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Nobody's Safe: 'Car Hacking' the Latest Advanced Form of Assassination

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posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:04 PM
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Nobody's Safe: 'Car Hacking' the Latest Advanced Form of Assassination


intellihub.com

It is now widely speculated that Hastings was possibly murdered by remote takeover of his car’s controls. In fact a new report from the University of California shows that vehicles are prone to hack attacks and could pose a safety risk.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:04 PM
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Others such as YouTuber, Mark Dice, have chimed in on this issue as well. Dice outlined in a recent video how it has been public knowledge for over 2 years that vehicle hacking is possible.



Modern cars can be hacked into and their brakes, accelerator, and other functions remotely controlled. Many believe this is what killed journalist Michael Hastings, who was going into hiding after writing about the NSA spying on Americans. Don't buy a high tech car, simple mechanical brakes will always work as long as they are intact.

intellihub.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 24-6-2013 by wasaka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:07 PM
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Nobody's safe? What about those of us smart enough to drive older cars that don't have all that computer crap? Dear leader can still drone me, but there is nothing on my vehicle to hack.



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:09 PM
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intellihub.com...


In their remote experiment, the researchers were able to undermine the security protecting the cellular phone in the vehicle they bought and then insert malicious software. This allowed them to send commands to the car’s electronic control unit — the nerve center of a vehicle’s electronics system — which in turn made it possible to override various vehicle controls.

“These cellular channels offer many advantages for attackers,” the report said. “They can be accessed over arbitrary distance (due to the wide coverage of cellular data infrastructure) in a largely anonymous fashion, typically have relatively high bandwidth, are two-way channels (supporting interactive control and data exfiltration), and are individually addressable.”



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:11 PM
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Buy a 70's muscle car and live free !!!

2nd.



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:17 PM
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Multiple threads on this already.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:20 PM
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This would explain some of what I was getting up from my "war driving" for fun in my last year or so on the truck. I have one of the Alpha external high gain antennas for Wi-Fi and it occurred to me one day that I had the ultimate job to just do an informal survey of what is out there for open routers. That alone is good for a whole different thread. What is relevant to here though is that I'd get repeated hot spots with odd heading data out in the middle of nowhere. The Interstate going to Quincy, Illinois one night for instance. I must have shown 8-10 short period hits on Wifi signals but type data which wasn't all that logical. Same in Nevada.

I'd wondered then if it might be the very cars themselves I was seeing occasional hits on since this was low level scanning it was doing. I could see into some of the cars which signal strength might suggest were among them (Truckers are sitting 6-7 feet off the ground) and many were not the 'tech' crowd types in the land of corn fields and other endless rows of whatever. Disturbing stuff, if true to this extent.



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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Who knows what actually happened, but it did seem odd the car burst into flames?



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:25 PM
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Originally posted by DarthMuerte
Nobody's safe? What about those of us smart enough to drive older cars that don't have all that computer crap? Dear leader can still drone me, but there is nothing on my vehicle to hack.


The "Nobody's Safe" was the title of the original article.

You're right... and like I said, "Don't buy a high tech car, simple mechanical brakes will always work as long as they are intact." However, if you have a GPS device attached to your car (or perhaps without your knowledge) or if you have a Smart Phone on your person, then you risk being tracked.

Question: is there a way to disable tracking devices built into a vehicles? (like on-star) I know you have to pay for the service, but I don't like the idea of having GPS built into my vehicle--even one I happen to rent. Whats to stop big brother from tracking my movement?

Answer: The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals just decided that it was legal for the police to put a GPS tracking device on your car, sitting in your driveway, on your property. Here's how to protect yourself. You could get a GPS jammer, which is technically illegal to buy and use in the US, so keep that in mind.

These types of GPS jammers plug into the cigarette lighter in your car, and will "prohibit GPS signal" up to 10 meters. Ten meters isn't too far, but it isn't super close either, so cars next to you might get some GPS interference as you drive down the road.

According to the Jammer Store the only model that stops all GPS transmission for the police—GPS L1, L2 and L5—is their model GJ6. The other GPS models, the cheaper ones, only stop GPS L1 and maybe L2, depending. But if you're talking about stopping EVERY GPS transmission, you have to use the GJ6, which is $430. This is the one that Micheal Hasting needed to have... it might have saved his life.



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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Scuse me folks but what about shielding like a faraday cage of some copper or different material around your cars brain?
maybe they couldnt get in so easy....
How about packing the box in a bunch of BRILLO pads?



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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I have another really radical fair market type solution. Since we're not all technophobic Homer Simpsons out here and those who are WAY above the norm can already figure this out, it seems ....How about we *ALL* get a nice USB port access to our own car's ..(Our own car) ECM and then perhaps even allow for added layers of security as we see fit on our own car.


I used to see what was coming up when I owned a truck for a couple years. Commercial truck type. The level of detail and precision was really something else. The fact it's usable against you in civil court too, in showing reckless driving or other recordable factors for a wreck is probably why most people don't even know that whole system could very easily be brought up on a tablet or laptop if makers cared to allow it. Adding Wi-Fi was sheer idiocy since it does far more than just display static data of course. Trucks, even years ago, could be 'kill switched' from dispatch offices across the nation with a few mouse clicks. Who knows on all cars when no one can see the settings easily?



