Man Sets Submarine on FIRE

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posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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www.cnn.com...



"Casey James Fury simply didn't want to be at work, and in the process cost the Navy nearly a half-billion dollars and one attack submarine.
Fury admitted to setting fire to the USS Miami, a nuclear sub, in May 2012 while it was in dry dock. He was sentenced to 17 years in federal prison in March and ordered to pay $400 million in restitution -- roughly the cost of the damage."


Seriously, ROFL!

This is the funniest # I've read in, well, EVER!

These are our best and brightest?

LOL!

edit on 8-8-2013 by Gemwolf because: Fixed title




posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 10:45 PM
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I suppose he was full of 'fury' and took it out on that poor ol' submarine.


What a clown, he didnt think he'd get caught?


mmmm.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 10:57 PM
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The Navy is really good at doing security screens of the contractors it hires I guess. A simple open minded confrontation with this guy should have sent up some flags. It didn't. Was this guy an employee of a contracting company, the company should be responsible for the damages, not the employee. We foot the bill that should have probably have been paid by his employer's insurance.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 10:58 PM
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Send him out to literally earn his time the old fashioned way. Make big rocks into little ones and give him $.05 for each one he whacks into shape that comes just right for someone's garden. Not too small. Not too large.

That should keep him busy to the last day of this sentence. What a fool. We really don't have THAT many to just toast one like a hot dog stand someone's pissed with. That impacts national defense readiness. All due to someone with issues. I wonder how many psych meds he was on?



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by teachtaire
 





These are our best and brightest? LOL!


Why did you use those words to describe the arsonist? He was a 24 year old painter why is he supposed to be best and bright?



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


They could also force the guy to work at "Subway" to pay off his bill



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


In answer to the unasked question (which someone is bound to ask): About 50+ Los Angeles Class attack subs--minus 1 now; some 20 or so Ohio Class ballistic subs (armed with nukes)....

edit on 8/7/2013 by Ex_CT2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


They could also force the guy to work at "Subway" to pay off his bill


Whatever--they'll still be dunning him for 45,000 years after he's dead.....



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:12 PM
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reply to post by Carreau
 


Anyone who you trust inside a submarine, I'd assume, would be one of your most trusted citizens. Just because you're a painter doesn't mean you're stupid. Leonardo da Vinci was a painter. Degas was a painter. Michelangelo. I could keep going.


They might put a tracking device somewhere.

Or a recording device.

Or a bomb.

Or flip out and light the thing on fire.

Actually, come to think of it, this man was probably paid to light the submarine on fire. That isn't funny.

Hm, odd how I find it funny if he just went ape #, but find it serious when I consider the possibility of direct sabotage. Still, it is absurd and tragic either way.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by teachtaire
 



How the Hell did he get Cold Hard Steel to burn?

I have a hard time envisioning a submarine on fire.

ESPECIALLY if it is in WATER.
edit on 7-8-2013 by ShadellacZumbrum because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by teachtaire
 


Richard Marcinko, who literally formed the original Seal Team Six had also run a 'Red Cell' team, which was US forces playing bad guys in 'almost' full scale sneak attacks for security testing. His first book was non-fiction (unlike his series that followed) and one was an assignment to go after a ballistic missile submarine in port on the east coast.

As I recall, they left a smiley on a simulated package or something like that in a reactor space. (They got Air Force One in California too, so it was a lot of examples of bad) It wouldn't shock me to learn security wasn't that much better now. Those guys were half way expected for a very general time frame in how it worked back then, too.

After all,. when we talk about them getting security clearances wrong? The politics of it don't matter to say a few recent high profile examples show whatever they use for basis on clearance, needs work. Lots of work.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


maybe he painted a layer of flammable material on everything.

Like powdered aluminium or some kind of nano accelerant.

If the man was a saboteur, he would have been given tools by his handlers.

Idk, not my area of expertise.

*EDIT*

or maybe some other guy did that ahead of time for him and he just had to start the fire.

Duhnduhnduhn.
edit on 7-8-2013 by teachtaire because: Hm



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


The actual super-structure wasn't on fire....you do know that there is an interior within right? That it isn't steel through and through?



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by Carreau
 


Funny picture! LOL!!!



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:44 PM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
reply to post by teachtaire
 


Richard Marcinko, who literally formed the original Seal Team Six had also run a 'Red Cell' team, which was US forces playing bad guys in 'almost' full scale sneak attacks for security testing. His first book was non-fiction (unlike his series that followed) and one was an assignment to go after a ballistic missile submarine in port on the east coast.

As I recall, they left a smiley on a simulated package or something like that in a reactor space. (They got Air Force One in California too, so it was a lot of examples of bad) It wouldn't shock me to learn security wasn't that much better now. Those guys were half way expected for a very general time frame in how it worked back then, too.

After all,. when we talk about them getting security clearances wrong? The politics of it don't matter to say a few recent high profile examples show whatever they use for basis on clearance, needs work. Lots of work.


That scares the hell outta me.

Who the hell is running COINT? They must be catching a lot of flak right now, poor fellas.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:50 PM
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Heck he only owes 400 million in damage? Why do they even bother making such a stupid statement? If he had 400 million dollars the last thing he would think of doing is setting a submarine on fire.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:53 PM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 




I do realised that there is an interior that is seperate from the exterior.

You missed my point.

Have look inside a submarine. There isn't much in there that is flammable.

In any event the halon (or either an inert gas, or carbon dioxide) fire supression should have put it out failry immediately. That makes me wonder how the damage cost came to $400 million.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:54 PM
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Dude, he could easily have claimed to be over taken by the fumes of the stealth paint or whatever he was supposed to be brushing.
I wish I was his layer id have the gov boys paying him for his damaged lungs and his ptsd......

Damage to burnt wiring id guess....even smoke and minimal overheat can damage some systems......(at least they get deemed less than operational.....so must be replaced entirely.....
edit on 7-8-2013 by stirling because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by teachtaire
 


What I still fail to understand is that

given that a sub is mostly steel . . .

and there are umpteen fire extinguishers every so many feet . . . and all manner of people supervising every group of XX people . . .

Just HOW did he manage to do that MUCH damage?



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


Do you have any idea how much flammable material there is on a ship? And the Miami was in drydock at the time of the fire, not in the water.

As for the decision not to repair her, that's bad news. Miami apparently had some special mods to allow her to do things other boats couldn't do. Now they'll have to mod another boat to take over that role.





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