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Room in the world for introverts.

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posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:36 AM
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This is a large planet, and our interior world is probably much larger than your actual world, so do you mind leaving us some room to be ourselves? Great video. For any of the "I" Jungian types out there, I hope it offers some perspective.




posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: Nechash

I've seen it before.

Very good, very witty.

Very true.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: Nechash

I love being around my people. My friends, my family, my clan. They are a part of me, little chunks of my being that never leave me, no matter how far apart we may be.

However, what this lady states in the video about the need for healthy solitude, is something so simple, and yet so rarely stated or focused upon in this modern era. It is something that I can appreciate the importance of. When I go to the bar, or to a friends house until late, and am about to leave, the most common question I am asked is how I intend to get home. I live between three and four miles from the places I am most often to be found when out and about. When I reply to the effect that I intend to walk home, I am often met with blank confusion, or concern for my well being.

What my very best friends know, is that they need not worry, or be confused about my reasoning. Aside from the obvious benefits to my cardiovascular health that a three mile walk represents, this wind down time, the solitude to process the days events, is as crucial for my health as knowing that there are people out there who are looking out for me, as getting the exercise, as breathing in and out.

I completely agree also, with the way that the speaker in the video references the way that classrooms and workspaces are arranged. Thankfully, the sort of work I do suits my mental construction very well these days, but when I was in full time education, the focus on assimilating the minds of everyone else in my immediate location, was emphasised with much greater force than allowing my own mind to speak to me on the topics being covered in classes.

I liked the video, and I thank you for bringing it to my attention!



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit



when I was in full time education, the focus on assimilating the minds of everyone else in my immediate location, was emphasised with much greater force than allowing my own mind to speak to me on the topics being covered in classes.


As a nurse, I'm constantly bombarded with these sh!tty little courses whose main aim seems to be to get the people on the course to make friends.

I recently attended a First Aid refresher course of just 3 hours duration (the original one was a 3-days slog).

I went with a work colleague, and the other 6 or 7 people were strangers from different areas of the country and different areas of work.

Never met em before - never would again.

Yet the tutor felt the need to make each of us introduce ourselves and spend a minute or so talking about our work and backgrounds.

I can't escape; the nature of my job, I have to do these courses on a regular basis.

Gives me the right hump.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: CJCrawley

From the manner in which you describe these courses, it seems as if the insistence upon introduction to one another, is meant to help reinforce the human element of the work you do. As a nurse, I would imagine that it is important that you be able to communicate effectively with people who come under your care, many of whom you will never see once they are discharged from whatever ward or facility that you work in.

However, the way you talk about it, one would assume that the attempt made by these training sessions to reinforce that element of your working life, is particularly ham fisted.

Surely first aid is a skill set which is best employed calmly under pressure, rather than mid way through a nice chat about the weather, or some other banality? While I would understand the need to be able to relate to people during the normal course of a day in your field, I am confused about the need for that sort of training as part of a first aid course.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit


From the manner in which you describe these courses, it seems as if the insistence upon introduction to one another, is meant to help reinforce the human element of the work you do.


No, I don't think it's gauged to nurses specifically; you have to remember that many people on these courses aren't nurses at all, or anything related. I think this emphasis on enforced socialisation of strangers is something that has crept into education over the last 30 years or so.



As a nurse, I would imagine that it is important that you be able to communicate effectively with people who come under your care, many of whom you will never see once they are discharged from whatever ward or facility that you work in.


Yes, that's true, and I do do that, as does every nurse; in fact, I've never met a nurse who hasn't done so, or was incapable or unwilling to do so (though the turnover of patients depends on what specialty you work in).

Communication is key; every single shift a nurse has to hand over the shift to oncoming staff (which means talking to an office full of people for 15 to 30 minutes). It's not a job for the pathologically shy.

That doesn't necessarily mean I want to feel coerced into chewing the fat with a bunch of strangers I'm never going to meet again every time I do a short course - which can be 10 to 20 a year for as long as I stay a nurse.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: CJCrawley

Ah, I see!

So the others on the course were not necessarily nurses? Surely nurses should be trained in a separate fashion to persons who are not actually part of the medical infrastructure, and in separate courses therefore?

The perfunctory emphasis on communication in this respect seems unnecessary if the course is structured as you say, and since communication is a part of your job anyway, it is doubly superfluous!



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