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 08:23 PM
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I think all this nonsense is hilarious. First of all folks, I do not drive. If I did however, I do have a rule about what is, and what is not, a car. A car is machine which has one purpose. It gets you from A to B, faster than you could walk, and you do not have to wait for a time table to match up with your travel plans. Therefore, I will not need my car, when I finally buy one, to tell me where I am, where I am going, how to get there, where the speed traps are, or indeed what the weather report is going to be for the day.

Even the oldest hunk of crap I could pick up for a few hundred pounds, even the most deplorable piece of tosh is going to have SOME capacity to pick up local radio, and that is all a person with thier own independant brain and sense of direction needs. Early warning of crashes, and not much else.

Other than that, my rules are as follows:

1) If there is no chrome on the bumper, it probably isnt right to call it a car. These modern plastic things (I am twenty eight by the way: In before old fart comments) with thier ridiculous over designed shapes, and build quality that would digust even the most lackwitted engineer, are not fit to be called such.

2) If the pedal you press to accelerate, and the one you use to slow down are not directly attatched to the parts which make these things happen, then you shouldnt be driving the damn thing. Toyota proved it by ballsing up thier Prius braking system.

3) In short, if you are driving a car that has anything like an engine management computer in it, then you are driving a 1960s space probe with wheels, which might be all kinds of geeky fun, but unless you happen to have an electrical engineering degree, you are not going to be able to rebuild it when it breaks down, which makes you a mug. No offense, but who buys something as important as a car, which they HAVE to pay some stranger to fix when it goes wrong?

Not for me. When I buy a car, it will have chrome bumpers (fenders), and maybe running boards. It will have an engine that is made using the simplest possible design, with the most readily available parts, and will consist of no part which is not user serviceable. It will have an engine bay which can be accessed without having to resort to dealership only tools, or indeed the use of a palm pilot. It will be a simple mechanical device, which does not have delusions of intellect and will be under my control, and no one elses.

It will more than likely be painted matt black. The closest to high technology I might get when I finally get some money together to learn to drive, and get a car, is going to be the sound system. Lets face it, the combination of high chrome, matt black, and death metal is one that you just cannot pass up.



posted on Jun, 24 2013 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by DarthMuerte
Nobody's safe? What about those of us smart enough to drive older cars that don't have all that computer crap? Dear leader can still drone me, but there is nothing on my vehicle to hack.
I am not sure I am smart or too poor to afford a newer car!



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 06:43 AM
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In a way this thread is sensationalist bollicks at it's finest. For a car to be hacked to to the degree they are claiming is fairly, if not totally impossible.

Here's why;

Your accelerator pedal might be the new fly by wire type i.e. electronic link instead of a good old cable and your ecu might be able to be hacked, but neither of these units have wireless connectivity. So at best if it could be interfered with remotely it might jam and shut the car down.

If by some miracle your car was taken over you would still have brakes, unless your car has esp or esc fitted This would be the most dangerous unit to hack as it does have control over accelerator and brakes, but it is set to limit acceleration and stop skidding not jam on the accelerator or deactivate brakes.

But even then you still have 2 failsafes in most cars; the ignition switch with you key in it and when all else fails you will always have control of the steering and the handbrake.

For the paranoid, a great big manual kill switch in the car located within easy reach would solve everything; turn off the electrics manually and your rogue car shuts down and rolls to a stop.

So, sorry OP, but I will continue to drive my new car with all its electronic wizardry without fear of the machine rising against me.
edit on 25-6-2013 by markosity1973 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 06:49 AM
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Seems all these new 'advancements' and 'improvements' are leading to one thing: The complete enslavement and control of humanity.



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 07:05 AM
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This has been around for ages - there is speculation that the 'accident' that killed Princess Dianna was set up/triggered by remote access from a nearby vehicle/motorbike.



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 07:38 AM
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Originally posted by CrastneyJPR
This has been around for ages - there is speculation that the 'accident' that killed Princess Dianna was set up/triggered by remote access from a nearby vehicle/motorbike.


I'm rather sure that both these cars are Mercedes also. I worked on cars for years and they are bona-fide fly-by-wire for the right amount of money, and Mercedes aren't cheap. How about any recent recalls? Peace and Godspeed, Xenongod



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 07:47 AM
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I am fairly certain the Mercedes Hastings was driving had some type of OnStar system. I can tell you that with those systems alone, and the access they have to the car, they are able to do quite a bit. I have been in my father's Mercedes when he had them unlock doors and start the engine, and his is a 2001 model. I am sure at this point they have access to a lot more control in cars.

I also know OnStar touts having Stolen Vehicle Slowdown capability through its system, so why would the opposite not be available?




OnStar can force a moving vehicle to slow down to idle by electronically disconnecting the accelerator. OnStar can also prevent a vehicle from being restarted once it’s been turned off. OnStar has been used successfully to foil car-jackers, the company said.


Speed up the vehicle, keep the doors locked then slightly turn the wheels and voila....wreck.
edit on 6/25/13 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)
edit on 6/25/13 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 08:07 AM
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Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, accident happens all the time.





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