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Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

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posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 12:30 AM
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time curve for ebola 1995, ebola 2000

the curve of previous outbreaks 1995 and in 2000 show the whole curve lasted 10 weeks in general from start (0 cases) to finsh(0cases) the curve rising, peaking, and gowing downwhile the current curve is still in the rising stage even after 5 months from start!!
this could be evidence it is man made with different strains (of different incubation periods) and different starting times.
evidence of man made.
current time curve
edit on 10-8-2014 by reletomp because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 02:32 PM
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And so it begins...ordered quarantine.

Ebola quarantine ordered for relief workers returning to North Carolina


Health officials in North Carolina said on Sunday they will require missionaries and others coming home after working with people infected with Ebola in Africa to be placed in quarantine.

The quarantine is set to last for three weeks from the last exposure to someone infected in the West African Ebola outbreak, which is centred in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, the officials said.

Missionaries from the North Carolina-based Christian aid groups SIM USA and Samaritan’s Purse have been working to help combat the world’s worst outbreak of the disease. Two of the relief workers, Dr Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, contracted the disease and are being cared for at Emory University hospital in Georgia.



source

What now happens to anyone and everyone returning to home countries/ states from infected areas? International flights from countries with confirmed cases?



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: DancedWithWolves
Sensible move if you ask me, 3 weeks out of a life sitting around in a hospital waiting to be cleared aint really that bad if you are returning from caring for ebola victims.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 06:59 PM
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Bodily fluids from Atlanta ebola patients dumped into city sewage system

Think they're properly disposing of Brantly and Writebol's body fluids in an incinerator or other hazardous waste treatment system? Think again.


Ebola patients, Dr. Brantly and Nancy Writebol are presently being treated in an isolation unit at Emory University hospital. Protocol ensures they are kept in a single patient room. All persons entering must wear double gloves, gown, eye protection, face mask, disposable shoe covers and leg coverings. Dedicated medical equipment should be disposable. However, the Ebola patient’s wastes are going into public sewage.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) site proclaims that U.S. hospitals can safely manage a patient with EVD (the viral Ebola hemorrhage fever) by following “recommended isolation and infection control procedures.” Further down in the report it reveals “Liquid medical waste such as feces and vomitus can be disposed of in the sanitary sewer.”

Atlanta’s sewer system covers about a 19 square mile area, comprising about 15 percent of Atlanta’s total area. Their website acknowledges “but this system is aging as well, and sanitary sewer overflows occur frequently.” The city has four water reclamation centers and 14 pump stations that pump waste water flows into the sewer system.


Better hope y'all don't get any heavy rains there in ATL any time soon. Have fun with that. :/
edit on 10-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

This doesn't die outside the host real quick like some more common viruses. The sewage would be like a petri dish on super steroids, wouldn't it? Are they insane?

There has to be some mistake.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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originally posted by: MrCynic
a reply to: 00nunya00


There has to be some mistake.


Yep: bringing ebola bodily fluids into the US. That was the mistake.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

Should we be worried about drinking anything bottled in Atlanta from now on?



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 11:18 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

Sounds irresponsible to me
Heavy rains will do it. I drank contaminated water a few weeks ago and was deathly ill. It was after a heavy rainfall. After I puked my guts out , I found out we should be boiling water. I simply wasn't aware. It overflows and gets contaminated with fecal matter. Lovely.

If you guys in Atlanta get heavy rain, do not drink your water, or even brush your teeth in it. Do what you do for a visit to Mexico. Might be wise to stockpile some water now. Just in case.




edit on 10-8-2014 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 11:21 PM
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I've been wondering when someone was going to bring this up. I found this a couple of weeks ago.

who virus survival report

It was a long read, My eyes are just too fatigued to read over it again and provide some quotes. Hopefully someone with freshers eyes than mine will do it.


edit on 8/10/1414 by NoAngel2u because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 11:30 PM
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Let's not forget that sewage sludge is spread on fields a fertilizer.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: NoAngel2u

I think it's used on lawns too. I find this a bit disturbing. I assumed they were incinerating everything.

What about sewer rats can they catch it?



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 02:32 AM
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originally posted by: NoAngel2u
Let's not forget that sewage sludge is spread on fields a fertilizer.

I thought fertilizer was from animals, not human waste?



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 06:18 AM
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Likely it will be mixed with Bleach or some chlorine solution and passed through UV light before it leaves the hospital pipes. That will be enough to kill Ebola.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 06:32 AM
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originally posted by: violet
I thought fertilizer was from animals, not human waste?


