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Why white people need to stop saying 'namaste'

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posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: stutteringp0et

I had to laugh at your sign-off. My daughter is learning Greek and is forever saying "Yasou, Amigos!"

If anything, I think cultural appropriation should be taken as a compliment. It means your ancestors came up with something other people also happen to like. Maybe they don't understand it 100% and will never fully grasp the whole significance and meaning... but at least they can give a nod to the idea that it's kind of cool, interesting, useful and nice to have in their world.

It's like the people who gripe about everyone wanting to pretend to be Irish. Well, that beats the heck out of signs saying "No Irish Need Apply" I think.

(As for your certified yoga instructor... I feel your pain. I have a mother-in-law that is roughly the same. LOL)




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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Some souls have an idea of how their culture/religion should be used and creates duality where there should not need to be any.

To a one who understand the word meaning it would be appropriate for me to use namaste if I wish to bow to the divine in them. (Or the potential unmanifested divine that can manifest)

I saw a similar comment from a Sikh once who complained that they where singing mantras that should be meditated on. From my point of view that Sikh had missed the point on how many who listen to the wonderful mantra and get interested in understanding Sikh culture even feeling affection for a culture they do not belong to.



Funny how souls that are religious followers in non dualistic religions like Sikhism and Hinduism that can be so duality driven in spite of their teachings.
edit on 5-4-2016 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-4-2016 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: Stormdancer777 That's what I do, some stretching I do might look like Yoga moves, but I don't have the patients to practice something slow moving in it's entirety... I need something upbeat and peppy to follow along with my full attention.
I sure wouldn't want someone to tell me I shouldn't practice Yoga or Tai Chi because I'm not of their ethnic origin, I can get free videos at the library and practice for free in my own living space!
Not sure I would be comfortable taking a class with a bunch of people.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 04:05 PM
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originally posted by: payt69
Namaste means 'I bow to the divine in you'. This divine aspect transcends colour or race. Supposedly it is in fact that which unites us all.

Close. One puts one fingers and palms together (like praying--you know, "Now I lay me down to sleep"?), brings their hands to their chest (sternum, fingers pointed up), makes eye contact with the recipient, and says, "Namaste" while bowing. The entire set of movements are needed.

The word is more, "I see/recognize the divine/god within you" and the physical bow is either reciprocated or inferred.

Our HR class facilitator taught this to our class as an example of diversity. I think I was the only one that actually had studied Eastern Religions and Philosophies and realized what it really means. It is not simply, "'Sup?" or "Hello!" but a richer significance with religious meaning. I only share with those who are devout out of general respect for their beliefs. And only with both the gesture and utterance of "Namaste."

No cultural appropriation was used in the making of this post!



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 04:46 PM
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I am absolutely appalled by all the responses I've read in this thread... This is literally an issue of respect and consideration for others, which none of the [very few] replies I read have shown. Whenever I try to give the New Agers slack, they just prove how mortifying they are all over again. You can't just pick from cultures as if you're a five year old in a candy store, but that's exactly what's happening. Then when someone speaks out, you shout "SJW" and "Tumblr"! When, SJW is a dead term that doesn't even exist anymore beside by self entitled individuals in the most insignificant areas of the internet (ex: forums and comment sections).

Surely you see the fault in not respecting people like Muddagouni? She's not telling you to stop practicing yoga, she's expressing her discomfort in people abusing a word they don't understand; a word that she understands intimately. Among other things.

OP cleverly (and immaturely) removed the rest of the article that goes into detail Muddagouni's experiences and the history of her culture. I advise reading it and still telling me you think white people should appropriate cultures to their liking, despite the discrimination white people have inflicted on that culture and still do.

If you read nothing else in my comment, read this:

Imagine you and your family have always worn blue clothes. But, ever since you were little, other people (in school, parks, grocery stores...) always gave you disgusting looks for your blue clothes, because they never wore them. You were different. You were often bullied and discriminated against, maybe physically attacked or someone in your family attacked.

But then one day, you notice people wearing blue clothes. Not only that, but it's trending! On twitter... facebook... Even the people who attacked you now enjoy blue clothes. It's suddenly okay and quirky to wear blue clothes.

You're not going to feel "flattered" others now like your blue clothes. You're going to be uncomfortable and upset.

