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First ‘smart’ pistol hits shelves in California

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posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:05 AM
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Bellor
Emulating the encryption keys would be far beyond the capabilities of most people to the point of it not being worth it.

Personaly I like this idea if my gun is stolen it is rendered useless or in the event of a confrontation I cannot be easily disarmed and have my firearm turned against me. That sort of thing is important to me. I wish they would have employed subdermal RFID for the encryption but still, its a step in the right direction as far as I am concerned.
I need to ask. What thought process brought you to that conclusion??




posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:13 AM
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thisguyrighthere
reply to post by Expat888
 


Or people could not push ignorance as a viable alternative to education when it comes to children and guns.

But that's not PC so I guess it's broken $1,800 guns for everyone.
Then more parents need to take the time and responsibility to properly teach their children rather than just storing firearms in places where children find them. education starts in the home .. parents fail in their duty as parents when they dont properly teach their children. easier for them to cop out and blame others for their failure. with training thered be far fewer dying because of the failure of parents to take responsibility.. oops forgot in todays world people lack the intestinal fortitude to take responsibility for their actions ..



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:13 AM
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Bellor
Emulating the encryption keys would be far beyond the capabilities of most people to the point of it not being worth it.


While this may be true the gun is still essentially mechanical and very likely can be made operational without ever dabbling into the tech/encryption side of things.

If it has a trigger and a firing mechanism it can be made to fire regardless of how many microchips are in the way.

Now if the firing mechanism were "digital" as opposed to "analog" say by means of an electrical discharge or pairing a firing chip with an embedded ignition chip in the ammunition maybe physically defeating the protections could be prevented but if it's just a pin or hammer that has to hit a primer I'd bet any average Joe with some hand tools could render the "safety features" moot.


I believe this is the detailed patent info for the gun: Armatix Patent

It looks like it's just a typical 1911 style safety but inside the grip. Shouldnt be terribly difficult to alter, replace or defeat it despite the claims the company makes about destroying the gun or rendering it inoperable.

If every modder and tinkerer out their believed such claims we'd have to scene or hobby to speak of.
edit on 21-2-2014 by thisguyrighthere because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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Too expensive. I cant see the police having these, to unreliable, what if they need to draw their gun quickly, and it doesnt fire, the cop dies, then that would be the end of that gun



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:31 AM
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Not sure why Americans buy guns? They're NEVER going to use them, purposefully! FEMA camps awaits thee.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


First of all, RFID technology is about as reliable from a security point of view, as leaving ones safe buried under an obvious pile of dirt, on ones front yard. The reason I say that, is that there are already scanner devices out there that can read RFID chips in identity cards, credit card chips, mobile phone signals, car key codes, and all manner of other complicated and impressive sounding, but ultimately flawed and crappy technologies. Adding them to guns is going to have more of an effect on their price, than it ever will on safety.

I would also like to point out a second problem with this gun. It is unique in appearance, when compared with every other pistol I have ever seen in my entire life. As a person who has no practical experience of firearm use, the fact that I can say with some certainty that this is the only pistol currently available for sale, which looks even remotely like this one, means that any other nut who wants to get hold of a weapon, is going to recognise this item, and know that they will have to steal the watch which comes with it, if they wish to also steal the weapon.

And one more thing... this gun is priced OBSCENELY high! I very much doubt, that aside from the over the top security measures, that this weapon, when compared to another pistol on function alone, would be good enough to measure up to that price tag.

Why they could not just make after market parts to bolt on to existing weapons is beyond my comprehension, but this Buck Rogers crap they have going on is not going to win friends very quickly in my opinion.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 10:45 AM
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I like the tech but not the caliber or price. I wouldn't mind a .45 with that tech for a carry pistol. I have plenty of other weapons in my safe for WW3 if it ever comes to that, but I can see keeping something like that next to the night stand and not worrying about the kids.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by Expat888
 


Personal responsibility? Asking parent's to be actively involved in their child's development? What is this craziness you speak of?

I wish I could star your post more than once.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 11:05 AM
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Mirthful Me
Sheer jackassery... Precisely the kind of stupidity that Kalifornia deserves...

I'll tell you what, how about we switch the CHP, all the Sheriff' Offices and all municipal and city police departments over to this technology? No exceptions... All weapons regardless of unit (that means you HRT & SWAT) must have this technology, BUG's too. And let's go a step further, just to be fair...Any Federal agency operating in Kalifornia must also adopt this tech,,, Exclusively... And the nail in the coffin, any elected official, appointee, or employee of the state who carry concealed, or have weapons at home, those too must use this technology... Exclusively... Lead by example you jack booted Marxist thugs!

Needless to say, if such an imposition was made, this technology would be legislated into oblivion...