Not always. There is a huge uproar in my area of western NY about the possible use of sewer sludge on farm land around here. Here is the EPA FAQ page on it. (Sorry to be off topic... back to lurker mode)



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok

I hope so. It would be good to know for a fact that (all) hospitals treat their sewage waste in that manner before it moves on to public waste facilities.

Unfortunately, hospital waste is not the only worrisome thing with regards to using human waste sludge, but that's another topic altogether.


edit on 8/11/1414 by NoAngel2u because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: NoAngel2u

They should do.

In the UK in all the labs I have worked out, human waste that has possible infectious material is treated with Virkon then passed through UV before joining the outside world. One place used to blast it with ionising radiation too.

Hopefully Emory should do the same.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: MyMindIsMyOwn

originally posted by: violet
I thought fertilizer was from animals, not human waste?


Not always. There is a huge uproar in my area of western NY about the possible use of sewer sludge on farm land around here. Here is the EPA FAQ page on it. (Sorry to be off topic... back to lurker mode)


Ok, you learn something new everyday.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 11:53 AM
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originally posted by: crazyewok
Likely it will be mixed with Bleach or some chlorine solution and passed through UV light before it leaves the hospital pipes. That will be enough to kill Ebola.


Our city once put so much chlorine into our water, it stunk the whole house up, every time I used water or I flushed a toilet. It was giving me a headache. I didn't want to shower or wash my hair in pure bleach . I called to enquire and they said the pump broke and put too much in. So I wonder, were they just trying to put enough in to kill something?



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 04:03 PM
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Now that Spain has procured a dose of Zmatt for their 75 year old Priest brought back to Spain with ebola...

The crap is hitting the fan over how they got it, and whom should get it.

Spain gets rare Ebola drug to treat stricken priest

A Spanish priest has received one of the world's few doses of an experimental Ebola drug, raising ethical questions about how to allocate scarce medicines for a fatal disease at at time when the virus has infected at least 1,779 people in West Africa.

The drug, ZMapp, is a mixture of three antibodies engineered to recognize Ebola and bind to infected cells so the immune system can kill them. It hasn't yet been tested in humans.

ZMapp's maker, Mapp Biopharmaceutical of San Diego, has said "very little of the drug is currently available" and that it is cooperating with government agencies to increase production as quickly as possible. The drug -- made available on a compassionate use basis -- also takes several months to produce, meaning that it will be months before any would be available in large amounts. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has publicly said that he knows of only three or four doses.

Two American aid workers, who were infected with Ebola and flown from Africa to a special unit at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, also have received doses.

Contrary to what many people believe, the "ultimate decision" for who gets an experimental drug is made by the manufacturer, not the government, says Arthur Caplan, head of the division of medical ethics at New York University's Langone Medical Center. Companies have drastically different policies for making unapproved drugs available, he says.

The World Health Organization scheduled a special meeting Monday to discuss how to ration scarce doses of the drug, and is expected to release a statement Tuesday. There are currently no proven medications or vaccines to treat Ebola, which has killed at least 961 people, although several therapies are in development.

The fact that three Westerners have received ZMapp has led some to criticize the manufacturer of being biased toward Americans or whites, when so many black Africans are dying. Nigerian officials say they had asked U.S. health authorities about getting the Ebola drug but were apparently not helped.

Last week, Anthony Kamara, a 27-year-old man riding a bicycle in Freetown, Sierra Leone, said "Americans are very selfish. They only care about the lives of themselves and no one else."

He referred to ZMapp as "the miracle serum" that the U.S. has "refused to share with us to save African lives."

The lack of wider availability "shows simply that white patients and black patients do not have the same value in the eyes of world medicine," Nouridine Sow, a sociology professor at the Universal Institute of Guinea, said last week. www.usatoday.com...


Nigeria is hoppin' mad they can't get it.

Des



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: Destinyone

Well, if we use Navydoc's explanation, it's because they (evey day medically uneducated Africans) wouldn't understand it like a medical professional would. Which is BS, of course, because if that was the case, then they would have offered it to the African medical professionals that became ill before our hero doctor.

Obviously, what's going on here is not about what's fair, but what's profitable. People can claim racism if the want, but I don't think that's it at all. Money, money, money.


edit on 8/11/1414 by NoAngel2u because: (no reason given)



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