That is cultural appropriation, except "blue clothes" is a VAST understatement compared to entire non-white cultures.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: themsheep

Actually, after taking so much crap over the color blue for so long, I'd probably just be glad everyone stopped being so uptight about the color blue.

People are always borrowing ideas and mixing things up. It's happened with cultures throughout history. People are kind of like 5 year olds in that respect. We're always revising and editing. Even the "unchanging" institutions like religion have been influenced and changed over time.

It's really not a sign of disrespect for "white people" to enjoy other cultures or vice versa. I can understand it being a pet peeve, but to genuinely take offense seems wrong. There's no reason to take offense where none is intended.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: themsheep

Yoga is apart of hindu culture, but it is not owned by their culture. Yoga is just a tool. Shes trying to create barriers and divide with something as innocent as namaste and yoga. Thats why many commenters are against her.

She thinks white yoga practise is spiritual harvesting her culture. Does she expect advertisers to showcase indian models in their yoga adds to a mostly white customer base?

Namaste is the equivelant of saying "IRie" as you smoke a joint next to a rasta poster. I think one can look at it in a negative or positive way. In the positive way, the joint smoka is giving a tip of their hat to jamica and rasta culture. In the negative way, you can see the joint smoker nit picking out the cool things in jamica culture and pretending like he is now apart of that culture. That he is stealing their uniqueness.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: peppycat



Maybe folks that use Yoga for health and fitness should call it something else, same with Tai Chi or Qi Gong if it makes your body healthier, then anyone should be able to practice it for free.


I feel that it is a good thing that Yoga has seen a rise in popularity throughout the world because of its many health benefits for the mind, body and spirit, despite the commercialism of it (which contradicts its core philosophy) and the backlash from those who oppose it due to cultural and religious appropriation being conducted in a distorted manner. The health benefits of practising an aspect of Yoga are amazing and should be promoted. I believe that one day it will evolve to be understood and appreciated the way it was meant to be in full.

I, personally, do not believe labelling it another name will make a difference. All that would do is appease the PC crowd on a superficial level. I also do not feel that Yoga should be restricted to a certain demographic just like certain foods should not be restricted to and only be eaten by those whose land it originates. I enjoy making sushi, and do so with the science, art, and cultural respect that goes into such a ancient cuisine/artform despite not being of Japanese decent. I have come to learn and understand there is more to sushi than meets the eye from the respected sushi chef who taught the course. However, I will never become arrogant enough to start training people myself on how to make sushi because I took a two month course. I do not have years of dedication and discipline towards the craft. Yoga teachers in the Western world should approach with the same respect and understanding...

The article in the OP was more about accepting everyone. It spoke about the absurdity of how an Indian woman can be treated as an outsider in a country such as Australia and still be expected to remain silent when her cultural and religious practice is being bastardized by the very people who treat her as an outcast. The OP post (or his understanding of the issue) was very ironic due to the fact he reflected the very thought process he is objecting to. He missed the mark and/or point entirely. Pot and Kettle kind of thing...



I read a Christian article saying how Christians should stay away from Yoga all together because Yoga is worshipping different Gods.


Those who believe that nonsense should definitely stay away from Yoga since that is not true at all - I feel you. Dogmatic religious people of all faiths seem to be the most intolerant people of them all in this world. They are also the most ignorant concerning their own faith.



Your post was very thoughtful, thank you.


You're most welcome, my friend. And thank you for taking the time and energy to contemplate my post. Wishing you a wonderful week. Take care.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: blueman12



Yoga is apart of hindu culture, but it is not owned by their culture. Yoga is just a tool. Shes trying to create barriers and divide with something as innocent as namaste and yoga. Thats why many commenters are against her.


No, she wasn't. She was pointing out the contradiction in acceptance. She was expressing the fact she is treated as an "other" and expected to condone cultural appropriation in a distorted manner within a land that does not accept her as their own. There is nothing wrong with cultural appropriation when it is done right. That is the crux of the article.



Namaste is the equivelant of saying "IRie" as you smoke a joint next to a rasta poster.


