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Police Cuts UK

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posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: prism

Totally agreed. I have a lot of time for our cops, and I have to ask ATS when was the last time you saw a youtube of actual UK police brutality such as we see from the US almost every day?

Both myself and friends have physically backed coppers up over the years when dealing with violent offenders and losing the battle while awaiting backup. They are vastly outnumbered here in my police area, and only 1 in 10 have a tazer, the rest just telescopic batons.

The cuts are only going to make their job harder, and while personally I've never really relied on the police for my protection, I know that if my head was being kicked in and a copper saw it he/she would try to save me.
I will offer them the same human respect every time. Most of our cops are decent in Devon and Cornwall, they turn a blind eye to BS laws if nobody else is complaining about it, and they make excellent community policing decisions such as not making criminals out of young people they catch smoking pot or whatever, more confiscate (lol) and take home to parents to discuss it with no official caution/conviction on their records.

My area (Devon & Cornwall police) are looking at bringing legal action against the Home Secretary to stop the cuts, but personally I don't expect them to win the battle.
I've never been one to depend on the police though, my friend's Nan got robbed, no call to the police, my friends daughter beaten up, no call, heck I could name many many incidents in life when my social circle has dealt with it ourselves, a few less cops where I live and I'd hardly notice seeing as they as are as rare as hens teeth these days.




posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 11:19 PM
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a reply to: gps777

I think it's all part of the fractional reserve slavery package.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 11:20 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

Sorry, I misunderstood.

Computer was almost dead so couldn't get in on the conversation.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: woogleuk

When we deal with the minor things ourselves we suddenly discover how skilled and resourceful a constable has to be, daily.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 11:39 PM
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a reply to: Kester

I`ve got relatives that live in Devon ( well all over UK ) and I spoke to them the other day regarding the cut backs, they didn`t sound concerned and said in their little town of Seaton they have a police station, though there is never any police in it because of the low crime rate there.

But they were gobsmacked to hear that hired security guards were being used in other places in the UK. So I guess this thread helped spread a bit of word.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 11:40 PM
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a reply to: ShayneJUK

Do they have electronic locks that could fail in an EMP or other event? When I heard about the individual electronic locking stations I immediately foresaw a situation where no-one can get the bloody things unlocked.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: ShayneJUK

Couldn't be more perfect.

I believe the Beanfield, Hillsborough and Orgreave were all anti-constabulary black operations calculated to manipulate public emotion at this point in the war against the Office of Constable.

At the Beanfield police at the roadblock were told two of their colleagues had been run over and killed by the lead vehicle. They carried out their violent attack believing they were avenging murdered colleagues. They were manipulated.

At Hillsborough police were fed a meal shortly before the event to make them drowsy and slow to react. They were specifically instructed to remain detached. These are two of the complaints against them, they were detached and slow to react. The whole of the Hillsborough story follows a similar line. It was a clear black operation with plentiful dry runs beforehand.

At Orgreave there were military men in police uniforms who were recognised by some miners. There were also provocateurs trying to pass themselves off as miners who the miners assumed were police. They were thrown in a heap in front of a police line.

As I see it these three events were scripted to be used as emotional weapons now. We're supposed to blindly discard the traditional constables and accept the privatised police.


“And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?... The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin's thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If...if...We didn't love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation.... We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.”

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
www.goodreads.com...
edit on 7 11 2015 by Kester because: remove word



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 12:44 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

I'll have to look into the NCA when I have time. They seem to have done well here.

www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk...


Rifles and automatic weapons seized
13 August 2015

Seven people have now been charged as a result of a National Crime Agency investigation into the suspected importation of firearms.

Officers seized 22 automatic assault rifles, 9 Skorpion machine pistols, 58 magazines, 2 silencers and around 1000 live rounds of ammunition following an operation on the afternoon of Tuesday 11 August.

Eight people – seven men and a woman all aged between 24 and 58 – were detained by the NCA’s Armed Operations Unit (AOU) and Kent Police Tactical Firearms Command.

Three men and a woman were arrested near the A228 in Cuxton, while three men were detained at a location in Orpington and one at an address in Swanley. The man arrested at Swanley has been released on bail. The others have been charged with importing and possessing firearms.

