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Gov't 101 with Jesse Ventura: 4th Amendment

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posted on May, 29 2015 @ 02:06 PM
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Key sections of the Patriot Act are set to expire in June. So this week on Off the Grid, I discuss all of the ways that the NSA is violating our Fourth Amendment rights by using it as a loophole.

Will you support the Surveillance State Repeal Act and protect your 4th Amendment rights? Let me know.




posted on May, 29 2015 @ 02:21 PM
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Will you support the Surveillance State Repeal Act and protect your 4th Amendment rights? Let me know.


I will just as soon as everyone starts supporting the 4th amendment violations of federal background check with firearms.



Amendment IV The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.




The right to privacy is the RIGHT to Privacy.

www.law.cornell.edu...

And then Repeal the FISA ACT.



The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 ("FISA" Pub.L. 95–511, 92 Stat. 1783, 50 U.S.C. ch. 36) is a United States federal law which prescribes procedures for the physical and electronic surveillance and collection of "foreign intelligence information" between "foreign powers" and "agents of foreign powers" (which may include American citizens and permanent residents suspected of espionage or terrorism).[1] It has been repeatedly amended since the September 11 attacks.


en.wikipedia.org...

Let's go for the trifecta.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: JesseVentura

Obama and the White House issued a statement saying failure to keep data collection" is like playing Russian roulette with national security."


With Obama's record on national security, maybe we should listen to him? After all he's bound to be right sooner or later. Lol
edit on 29-5-2015 by Greathouse because: (no reason given)





(This post is heavily laced with sarcasm)
edit on 29-5-2015 by Greathouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:41 PM
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without privacy there is no freedom!



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: JesseVentura



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 11:33 PM
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I can't believe they are trying to push this through...again. The thing is even the FBI admits mass surveillance hasn't done a single thing on the war for "terrorism" ie the new war on drugs vs 2.0.

The FBI admits that they have not stopped any terrorist attack or caught any terrorists using the Patriot Act.

While Jeb Bush is campaigning on how Rand Paul is wrong and the Patriot Act is great, the FBI admits that it hasn’t had anything to do with keeping us safe as far as they are concerned. This is (somewhat surprisingly) reported in the Washington Times: “FBI admits no major cases cracked with Patriot Act snooping powers.”

Here is a quote from Washington Times:



FBI agents can’t point to any major terrorism cases they’ve cracked thanks to the key snooping powers in the Patriot Act, the Justice Department’s inspector general said in a report Thursday that could complicate efforts to keep key parts of the law operating.

Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz said that between 2004 and 2009, the FBI tripled its use of bulk collection under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which allows government agents to compel businesses to turn over records and documents, and increasingly scooped up records of Americans who had no ties to official terrorism investigations.

The FBI did finally come up with procedures to try to minimize the information it was gathering on nontargets, but it took far too long, Mr. Horowitz said in the 77-page report, which comes just as Congress is trying to decide whether to extend, rewrite or entirely nix Section 215.

Backers say the Patriot Act powers are critical and must be kept intact, particularly with the spread of the threat from terrorists. But opponents have doubted the efficacy of Section 215, particularly when it’s used to justify bulk data collection such as in the case of the National Security Agency’s phone metadata program, revealed in leaks from former government contractor Edward Snowden.

The new report adds ammunition to those opponents, with the inspector general concluding that no major cases have been broken by use of the Patriot Act’s records-snooping provisions.



edit on 29-5-2015 by sirChill because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: JesseVentura

Those who support pretty much anything US government does or plans to do are Traitors

We will deal with all of them in due time.

edit on 31-5-2015 by BentBone because: (no reason given)



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