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Part 2: Seek Ye First the Kingdom of God

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posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 01:53 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman



It's school holidays, I'm all clucked out.


Good job, though




posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: NateTheAnimator
Yeah dude, I've been intending to do that from the get go, while hand drawn is cool and all letters take forever.



posted on Feb, 19 2016 @ 08:33 AM
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posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman

Distribution will kill you - Diamond refuses to deal with small publishers and comics stores are often reluctant to try something from the little guy. You can try indie stores, but in general a comic seller wants someone who can turn out a comic on a regular basis (once a month.) As you've figured out, this is a schedule that can be impossible to meet when life takes a sudden turn for the unexpected (or when your job goes into overtime.)

At this time the industry is difficult to get into -- the big companies aren't taking many new artists and you have to have a rather amazing looking portfolio (Artstation is where the pro illustrators hang out)

You might consider setting it up as a webcomic (one site used by the indies is ComicFury)and going for Patreon support. People are less picky about webcomics not appearing on a regular schedule.

Setting up a table at local comic conventions is time consuming (and expensive) and often not very economically profitable. In addition to the books, other items like prints and buttons sell (PureButtons.com will do a fairly inexpensive run...but.. you're still out $30-$50 for a single type of button.) Printing small orders is not cheap (and dealing with a press can make you want to kick various harmless things.) At least one indie comics artist I know (Donna Barr) is using Lulu for her print comics.

If you're setting up at a con, you'll notice that everyone has freestanding vertical banners (most get them from Vistaprint since they're fast and reliable.) Many also have table banners (they're awkward to carry but important if you want to get noticed.

As for art, Manga Studio is the industry standard. The latest release has poseable models in it that you can use to set up a scene.

Wacom tablets (for drawing on) are sort of the industry standard, but with the new combo computers, many are using direct touch screens as the drawing surface. My favorite, however, is still the Galaxy 10 tablet with integrated pen (10 inch tablet.)

Hope this helps some.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

That's really interesting. Here in the UK, there is a considerable indie market particularly for graffic novels, and a really active and self-supporting community which has a broad cultural out reach, and covers numerous genres. There's not that many making mega-bucks admittedly, but they're getting their work out to an audience, which is what counts, that and not getting screwed, of course.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: Anaana
a reply to: Byrd

That's really interesting. Here in the UK, there is a considerable indie market particularly for graffic novels, and a really active and self-supporting community which has a broad cultural out reach, and covers numerous genres. There's not that many making mega-bucks admittedly, but they're getting their work out to an audience, which is what counts, that and not getting screwed, of course.



Europe's attitude toward comics is much different than the US's attitude. In this respect, the US is far behind the rest of the world. I'd just assumed that Brotherman was a US product, based on spelling and style. I could be wrong.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: Anaana
a reply to: Byrd

That's really interesting. Here in the UK, there is a considerable indie market particularly for graffic novels, and a really active and self-supporting community which has a broad cultural out reach, and covers numerous genres. There's not that many making mega-bucks admittedly, but they're getting their work out to an audience, which is what counts, that and not getting screwed, of course.



Europe's attitude toward comics is much different than the US's attitude. In this respect, the US is far behind the rest of the world. I'd just assumed that Brotherman was a US product, based on spelling and style. I could be wrong.


No, I think that you're right, but I am in the UK, I hadn't realised that it was so tight over there, in which case, I'd suggest he cut to the chase and skip the US, sell direct to Europe.

Forbidden Planet and Travelling Man here in the UK carry independents and limited runs, even the back to basics, home made stuff. Really, really active and growing market, especially now that the cosplay and comic-con (and other things I have no idea about but have great fun getting dragged along to) scenes are really taking off now.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: Byrd
Hey man we should talk, I've been looking and asking for a critic..



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:50 PM
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originally posted by: Anaana
No, I think that you're right, but I am in the UK, I hadn't realised that it was so tight over there, in which case, I'd suggest he cut to the chase and skip the US, sell direct to Europe.

An interesting strategy and one I'll have to look into since it's possible to send files to a European printer now and get them printed locally to the store.


Forbidden Planet and Travelling Man here in the UK carry independents and limited runs, even the back to basics, home made stuff. Really, really active and growing market, especially now that the cosplay and comic-con (and other things I have no idea about but have great fun getting dragged along to) scenes are really taking off now.

Ohyeah! They're fun. I like the big anime conventions as well, though it's a different breed of cat than science fiction cons, furry cons, and small local comic cons. Here in the States, the big comic cons are expensive to attend even as a fan.

I like the smaller local events much better.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:54 PM
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originally posted by: Brotherman
a reply to: Byrd
Hey man we should talk, I've been looking and asking for a critic..



I don't do critiques of art. I will gleefully offer critiques of science research,and I'll edit the heck out of novels for friends. I and can tell you about things that I directly know about -- but I don't offer critiques of art or comics.

You might get some critiques over on DeviantArt. I would recommend that you don't ask for critiques but rather that you look at other webcomics and learn style and storytelling polishing from the ones you like.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 03:33 AM
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originally posted by: Byrd
An interesting strategy and one I'll have to look into since it's possible to send files to a European printer now and get them printed locally to the store.


I have no idea how revenues would work, but if the market is active here, this is where y'all should be putting your work out....where it'll be appreciated.


originally posted by: Byrd
Ohyeah! They're fun. I like the big anime conventions as well, though it's a different breed of cat than science fiction cons, furry cons, and small local comic cons. Here in the States, the big comic cons are expensive to attend even as a fan.

I like the smaller local events much better.


I've only been to local events, I have looked into the nationals and they get the "big" stars, but ticket plus train fare, and then purchases, it gets hellishly pricey. On the local level though, cheap but very cheerful, still lots of commitment. The effort people put into their costumes alone, young and old, is amazing. I've been hugely impressed and won over, and find it fascinating which characters different kinds of people feel an affinity to, and why.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: Anaana
Hmm if I was in the UK id come by prepared to cook dinner and draw for nothing


Dont worry more art to come, there's going to be a flop of it soon



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman

I'll look forward to the "flop"




posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: Anaana
That's what I'm calling it, probably about 25-30 pages of things i drew that I'm not going to use. I'm just going to flop it here out of order from wherever. Lol just let it hang out with its wang out. And besides my favorite clucking mother hen, the offer to cook is always open




posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 02:50 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman



Somewhat concerned about the wang but flop away.

I'll bear the offer of dinner in mind, but should it transpire, in return, I'll bake you a cake, it would be poor-clucking form to do otherwise.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: Anaana
I can do cake



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 02:06 PM
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More to come soon guys and perty ladies! I've been on a bit of hiatus from the move from Mass. Back to Pa and also been doing life sized oil paintings and the comic.



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman I was just wondering about where you've been... you've been moving! Glad to see you back!
How is the comic coming along?



posted on Mar, 21 2016 @ 11:18 PM
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a reply to: peppycat
Everythings coming out ok, my imagination is a very dark place lol.



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman

Great stuff! Just like last time I am very impressed by your work, for what it's worth.

My only issue is that I can't draw nearly as good as you! Lol, keep up the good work



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