The guns were seized in holdalls and a suitcase, which also contained numerous magazines and ammunition, from a van as it left Cuxton. It followed the arrival of the MV Albernina, a motor cruiser, which had travelled to the UK from France. The operation to track the vessel involved the NCA working closely with Border Force and the National Maritime Information Centre (NMIC).

Deputy Director Graham Gardner from the NCA said: “This was an extremely significant seizure, the largest of its kind in the UK. I’ve no doubt that these weapons would have ended up in criminal hands and it goes without saying the risk they would have posed to the public.

“We are still in the early stages of a significant investigation which will continue for some time. Through the excellent work and action taken alongside Kent Police we have made a huge step in protecting the public in Kent and further afield.”

The seven have been remanded in custody and are expected to appear via video link at Medway Magistrates Court tomorrow, Friday 14 August. They are:

David Kenneth PAYNE, DOB 28/08/1972, Rochester Road, Halling, Rochester
Jennifer Katherine ARTHY, 16/11/1973, Rochester Road, Halling, Rochester
John Stephen SMALE, 27/04/1957, Rochester Road, Halling, Rochester
Christopher John OWEN, 23/09/1985, Bush Road, Cuxton, Rochester
Harry David SHILLING, 11/04/1993, Hart Dyke Road, Swanley
Michael George DEFRAINE, 03/10/1985, Franklin Road, Bexleyheath
Richard RYE, 06/06/1991, Lime Road, Swanley

A 28-year-old man from Swanley has been released on bail pending further enquiries until 24 September.




edit on 7 11 2015 by Kester because: add pic



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Meanwhile there's still huge quantities of food thrown away by shops, restaurants etc. It's criminal.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

It's by design. They plan a big surprise for us. We have to deflate them.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 01:00 AM
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a reply to: PhoenixOD

That's terrible to hear.

How are they getting in? How much can you afford for locks and reinforcing?



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: prism

The dirty media war against the Office of Constable has influenced many.

This point about pensions is very telling. By picking apart that one issue ATS members can discover for themselves how dishonest and manipulative the media has been.

Focussing attention on pay and pension further removes attention from public safety and civil liberty issues. I believe it's been deliberately made into a bone of contention so the rest of the public think police are overly concerned with their own finances.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: urbanfox

We need local organising to counteract the criminals who are organising.

Home Guard. That will work due to having an old, well tried template to work from, a sense of familiarity, and the inevitable humorous acting up which keeps morale where it should be.




posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 02:09 AM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

It's by design. They plan a big surprise for us. We have to deflate them.




As they say..."we live in interesting times"....



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: grainofsand




My area (Devon & Cornwall police) are looking at bringing legal action against the Home Secretary to stop the cuts, but personally I don't expect them to win the battle.
I've never been one to depend on the police though, my friend's Nan got robbed, no call to the police, my friends daughter beaten up, no call, heck I could name many many incidents in life when my social circle has dealt with it ourselves, a few less cops where I live and I'd hardly notice seeing as they as are as rare as hens teeth these days.


Am i right in thinking your in a fairly rough area,my brother used to live in Plymouth some 20 years ago and it was pretty rough back then from what i remember of it....



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 03:56 AM
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They can make police cuts for all I care, as the police don't do bugger all anyway.

All the people bigging them up obviously haven't needed them.

I've got stories about the police going back 30 years or more and it's always been the same.

They should be called the Ghost Police; I've got this theory they might actually exist.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 04:58 AM
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Hi all, first time poster here


I live in the UK and I would say the majority of people are against these constant police cuts and cost saving measures. Unfortunately many British residents (I'm sure it's the same in other countries), just don't do anything about it. They just vote for the same two parties (Conservatives or Labour) who are both slowly destroying our once great nation.

The main problem for our police is the tick box bureaucracy. They spend an awful amount of time with paper work and not actually on the streets catching criminals! They need to be freed from this burden. They are having to use more and more resources on petty cyber squabbles over the internet too.

Another problem I see is the way we calculate crime to begin with. The politicians just love stating how crime in decreasing in our country. But crime is calculating on how many people REPORT a crime. Many people now just don't report minor offenses, as they know the police have limited resource and nothing will be achieved apart from wasting their own time.

