how he propositioned them. This is an interesting one, for sure..


The usual people who are targets of black market medical deals. The poor, the destitute, the starving, the drug addled.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

"Large quantities" ???

Of small tubes?

The D.C. Police at it again?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: Jefferton

Sound like a movie .... they say some vampires feed of life's energy and other blood.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:24 PM
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I like the Idea of a stupid Renfield.
getting blood for his vampire master.

BUT!
I think the blood would have been use'd to
make some kind of biological pathogens.
will the next false flag be a biological attack?

edit on 26-5-2017 by buddha because: I just had to do it



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:55 PM
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Wtf?

m.facebook.com...

Anyone care to elaborate

Wtf???



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 01:18 PM
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Strange.
He had ''Drinking Spasms" ?!?! What does that even mean?
I'm sure we are supposed to go right to Alcohol, but that is a pretty clever way of not saying anything incriminating while indicating a certain level of un-controlability on the part of the now "Victim". Sure He deserves some leniency, I mean come on, the poor guy is suffering from the dreaded Drinking Spasms. They are so bad A grown man has to use a Sippy Cup to keep from spilling on his shirt all day. He is a bit of a rebel so he always loved his Martinis stirred, never shaken! Now, that's all he has. All his sodas spew, every time! Torture I tell you!

Or... He could potentially be a creature of the night. Making the Drinking spasms all the more intriguing.

Seriously? There is more to this story. Unless he is independently wealthy, I can not believe he is paying $30 bucks a head for random Crackhead blood out of his own pocket. If he is not backed by a Company of some sort, He is looking for something. They need to see if he has been using home AIDS testing that has become available over the counter. i cant really think of any other reason. It is blood from the absolute highest of risk groups when it comes to HIV, and Hepatitis C, amongst many other nasties. Many have damaged veins so the difficulty level is increased to over 6000. It makes no sense.

And there's my 2 cents.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 01:33 PM
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I wonder if he could be blood doping. I know typically you remove the clients own blood to do that, but he has a penchant for blood and drugs. Sounds like a doping operation to me.



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