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What will be the outcome for the 4 people who take the one way trip to mars?

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posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 06:02 PM
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Blue Shift

JadeStar

Blue Shift

HomerinNC
I would soooo go on this, except they wont take me for legal reasons.
BUT if they would, all I'd want is a flyer or something to glide over to Cydonia and check it out

Then what?

One could spend the rest of their life exploring Valles Marineris. It's a canyon 2,500 miles (4,000 kilometers) long whose beauty is beyond belief. It makes the Grand Canyon look 'meh' in comparison. [...]

I like to think I have a typical reaction to seeing the Grand Canyon.
"Sure is big and colorful! Time to go!"


If someone told you, "hey Blue, if you go down into that crevasse and find a few microfossils you win a couple million dollars of prize money" would you have the same reaction?
edit on 10-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 06:04 PM
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JadeStar

Cool. I'm just a student. An undergrad at that. That's awesome.


indeed.


The really sucky part was having to design for Mir's power input. My God, their power regulation sucked. STS power is nasty but it's nothing to what the Mir fed you. You could get 14 to 75 Volts, with some horrendous noise level, something like 1000mV, and you had to survive dropouts up to two seconds. And they wouldn't let me hum a battery in there to buffer the dropouts.



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 06:06 PM
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Bedlam

JadeStar

Cool. I'm just a student. An undergrad at that. That's awesome.


indeed.


The really sucky part was having to design for Mir's power input. My God, their power regulation sucked. STS power is nasty but it's nothing to what the Mir fed you. You could get 14 to 75 Volts, with some horrendous noise level, something like 1000mV, and you had to survive dropouts up to two seconds. And they wouldn't let me hum a battery in there to buffer the dropouts.


Why the hell not?

That would be the logical thing to do, to have a battery to buffer the dropouts. Why did they oppose this? Did you end up with something like a capacitor bank or something?

Also, how much power do the solar arrays on the the fully assembled ISS put out in kw? I've seen conflicting numbers but you'd certainly know.
edit on 10-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 06:27 PM
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JadeStar
Why the hell not?


MSFC design rules forbade it. Batteries go boom. So if you got to a point where you couldn't do without one, there was an agonizingly painful review board that could waive the rule. Maybe.



That would be the logical thing to do, to have a battery to buffer the dropouts. Why did they oppose this? Did you end up with something like a capacitor bank or something?


Yup. Up converted the input power with a boost converter to 350V, slapped on a block of caps, then converted down to board power with a flyback switcher.




Also, how much power do the solar arrays on the the fully assembled ISS put out in kw? I've seen conflicting numbers but you'd certainly know.


We didn't do any ISS stuff. Our last MSFC project was a high altitude aerostat instrumentation package we did with NASA and Space Command in 2004, after that we left for Pensacola and a semi-permanent Navy gig. I see what you mean about the conflicting numbers.



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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Blue Shift
I like to think I have a typical reaction to seeing the Grand Canyon.
"Sure is big and colorful! Time to go!"


I REALLY hope that's not a typical reaction. If it is one wonders how our species every crawled out from the mud.



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 12:56 AM
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Some of you and/or your kids may like this:




posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 01:51 AM
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Bedlam


MSFC design rules forbade it. Batteries go boom. So if you got to a point where you couldn't do without one, there was an agonizingly painful review board that could waive the rule. Maybe.


Ouch! Thanks for that story.


Yup. Up converted the input power with a boost converter to 350V, slapped on a block of caps, then converted down to board power with a flyback switcher.


What a pain. It's cool I thought of what ended up being your solution. I am not an electrical engineer by any stretch so I was just brainstorming based on what little I know.





We didn't do any ISS stuff. Our last MSFC project was a high altitude aerostat instrumentation package we did with NASA and Space Command in 2004, after that we left for Pensacola and a semi-permanent Navy gig. I see what you mean about the conflicting numbers.


So, my big question to you is, do you miss it?

Working with Mir I mean?

Also what do you think of Russia's plan to detach some of their modules to form their new space station at the time the ISS is being de-orbited in the next decade?



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 04:39 AM
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JadeStar

So, my big question to you is, do you miss it?

Working with Mir I mean?

Also what do you think of Russia's plan to detach some of their modules to form their new space station at the time the ISS is being de-orbited in the next decade?



Yep. I always miss stuff I used to do. The new gig is also fun, though, in ways I just can't explain. I'm actually ok with the Russians. I voted yes on them getting the unit for Mir, although it didn't count for anything. State was afraid that if it failed and killed them all we'd be scapegoats, they couldn't see an up-side, so it got #canned. Ok, I understand, but we never had a single failure over the life of the units and given all the problems they had with their own computer system I don't think they could have been any worse off.

I think NASA is governed by short-term thinking in some ways. Some of that is because Joe Sixpack is even less technically educated than he was in the 60s.



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 06:57 AM
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JadeStar
I don't know anyone who is igniting deuterium with lasers in their garage but if they are, more power to them!


DIY Fusion Source
It wasnt lasers my mistake but people are buidling home made reactors. I dont see how Lasers though would be too out the picture though most likley a tad bit more expensive.

