It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Reports of Multiple ‘Tremors’ or ‘Sonic Booms’ in NJ

page: 5
23
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 05:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: luthier

Some of the programs have been highly classified 20+ years on. It's institutional momentum to deny that they exist at this point. I know of one that's going on almost 40 years that it's been in the black, and it's still almost unknown to anyone that doesn't have access. The fact that it exists has been rumored and accepted for years, but people that actually know the designation or what it looks like are almost unheard of.


I mean they don't have to say what plane it was, I guess you mean so other military people don't say it wasn't us? It just seems like its easier to say it was a plane end of story.

Or did you mean it wouldn't be on radar? Ah that I get. How do they keep the people monitoring our airspace from knowing?

Sorry for all the questions but it seems you know what you are talking about which is nice for a change and I am curious.
edit on 28-1-2016 by luthier because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 05:49 PM
link   
a reply to: anzha

That was the thought I had, that it might have been something out of Pax River. The timing wouldn't be great for either of the two black platforms it could have been coming home, or heading out.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 05:52 PM
link   
a reply to: luthier

They fly above controlled airspace. Class A airspace goes up to 60,000 feet.

Don't worry about all the questions, I don't mind.
edit on 1/28/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: luthier

They fly above controlled airspace. Class A airspace goes up to 60,000 feet.

Don't worry about all the questions, I don't mind.


Thanks. Appreciate it.

I would assume they don't want to be blown out of the sky so they must collaborate with air defence?

Can a Russian fighter fly above 60,000 and not get tagged. (Or is the question can a Russian plane travel over 60,000 at all
)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:05 PM
link   
a reply to: luthier

Within the US it's not an issue. The military coordinates with the FAA, and doesn't have to tell them what it is, just that they have an aircraft transiting through the airspace.

The MiG-31 Foxhound, one of the best interceptors flying, is capable of Mach 2.83, up to 67,000 feet. Still not as high as they're flying, but that would get a missile a hell of a lot closer, and faster than a missile fired from the ground. The MiG-25 Foxbat was capable of a Mach 3.2 dash, or Mach 2.83 sustained, at almost 68,000 feet. The only thing with them is that if they go a top speed over a certain amount of time they have to have the engines replaced and rebuilt.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: anzha
a reply to: Zaphod58

Supposedly, FA claims it was a F-35C doing the booms.



That's another one I saw, the navy testing a F-35C



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: luthier

Within the US it's not an issue. The military coordinates with the FAA, and doesn't have to tell them what it is, just that they have an aircraft transiting through the airspace.

The MiG-31 Foxhound, one of the best interceptors flying, is capable of Mach 2.83, up to 67,000 feet. Still not as high as they're flying, but that would get a missile a hell of a lot closer, and faster than a missile fired from the ground. The MiG-25 Foxbat was capable of a Mach 3.2 dash, or Mach 2.83 sustained, at almost 68,000 feet. The only thing with them is that if they go a top speed over a certain amount of time they have to have the engines replaced and rebuilt.


Man you know your stuff. Awesome!

I assume non black planes have a signature to let the US know they are friendly.
Can a Russian plane fly over US airspace if its above 60,000? I guess my question is there any height its legal or acceptable. I assume not but angles start getting funny way up there. Could a Russian secret plane or drone fly say 75,000 ft above the US without creating a crisis? And part two would we admit it to the public if it happened? Sorry this may be my last question.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:58 PM
link   
In regards to those "strange sounds heard all over the world" - that supposedly come from the sky...

(you probably know what I'm talking about)

They do sound incredibly similar to the noise of a 'Pulse Detonation Engine'.

Things like this are obviously intriguing, regardless of whether or not these sounds actually emanate from some super secret government aircraft. Lol. But it wouldn't surprise me.

(I'm not attributing this sonic-boom story to the same sound mystery posted above)

Though it is worth looking into - kinda gets your mind going.




posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:58 PM
link   
a reply to: luthier

They don't have to. Under the Open Skies treaty they're allowed to fly either one of their aircraft, or one of our aircraft, equipped with commercial grade sensors over any non-classified areas, with 72 hour prior notice. They couldn't fly over Area 51, but just about anywhere else. They're allowed a certain number of flights a year under the treaty.

However, in regards to your question, no. Even though it's not controlled airspace, it's still national airspace. Entering it without permission is still a major violation and could theoretically result in your aircraft being shot down.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:00 PM
link   
a reply to: iunlimited491

The PDE/PDWE program was an almost utter failure. Great for cruise missiles and small platforms, but for larger platforms, they were only able to get up to about Mach 2 or so. You can get the same speed out of a turbine engine, for much less complexity and much cheaper.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: luthier

They don't have to. Under the Open Skies treaty they're allowed to fly either one of their aircraft, or one of our aircraft, equipped with commercial grade sensors over any non-classified areas, with 72 hour prior notice. They couldn't fly over Area 51, but just about anywhere else. They're allowed a certain number of flights a year under the treaty.

However, in regards to your question, no. Even though it's not controlled airspace, it's still national airspace. Entering it without permission is still a major violation and could theoretically result in your aircraft being shot down.


Got it thank you. Very interesting. I assume this has happened without permission in a time when we or they know there is superior technology to see if it can be detected o r to feel out defense response. Though maybe not.

I guess when you are flying up very high and very fast like our super super sonic drone that keeps crashing you pass through more than your own airspace we and Russia are lucky to have a big piece of land but the UK not so much.

I may pm you sometime about orbital and space drones/testcraft if that's OK? Don't want to go to far off from the op.

Thanks again man.
edit on 28-1-2016 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:09 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Hey, I don't doubt it - you know your stuff when it comes to aircraft and aviation, etc.

Though I'm kinda going back a little bit - and only referencing the sound of the engine.

Today? I'm sure they got all different types of engines/propulsion mechanisms being tested.
edit on 28-1-2016 by iunlimited491 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:13 PM
link   
a reply to: iunlimited491

There are a couple of interesting propulsion methods in use. Really fast, really efficient, lots of fun to see.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:23 PM
link   
What causes that horrid window screech as a fighter jet approaches?
Is that some high pitch harmonic that arrives before the deeper and louder engine tones?
Only heard it once, it seemed quite directional just a few windows screeching in a narrow zone.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:24 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Kind of like last year when the booms were heard both in the UK, New York, and New England. Did it ever come to light what that one was?



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Cauliflower

There are so many. The F-16 has a weird howl when the spoilers open. There are noises as the hydraulics operate, etc.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:25 PM
link   
a reply to: cmdrkeenkid

No, they never officially said.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:29 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

This is an effect on a residential house window nothing in the audible range emanating from the aircraft.
The glass in the windows of the house just start screeching?

Kind of a squeegee like noise I figured it would be common at base housing areas.

edit on 28-1-2016 by Cauliflower because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:30 PM
link   
May be totally off, I am in North-Central Jersey near the intersections of Interstate 78 and 287, so nowhere near the shore area this was mainly centered on.

But around 1:45 - 2:00 I thought something fell in the middle of my house from the boom and shake. The shake was very, very small but the noise made me think an entire shelf of books or something fell. Was rather busy at the time and pretty much forgot about it until a little while ago when I searched around my house for anything that could have fallen to make the noise, and nothing.

Next logical step, check ATS. And hey there is this story.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 07:34 PM
link   
a reply to: Cauliflower

It's type specific. Some aircraft, like the F-16 have a ridiculously pitched engine that even at idle can be heard an incredible distance away. Others like the Hornet, can be heard about half the distance.




top topics



 
23
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join