Yes, all with a .22lr.

I fear if this type of garbage becomes even remotely popular, it will end up being some sort of compromise in the not so distant future. BTW, I like your level of aggression. I think you got some spit on my monitor.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 11:06 AM
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$1800 for a .22? Really? And here I thought $350 for a new .22 pistol these days was a ripoff.

I don't see a market for this. Price is one thing, but practically speaking, it introduces another potential for failure. The police won't want it for that reason, and civilians shouldn't, either. The security it provides can likely be defeated by a thief with too much time on his hands, either by breaking, hacking, removing or otherwise disabling the lock. It would likely prove effective at preventing accidents in the home, but a $10 trigger lock can prove similarly effective if that's something you're worried about. And, of course, a good safe will prevent all but the most determined thief from ever getting their hands on your firearms to begin with.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by EyesOpenMouthShut
 





I need to ask. What thought process brought you to that conclusion??


To which conclusion are you refering?

reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


True, I imagine most knowledgeable gunsmiths could more than likely tamper with the security advertised and return a fully functioning mechanical gun. But that alone adds not only extra expense but added effort to achieve something that perhaps is not worth achieving?? especialy when there are far superior firearms out there that would serve illicit purposes far better?

reply to post by TrueBrit
 





First of all, RFID technology is about as reliable from a security point of view, as leaving ones safe buried under an obvious pile of dirt, on ones front yard. The reason I say that, is that there are already scanner devices out there that can read RFID chips in identity cards, credit card chips, mobile phone signals, car key codes, and all manner of other complicated and impressive sounding, but ultimately flawed and crappy technologies


This is not quite so true. My phone has the ability to communicate with the NFC standard, I can scan and capture the packets being sent/received from any other NFC standard I can even emulate/clone particular keys for my own uses. HOWEVER being able to capture the packets transmitting between a credit card and terminal in order to emulate/brute forace that signal?, good luck with that lol. If there was no authentication or encryption, sure, most of my house is automated with NFC that way, I will over time loose my keys, happend before so I dont bother, encryption on credit cards and encryption on something like a gun just isnt getting cracked.

Having said that however if you are a crypto enthusiast and have a couple of thousand dollars to spend on the hardware you would idealy require to carry out such an attack, go for it I guess.

Google PCI Data Security Standard
edit on 21-2-2014 by Bellor because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


I'm against violence, but wow, it looks pretty cool though.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 02:45 PM
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That's pretty cool.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


This design is years old. Back then they weren't able to overcome the recoil affecting the electronics hence the .22.

CLP would wreak havoc on that pos too lol.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 09:09 PM
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Apparently, and perhaps rather predictably, it didn't go over so well in their first attempt to put it on store shelves out in California. I guess it really does pay know your market. The fact is, anyone who knows this industry also knows that gun owners, whether you think they're justified or not, are going to absolutely hate anything like this.

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posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:51 PM
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LMAO! I am so not worried!

I hope everyone on this threads realizes they can make their OWN guns!

Stop putting money in the hands of anybody else [i.e. tax to the gov. Stop aiding the ENEMY!] and become self sufficient ok!

Get educated ... How to mill an 80% lower (google search)

Check your own local laws FIRST ok!

Stay Legal and Stay Constitutional!

Remain Patriotic and Get Educated!

Train Often and Write to your representatives and declare your OUTRAGE at them for using the tax code to disenfranchise everyone with gun restrictions and limitations.

Support the 2nd Amendment because IT covers Your A$$ets!

Be Well Citizens!


edit on 21-3-2014 by ZonedOut because: to add "them for" for clarity.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 11:48 PM
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And if the battery goes flat, let me guess...it won't fire.

I think this should be forced on the police for the first couple of years. After all, being shot with your own sidearm is a real problem for cops, IIRC.



posted on Mar, 22 2014 @ 12:57 AM
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No one i know in calif will buy one.

Just because the state wants to force people in calif to buy this type of junk the shooters in calif will reject it.

You also will find that gun stores will not carry them because they will not sell.



posted on Mar, 22 2014 @ 03:34 AM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by rickymouse
 


Not to mention the fact that if someone breaks into your house, now you have to take the time to grab the watch and key the pin number in to defend yourself.
Dude, read the OP, the PIN is programmed into the watch, it arms the pistol automatically when it's in close enough proximity to it, no manual input required.

I can only assume this is for private collectors, can you imagine the chaos this would cause if given military applications...



posted on Mar, 22 2014 @ 03:44 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


KISS (Keep it Simple, Stupid) sometimes is the best way to go. Sometimes technology needs to stay out of the way of tried and true. I don't need anything more extravagant than a good dog to alert me and my revolver. Lots cheaper, too.



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