As for armed police, we don't want our regular 'bobbies' carrying guns. Luckily we do not have much gun related crime in our country so most feel it's not needed, especially when we have specialist armed units. Majority of guns are banned in the UK and you will need to have a very good reason to legally own a one and prove that you're capable of storing it safely and securely.

And finally, the war on drugs. I think our police force are now pretty relaxed about cannabis.
www.telegraph.co.uk...

Obviously that raises it's own concerns whether the police should be able to make their own judgment on the law.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 05:18 AM
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a reply to: Kester

I think your probably right and Im sure there are plenty of ex forces who dont like the way down hill slide the UK is currently on, who would be happy to act up in a more more integrated way than for example the territorial s (who also do a great job!).
I guess the main hic-up would be the government arming them, but also whether public Joe would like seeing a 'military force' patrolling every town. maybe they will need to at least 'look' more civilian/police based.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 05:24 AM
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Now it turns out that the Home Office used the wrong figures all along when calculating budgets and cuts - this is an unprecedented cock up.


originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: prism

Totally agreed. I have a lot of time for our cops, and I have to ask ATS when was the last time you saw a youtube of actual UK police brutality such as we see from the US almost every day?

Both myself and friends have physically backed coppers up over the years when dealing with violent offenders and losing the battle while awaiting backup. They are vastly outnumbered here in my police area, and only 1 in 10 have a tazer, the rest just telescopic batons.


Good to see, there was a local case a few years ago where even a fleeing stopped and ran to the aid of police after one of them got a branch in her eye. I've personally been smoking jazz cigarettes a few times in their presence and they've not batted an eyelid, had a friendly converstation to make sure myself/others aren't troublemakers then nodded and winked and told us not to smoke them near families/normal people (i.e basic manners and respect).

I've found the Met and Matrix to be pretty robotic/act first act questions later but they are dealing with the seriously hardeneded criminals so guess it's a requirement of the job - the rest are mainly good people who want to help out.

G4S on the other hand are just paid thugs - that's where the contracts will all go according to mates in CID coppers on the street will be a thing of the past in a few years with shops etc using private security guards instead.

I things carry on this way I can see a few police revealing how the government have changed the chief police/mangerial structure and who are getting the jobs - when the public here that it'll be a major scandal. The policy is so stupid, scandalous and dangerous it beggars belief.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 09:18 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: grainofsand
Am i right in thinking your in a fairly rough area,my brother used to live in Plymouth some 20 years ago and it was pretty rough back then from what i remember of it....
No, I'm at the sleepy coast these days but I did live in Plymouth for 3 years when I was at Uni. To be honest I always feel safe in Plymouth even areas like Devonport, Stonehouse, St Budeaux & N.Prospect, some of the most decent people you can find there.

The only downside I ever found with police in Plymouth are the military police who patrol on weekend nights, they don't take any messing with.
I was thrown into the back of an MP van after being involved in fighting with some matelots once, I couldn't shout "I'm a civvie" quickly enough. They threw me to the local police and then carried on hitting the sailors with their sticks lol.


originally posted by: bastion
G4S on the other hand are just paid thugs - that's where the contracts will all go according to mates in CID coppers on the street will be a thing of the past in a few years with shops etc using private security guards instead.
That is what concerns me, barely literate SIA badged security guards walking the streets after a 2 week course.
I know one thing, in situations where crim's tend to comply and not assault police constables, I can see private guards getting beatings when the overstep their mark.
Personally, if a private guard tries anything on me when I'm innocent I will always use force to defend myself. The story I mentioned earlier involved me defending myself against a guard who dared to touch me, he lost the confrontation, and the police (when they arrived) agreed with me.
No respect for an SIA badge, but plenty of respect for warrant carrying constables.

...I see private guards getting beaten regularly if they become common 'walking the beat' on public streets.
Who the # has respect for someone who does a 2 week course and requires no more than GCSE English to get the badge.
Yep, paid thugs, and I'll shed no tears when the communities treat them less than constables. It is the professionalism and training of our police that gives them the respect of the communities, NOT the high-vis stab vest.



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