JadeStar
I do know people with homemade wet labs in their kitchens doing their own genetic engineering/sequencing.
edit on 10-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)
Erm yeah.........*shifty look*......*hides his fluorescent Bactria colonys*
edit on 11-1-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 07:02 AM
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What would be the outcome? See bellow.


Space Madness


.



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 01:35 PM
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MegaSpace
What would be the outcome? See bellow (sic).

Space Madness


You have no link, but oh, well. It sounds like a movie title. It seems "space madness" is a projection of fear made by earth-bound people who have never been "up." It amounts to white-coated psychologists dreaming up every mental aberration that could or might be experienced, but, if fact, are not. People who "freak out" and are mentally unstable most often show their character early in life. It's not as if you'd have to guess how they would react to anything novel. Just look at the reaction here. Would you put the naysayers on the list of potential crew members? Most people at risk would self-select out anyway.

Indeed, it may be that people who are considered somewhat anti-social and more comfortable with a small social group might be far superior than sending up a "party animal" who needed more social stimuli. In any case it's obvious the temperament of an individual needs to be taken into account along with other physiological factors (bone density loss, exercise, etc.). It's yet another consideration that the planners have of course considered and really a non-issue in terms of deciding whether or not to go.



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 01:56 PM
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It will fail if the powers that be want it to fail. A spectacular in flight explosion by the military industrial complex so that they don't find out the truth about ancient civilizations there. Second theory, they make it and they are wildly successful. The whole earth watches and it is the biggest thing that ever happens to us and leads to colonization of the entire solar system. Theory three....they make it there but die. but in doing so they pave the way for Elon Musk to go and he does colonize the Red Planet!



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by flipflop
 


The trip would be amazing to experience for current man of EA*RTH so hopes all precautionary measures are secured.

It would be nice if self constructing equipment was on board that would unfold into the hospital-housing-working-entertainment -food growing / storage and waste disposal (which is very important to set the correct trend) a extra addition would be a miniature launch pad self constructing also that could launch the Travelers into MARS orbit specifically. MARS orbit for if scientific or other not considered mistake occurs would not want launch & travel capabilities to be able to reach direct EA*RTH space. But it would be even greater if a Support force was there that remained in orbit doing detailed studying/ testing from above MARS outside of MARS-Aries orbit and further study out into cosmos. So there would be ground team with orbit ability incase of emergency, space team with ground and space interaction tech and craft that can return to EA*RTH space from their Crafts.

If many things considered and secured it does seem like a nice experience would be nice to come back to EA*RTH though sometimes maybe doc near ISS. For quarantine and medical evaluation of MARS direct exposure to human body and mind.

Good Luck
edit on 1/11/14 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 05:11 PM
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It seems to me that an underlying assumption for many is that this venture MUST be essentially risk-free. The very possibility that something MIGHT go wrong seems an insurmountable deterrent for a certain segment of society which is not at all risk-tolerant. I think this is also exacerbated by the very public face of such an endeavor. With little comment or concern we tolerate about 40,000 deaths annually related to car accidents. Although it usually makes the local news, the apparent advantage of being able to drive automobiles all over the place outweighs the disadvantage of killing a few thousand people a year. It would seem our risk for tolerance is in inverse proportion to the number killed. Certainly technically this is true, but the publicity angle is probably more a determining factor.

The second issue that bothers people is that this trip as envisioned is a one-way voyage, yet people still speak as if the voyagers will come home some day.

That's NOT in the plan. They will stay on Mars permanently where they will eventually die. That is not a measurement of failure; it is a measurement of success. It is seminal to the whole idea. It's too expensive to bring them home again, therefore they won't be. To those people who cannot conceive not being on Earth, yup, that's a deal killer. But the point is that it is a deal killer for THEM, not for the people who want to go.

So let them go. They are willing to take the risks and they understand the consequences. And it's really none of your business.



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by flipflop
 


Please let one of them be a military "Major" named Tom...



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 12:00 AM
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BuzzDengue
reply to post by flipflop
 


Please let one of them be a military "Major" named Tom...



Ashes to ashes... funk to funky...we know Major Tom's a junkie...



posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by flipflop
 


I for one have taken a deep interest in the Mars Mission. These are new-age colonists, and I applaud them for their bravery. Just yesterday, I was reading several MSM articles on this topic from CNN, Huffington Post, etc., and it appears that they already have a 'short list' published. One candidate, a woman, is from my state of Tennessee. '

I also noticed that the statistics showed that about 300 of the short-listed candidates are American.



posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 02:55 PM
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QueenofSpades

I also noticed that the statistics showed that about 300 of the short-listed candidates are American.


Ok its doomed.......



posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 03:24 PM
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crazyewok

QueenofSpades

I also noticed that the statistics showed that about 300 of the short-listed candidates are American.


Ok its doomed.......


We're still pioneers. It's just that the frontiers are above and below us (the oceans) now.



posted on Jan, 15 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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JadeStar


We're still pioneers. It's just that the frontiers are above and below us (the oceans) now.


Im just worried you will try and take your guns



Jokeing by the way.





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