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Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

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posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:47 AM
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Nothing you posted is factually accurate. The virus can only be spread while symptomatic.

a reply to: reletomp




posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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I've spent a little bit of time looking at some of the older research published in mid 90s about the Ebola outbreaks of the Zaire strain, of which the current outbreak is a descendant, and have come to a very disturbing conclusion.


EHF is transmitted principally by direct physical contact with an ill person or their body fluids during the later stages of illness.
...
Direct physical contact with a clinically ill patient was necessary, though not sufficient, for secondary transmission. All 28 secondary cases touched the ill person, while none of the 78 household members who reported no physical contact during the period of clinical illness became infected.


Transmission of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever: A Study of Risk Factors in Family Members, Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1995

Notice how much emphasis is on direct physical contact.

Compare that to the latest warnings and protocols from the various health authorities around the world and you see an increase danger from indirect (casual) contact.

I would ask for any with medical training to weigh in on this aspect.
edit on 9-8-2014 by jadedANDcynical because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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Not an increased danger, just better protocols.

a reply to: jadedANDcynical



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:04 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

It would seem to be a case of "better safe than sorry" in the sense that considering the lack of a good first response to the outbreak it spread way more than it should. As Raymundoko said, logic dictates that in this cases you have to apply better protocol in an all out effort to finally start stopping this outbreaks spread. One of the previous characteristics of this virus was that it just appeared and disappeared fast, thanks to fast response on containment and wise use of resources and strategy. This time containment seems to have failed due to lack of information on part of the population (the virus is new to that part of África), slow response on part of the health care authorities and a combination of cultural customs that facilitate its propagation. I am not a virologist, I am not even a medic, but I think that anybody in this situation (considering how much it has spread) would err on the side of caution.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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the virus in the past appeared and disappeared quicly because it started in isolated remote area where people dispersed far from each other to cause a launcing pad.

like the nigerian doctor explained in congressnal testimony.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
Nothing you posted is factually accurate. The virus can only be spread while symptomatic.

a reply to: reletomp

if that so, then why the lab test. why worry about transmission then ?

and why tested positive have to be isolated even before symptoms appear
?
edit on 9-8-2014 by reletomp because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 03:04 PM
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I just got home from work. did anyone post a story on the Catholic Nun in the Congo who died today. Only heard a brief snippet of story while driving home.

I'll see if I can find it via google.

TIA

Des



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 03:07 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 03:08 PM
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I just got home from work. did anyone post a story on the Catholic Nun in the Congo who died today. Only heard a brief snippet of story while driving home.

I'll see if I can find it via google.

Nevermind...found it.




Catholic Nun Dies From Ebola While Working In Liberia

MADRID (AP) – A Catholic humanitarian group based in Spain says a nun from the Congo who was working in Liberia has died of the Ebola virus.

The San Juan de Dios hospital order says Saturday that Sister Chantal Pascaline died "from Ebola in the Hospital San Jose de Monrovia, despite the care she received from a volunteer nurse."

Pascaline belonged to the same order as a Spanish missionary priest and nun evacuated to Madrid by jet this week. Both are in stable condition in a Madrid hospital.

The latest Ebola outbreak is the largest and longest ever recorded for the disease and so far has killed at least 961 people, the U.N. health agency said Friday. It emerged in Guinea in March and has since spread to Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria latino.foxnews.com...


TIA

Des

edit on 9-8-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: Destinyone

No, she was from the Congo, but she died in Liberia.

Her story is sad. This lady went there to help people with Ebola


www.bellanaija.com...


The nun, Chantal Pascaline, passed away this morning at Saint Joseph Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia.

edit on 9-8-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 04:08 PM
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originally posted by: violet
a reply to: Lyxdeslic
Hopefully you are misinformed.
Keep us posted on what you find out.

They're bringing quite a few Americans back, that don't have it, but what if they do? These people will be interacting with the community.

I just don't think it's wise to take a chance it really isn't airborne.

I'm equally concerned that precautions aren't always followed. I've spent the past few years in and out of hospitals and have observed some nurses just not caring to be hygienic. I had to report them. I see people in general not knowing about transferring germs.



Sorry to bring this back up, but she asked to be kept informed. I asked about it again last night. Apparently after being put in insolation, they did the required tests, and the patient tested negative. So that's good news. Apparently they are testing people everywhere, which is also good. Not something to be taken lightly.

www.whio.com...
www.nydailynews.com...
nypost.com...


Also, links.
edit on 9-8-2014 by Lyxdeslic because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-8-2014 by Lyxdeslic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 04:54 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 04:58 PM
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Just an aside, drove by Phoenix Air base in Cartersville, GA around 11AM today and saw the GIII present. Went back by at 3:30 and it was not visible. Have no idea if on another mission or moved into hanger.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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Let's address the content of posts not the poster, Please.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:43 PM
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Seems that there's plenty of ZMapp to go around, you just have to pass the "paper bag test" in order to "deserve" it


Madrid, Aug 10 (IANS/EFE): A Spanish missionary, who was infected with Ebola virus, is being treated with the experimental serum "ZMapp" in Madrid.

