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The case for Ley Lines

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posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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From Ancient-Wisdom.com:

"Ley lines are hypothetical alignments of a number of places of geographical interest, such as ancient monuments and megaliths. Their existence was suggested in 1921 by the amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins, whose book 'The Old Straight Track' brought the alignments to the attention of the wider public'."

www.ancient-wisdom.com...

And here is a Wikipedia article discussing the probability of random point alignments:

en.m.wikipedia.org...

Is it possible to statistically prove or disprove the existence of such things as ley lines?

And what about the probability of multiple ley lines intersecting at a given location, or more complex geometric patterns than simple point alignments (like triangles, squares, pentagons, etc.)?




posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: NeoIkonEpifanes
From Ancient-Wisdom.com:

"Ley lines are hypothetical alignments of a number of places of geographical interest, such as ancient monuments and megaliths. Their existence was suggested in 1921 by the amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins, whose book 'The Old Straight Track' brought the alignments to the attention of the wider public'."

www.ancient-wisdom.com...

And here is a Wikipedia article discussing the probability of random point alignments:

en.m.wikipedia.org...

Is it possible to statistically prove or disprove the existence of such things as ley lines?

And what about the probability of multiple ley lines intersecting at a given location, or more complex geometric patterns than simple point alignments (like triangles, squares, pentagons, etc.)?


To disprove something it first has to be proven, Mystical Ley lines have remained in the purvey of pseudo historic fantasy since Alfred Watkins. Ley lines as straight lines between ancient sites has long been accepted. Its the confusion of the two that causes controversy



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 03:59 PM
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The question in my mind is twofold.

- Do alignments of ancient sites really exist? Answering this question includes testing such claimed alignments against the null hypothesis that they are mere statistical artifacts or the product of chance (see the previous link on random point alignments)

- If these alignments are real (i.e. statistically significant), what was their purpose and what meaning did they have to the ancient civilizations who created them?
edit on 13-8-2015 by NeoIkonEpifanes because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: NeoIkonEpifanes

The difference between having a straight line with points of no meaning, and a line with points that carry a purpose, adds up to something much greater than the sum of it's parts. I'm not sure how that would factor statistically.

Also is it the lines, the points or a combination that would give a ley line its 'use'?

In England everything is bunched up whereas in the U.S. or China for example, the distances carry added authenticity of purposeful construction.

Each element in a line should be looked at, including mathematical number, place names, architectural features, star/sun/moon orientation, land owners, church/temple saints/deities, local legends and even anecdotal experiences.

With technology we can expand on Alfred Watkins' initial theory.

Only then can we be sure that we have the right info to make a case for a ley line.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: firesnake

I'm looking into this in my local area before I start on larger scales.

The reason behind them? The big question. My hunch right now is that each node point is like an acupuncture pin in a serpent like energy stream, which many have suggested.

What I'd like to know is, if these energy points were known in prehistory, is there a sect of the church or similar that had access to this knowledge, or did they just place churches on older existing sites? Who gets to choose where a church or temple is built, and why?



posted on Aug, 14 2015 @ 12:27 AM
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I've read about these. There are significant alignments in some places. But do they mean something about Earth energy? Don't know. Perhaps some of these alignments were along a road or path which has since been lost. Or perhaps people created these alignments simply for reasons known only to themselves. Washington D.C. has certain intentional alignments, but those are based on the plan for the city. Of course Capital to Washington Monument to Reflecting Pool to Lincoln Memorial to JFK burial is the obvious one. What will people a thousand years from now make of that?
a reply to: NeoIkonEpifanes



posted on Aug, 14 2015 @ 07:10 PM
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a reply to: Parthin96

The structure of a pyramid is an indication of earth's energy being manifested literally from a broad source to a specific point ( the capstone.)

I'm no expert on the topic but i picture the concept being similar to acupuncture. The human body contains many different meridians or channels ( like the earth and its ley lines. ) Then there's soecific points along those channels that are concentrations of energy ( where ancient structure were placed.)

Just because you can't dissect a human body and SEE an energy channel doesn't mean that it doesn't exist. The Chinese have spent thousands of years perfecting this. I feel the same is true for the Earth as well. Because the bottom line is, the planet is alive. No pun intended haha.




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