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[HOAX] Curiosity finds a couple of interesting rocks...

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posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 





Expensive device taking photos of rocks in other planet.

It's a science laboratory doing science and sending back great pictures from an interesting place , it's also doing a good job of showing that Mars may not of always been lifeless .



Biased attempt to implant the idea of a lifeless planet.

Mars may be a dead planet but I'm not convinced it's lifeless .



I don't eat NASA's breadcrumbs.

Each to their own , I salute them for successfully sending the rovers they have and giving me a chance to observe a planet I've been interested in since I was a kid from the comfort of my living room .




posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by arianna
 


Difficult to tell at the given resolution but it look almost basaltic except for some possible layering structure that may indicate ancient Alluvial depositing and the base shows some stuck dried mud were the top looks water eroded though the sand storms may also be to responsible the roundness says water flowing to me, interesting but nothing artifact like in the sense of what we find interesting.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 


I don't know what "great pictures" you are talking about....., deserts and rocks I have seen.

Certainly NASA's devices have the capacity to do more than that, there is no way I can believe they share all they find.

Certainly Mars is more than we've been told, otherwise NASA wouldn't be interested.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 06:31 PM
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Well, for me the large rock looks like the top half Homer Simpson, and the triangular rock seems to be leaning into the picture with raised eyebrows and s smile.

If you look at the lower rocks, there looks like some whitish-gray slate and lots of sea shells.

I wonder what caused the larger rock to fracture, frost damage? Meteorite damage?

The green color reminds me of the picture of that woman that was seen on Mars.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by arianna
 


So basically you doctored up some image and then you ran away like a cat? This is a worthless thread, and it should be treated as such. ~$heopleNation



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 09:47 PM
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Obvious hoax.

Post author has been banned.




posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 10:00 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Perhaps these papers and articles will help you out a bit?

Link



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by SkepticOverlord
 


lol...good job heisenberg



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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I think that the sideways Y looks like an ancient symbol I saw somewhere.
I think I have been studying ancient words too much lately.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by gortex
 


I don't know what "great pictures" you are talking about....., deserts and rocks I have seen.

Certainly NASA's devices have the capacity to do more than that, there is no way I can believe they share all they find.

Certainly Mars is more than we've been told, otherwise NASA wouldn't be interested.


The pictures have been interesting because many of them show visible signs that water once flowed in the location of Curiosity.

Having said that, the pictures are not the most important tools for the people studying Mars. The images help in giving them some context, and helps them find targets, but for the most part the real science is done with the suite of scientific instruments Curiosity is carrying:


The general analysis strategy begins with high resolution cameras to look for features of interest. If a particular surface is of interest, Curiosity can vaporize a small portion of it with an infrared laser and examine the resulting spectra signature to query the rock's elemental composition. If that signature intrigues, the rover will use its long arm to swing over a microscope and an X-ray spectrometer to take a closer look. If the specimen warrants further analysis, Curiosity can drill into the boulder and deliver a powdered sample to either the SAM or the CheMin analytical laboratories inside the rover.

Alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS): This device can irradiate samples with alpha particles and map the spectra of X-rays that are re-emitted for determining the elemental composition of samples.

CheMin: CheMin is short for 'Chemistry and Mineralogy', and it is an X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analyzer. It will identify and quantify the minerals present in rocks and soil and thereby assess the involvement of water in their formation, deposition, or alteration. In addition, CheMin data will be useful in the search for potential mineral biosignatures, energy sources for life or indicators for past habitable environments.

Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM): The SAM instrument suite will analyze organics and gases from both atmospheric and solid samples. This include oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars in order to distinguish between their geochemical or biological origin.

Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD): This instrument was the first of ten MSL instruments to be turned on. Both en route and on the planet's surface, it will characterize the broad spectrum of radiation encountered in the Martian environment. Turned on after launch, it recorded several radiation spikes caused by the Sun. On 31 May 2013, NASA scientists reported that a possible manned mission to Mars may involve a great radiation risk based on the amount of energetic particle radiation detected by the RAD on the Mars Science Laboratory while traveling from the Earth to Mars in 2011-2012.

Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN): A pulsed neutron source and detector for measuring hydrogen or ice and water at or near the Martian surface. On August 18, 2012 (sol 12) the Russian science instrument, DAN, was turned on, marking the success of a Russian-American collaboration on the surface of Mars and the first working Russian science instrument on the Martian surface since Mars 3 stopped transmitting over forty years ago. The instrument is designed to detect subsurface water.

Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS): Meteorological package and an ultraviolet sensor provided by Spain and Finland. It measures humidity, pressure, temperatures, wind speeds, and ultraviolet radiation.
Source

These instruments have found some interesting things, such as the presence of certain organic molecules that are the building blocks of life, and the presence of sulfates in the soil, which tells them that the area Curiosity is in was once very wet A picture doesn't tell them about organic molecules and sulfates.

Although, even pictures can help, such as the pictures from Curiosity of the ancient creekbed that showed pebbles that were probably rounded by running water.








edit on 8/13/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 09:12 PM
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Originally posted by gortex
reply to post by arianna
 


Cool picture , maybe its a feeding place for this Duck ....





edit on 12-8-2013 by gortex because: (no reason given)


Baby Graboid! I have seen a lot of Marsamals (my word) already in pictures. i believe some may be mineral eaters but clearly there are reptile and rodent types.




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