ZMapp was imported from Geneva. Miguel Pajares,75, was repatriated Thursday from Liberia.

Doctors caring for the priest at Carlos III Hospital in Madrid, a leading institution in the treatment of tropical and infectious diseases, are therefore permitted to give him the serum, used in the US to treat missionaries Nancy Writebol and Kent Brantly, who were also repatriated to the US from Liberia.



"TB" just happens to outbreak in Atlanta


With the entire world on edge about Ebola, people are remaining vigilant about their health. Vigilance, in some cases, is even replaced with out-right paranoia.

A doctor infected with Ebola was transported to Atlanta, Georgia recently. The transportation of the patient caused fear to tear through the population despite the CDC assuring citizens that there was very little to worry about. Now, Georgia Health News has reported on a different disease outbreak in the city.

It is an outbreak that has gained very little notice over the years.

According to the director of health protection for Public Health, Dr. Patrick O’Neal, the Tuberculosis (TB) strain that is causing the outbreak in Atlanta is the same strain of TB that they began finding in 2009.

The current outbreak strain is semi-drug resistant. Isoniazid has no affect on the TB strain in question, but it is affected by other anti-TB medication.

Cases of TB in Atlanta have been on the rise in the past months. In May there were a total of 16 cases reported. Reports of infection have now increased to 47, with 3 dead.

The TB outbreak mainly affects homeless people and shelter volunteers. Dr. O’Neal indicated that the reasoning behind the outbreak targeting homeless shelters was because they typically “have very poor sanitation and infection control measures.”


Good thing Atlanta is such a "first world" city and there's little chance of any nasties spreading there. :/ No chance of ebola avoiding spread in ATL if any mistakes are made. o_O
edit on 9-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:06 PM
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Also, as an aside, there has been an app game out for a few years that actually supplies real African villiages with things like soap and clean water and mosquito nets and such----"Raise the Villiage"


We Farm, Tap Zoo and countless other similar apps have made tons of money by asking you to spend yours on virtual goods. A brand new iPhone app called Raise the Village wants to use the same model to benefit a charitable cause. And in an odd twist, virtual goods you purchase in Raise the Village actually end up paying for their real-world counterparts.


Read on for details, and read the fine print, but I've been playing it for years, and it's not only fun, but really does help with things that can help sanitary conditions in Africa, at least a little bit. Might be a fun distraction from the gloom and doom of this outbreak, and at least you're doing *something* to directly help these victims and potential victims. Give it a look.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:14 PM
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originally posted by: 00nunya00
Seems that there's plenty of ZMapp to go around, you just have to pass the "paper bag test" in order to "deserve" it


Madrid, Aug 10 (IANS/EFE): A Spanish missionary, who was infected with Ebola virus, is being treated with the experimental serum "ZMapp" in Madrid.

ZMapp was imported from Geneva. Miguel Pajares,75, was repatriated Thursday from Liberia.

Doctors caring for the priest at Carlos III Hospital in Madrid, a leading institution in the treatment of tropical and infectious diseases, are therefore permitted to give him the serum, used in the US to treat missionaries Nancy Writebol and Kent Brantly, who were also repatriated to the US from Liberia.



"TB" just happens to outbreak in Atlanta


With the entire world on edge about Ebola, people are remaining vigilant about their health. Vigilance, in some cases, is even replaced with out-right paranoia.

A doctor infected with Ebola was transported to Atlanta, Georgia recently. The transportation of the patient caused fear to tear through the population despite the CDC assuring citizens that there was very little to worry about. Now, Georgia Health News has reported on a different disease outbreak in the city.

It is an outbreak that has gained very little notice over the years.

According to the director of health protection for Public Health, Dr. Patrick O’Neal, the Tuberculosis (TB) strain that is causing the outbreak in Atlanta is the same strain of TB that they began finding in 2009.

The current outbreak strain is semi-drug resistant. Isoniazid has no affect on the TB strain in question, but it is affected by other anti-TB medication.

Cases of TB in Atlanta have been on the rise in the past months. In May there were a total of 16 cases reported. Reports of infection have now increased to 47, with 3 dead.

The TB outbreak mainly affects homeless people and shelter volunteers. Dr. O’Neal indicated that the reasoning behind the outbreak targeting homeless shelters was because they typically “have very poor sanitation and infection control measures.”


Good thing Atlanta is such a "first world" city and there's little chance of any nasties spreading there. :/ No chance of ebola avoiding spread in ATL if any mistakes are made. o_O


I doubt it the priest will survive the ebola without horse derived antitoxin (antibodies ) of any kind.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:23 PM
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posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:26 PM
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Helpful map of "suspected", "negative" and "confirmed" cases of ebola in the US

Also has a map of worldwide suspected and confirmed cases



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