No it is not. I was born to parents who were born and raised in Bermuda and I was raised by Jamaican foster parents after my parents passing. I grew up in a Jamaican home in Toronto. The word "Irie" is Jamaican Patois, meaning: Feeling great; positive; lifted; blessed; etc. The word is NOT inclusive to "Rastafari" (as you suggest) which is a religion that arises from the Abrahamic Belief structure - the same as Judasism, Christianity and Islam do. You have blurred the religion of Rastafari with that of the Jamaican culture and made it one and the same in your post. It is not. And your misunderstanding is a prime example of what is being discussed in the OP article. Your thought process reflects the crux of the article.



I think one can look at it in a negative or positive way. In the positive way, the joint smoka is giving a tip of their hat to jamica and rasta culture. In the negative way, you can see the joint smoker nit picking out the cool things in jamica culture and pretending like he is now apart of that culture. That he is stealing their uniqueness.


I agree that one can shift their perspective to see the cup as half full as opposed to half empty. However, that is not what the OP article is about at all. Again: there is nothing wrong with adapting customs or practices that originated in other cultures as long as it is respected and not bastardized. Those who are against her or are interpreting it as the OP suggested, seem to lack the ability to discern information presented within the proper context.




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 07:42 PM
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Someone should tell her people need to use toilets in her country and not defecate in the street and open fields.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:05 PM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: Dark Ghost

And you know what the funny part is?

Most of this 'white hatred' you see, is from whites on Tumblr and other social media.

Good old SJW's who think that culture appropriation and micro aggressions are a real thing.

White people are just eating themselves alive from the inside out.

~Tenth
Exactly, it's just someone stirring the proverbial # pot. People feed into it constantly.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:08 PM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: Dark Ghost

And you know what the funny part is?

Most of this 'white hatred' you see, is from whites on Tumblr and other social media.

Good old SJW's who think that culture appropriation and micro aggressions are a real thing.

White people are just eating themselves alive from the inside out.

~Tenth


Did anyone else read that in archer's voice?!
and yes you are correct



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 09:41 PM
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I was surfing along minding my own business when I came across a video of a yoga class. The woman leading the class got into one of those poses and then there was a ... sound... emanating from her lower region. She grinned, placed the palms of her hands together, and said, "Namaste."

I think it means, "Excuse me, I just farted."



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 05:10 AM
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I'll bet that if the broad in this article from the OP was black, there'd be a totally different feel to this thread.

I thought it was funny if anything. I experienced it once, hearing a trendy, bearded mop of a man saying namaste, it got under my skin, almost as much as supposebly does.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: mikeone718

Agreed on that.

The middle aged dude who grew up in California, looks like Bill Murray wearing Obi Wan's robes, and speaks in a hushed feminine voice while holding his palms together....we all think he's kinda funny. Thats what pretense is: funny (at least, to the irreverent it is).
edit on 4/6/2016 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 08:35 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I feel the same way about Bless You here in SC. Especially out of the Joel Osteens with the million dollar smiles. Meanwhile making scenes if they don't get their coffee made exactly how they like it.


I am like please don't bless me. You are a fake .......



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: luthier

GUy was here working with me to open a business once and he asked me, "Why are people here so afraid to confront each other? They'll talk behind each others backs, but won't actually give someone the courtesy of talking directly to them?"

Its all social pressure. Or a desire to fit in. Well, that and if you confront someone and they don't like it, your likely to get your nose punched in. But its still social pressure at the end: you don't want to upset those around you.

In any group of monkeys, when its your turn to yawn, you better yawn.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 08:44 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

True.

Though I sometimes take the Gordon Ramsey approach. I am used to being punched in the face as a sparring partner. Especially because my base is not striking. I am pretty good at catching punches with my face.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 08:47 AM
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It used to get on my nerves when someone called me bro or bruv just because we both ride bikes. These people weren't really buying into the real meaning of those words...They wouldn't drop everything to help me out like real bro's would...I still reserve bro for someone who I know has my back, but I don't resent these folks anymore. They have a different worldview than me and so it's fine that they want to call each other bro.

This namaste rubbish is the same, if it really means something to you, reserve it for fellow initiates, but understand that others have a different idea about it and try not to inflict your prejudices upon them.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 08:48 AM
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originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

True.

Though I sometimes take the Gordon Ramsey approach. I am used to being punched in the face as a sparring partner. Especially because my base is not striking. I am pretty good at catching punches with my face.


LOL, you and me both.




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