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United flight from Vancouver reporting mechanical issues,. Plane may not be able to steer upon landi

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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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hi just saw this breaking

this is the tweet

sry no more info yet

ok i guess it landed safely mods please delete
UPDATE: United flight 378 from Vancouver has landed safely at SFO after reporting mechanical issues. It's now being towed in
abclocal.go.com...
United flight from Vancouver reporting mechanical issues, it will soon land at SFO. Plane may not be able to steer upon landing
edit on 2-3-2013 by goou111 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by goou111
hi just saw this breaking

this is the tweet

sry no more info yet
abclocal.go.com...
United flight from Vancouver reporting mechanical issues, it will soon land at SFO. Plane may not be able to steer upon landing


Then what is the worry? If it can land, they will tow it once it does.....Planes can land in very extraordinary means...I see no uproar here as planes land in fashions that are not always reported.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:05 PM
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it's the cuts.

quick spend another trillion...



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


If it can't steer once it lands it might go off the runway, hit a terminal, control tower etc..

It's actually quite dangerous.

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:07 PM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Originally posted by goou111
hi just saw this breaking

this is the tweet

sry no more info yet
abclocal.go.com...
United flight from Vancouver reporting mechanical issues, it will soon land at SFO. Plane may not be able to steer upon landing


Then what is the worry? If it can land, they will tow it once it does.....Planes can land in very extraordinary means...I see no uproar here as planes land in fashions that are not always reported.


really they can land with no sterring? I thought steering would be rather important lol



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


If it can't steer once it lands it might go off the runway, hit a terminal, control tower etc..

It's actually quite dangerous.

~Tenth


What?! I am sorry but it might run off the runway (if say its front landing gear is locked at an angle; probably not) but do you want to know how far such buildings are in relations to the runway at SFO?

I never said it wasn't dangerous, but it is hardly as you have presented it.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by goou111

Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Originally posted by goou111
hi just saw this breaking

this is the tweet

sry no more info yet
abclocal.go.com...
United flight from Vancouver reporting mechanical issues, it will soon land at SFO. Plane may not be able to steer upon landing


Then what is the worry? If it can land, they will tow it once it does.....Planes can land in very extraordinary means...I see no uproar here as planes land in fashions that are not always reported.


really they can land with no sterring? I thought steering would be rather important lol


They land straight...why would steering come into play?!



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Planes don't just land straight on the runway, there's is much taxiing and turning required to line up the proper terminals and gates.

Google Maps View Of Runway

As you can see, they are liable to either go straight out into the ocean, or crash into the set of highways.

VERY dangerous. Probably not going to be an issue, but certainly is, VERY dangerous.

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 





They land straight...why would steering come into play?!


Well just because my car is driving straight when i let go of the wheel doesnt mean it stays straight



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:15 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Planes don't just land straight on the runway, there's is much taxiing and turning required to line up the proper terminals and gates.


Uh....they do so after they have controlled the landing and are at a safe enough speed to exit the runway onto the taxiway. If it has this type of mechanical problem it will make a full stop on the runway it lands and it will be towed off. Why are you arguing on something you are clearly ignorant on?


As you can see, they are liable to either go straight out into the ocean, or crash into the set of highways.


It is steering capabilities, not braking. In this case, ATC will clear the airspace and the airliner will land on the safest runway available that will be the least impact. You are sowing doom and gloom.


VERY dangerous. Probably not going to be an issue, but certainly is, VERY dangerous.

~Tenth


Slightly dangerous. Do you know how many landing happen outside the "OH MY GOODNESS" media?



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Get your car up to 300 miles an hour on a straight part of a highway. Come to a complete, safe stop without crashing into anyone or anything.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:17 PM
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Wouldn't a pilot need to keep steering it straight once they touched down as they deaccelerate, even before taxing back around and lining up for disembarking?



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, Calif. (KGO) -- A plane had to be towed to its gate at San Francisco International Airport after an emergency landing late Saturday afternoon.

Airport officials say United Flight 378 reported a hydraulic fluid problem after it took off from Vancouver.

Though they were initially worried that the plane would not be able to steer upon landing, the plane was able to safely land at SFO.
- See more at: abclocal.go.com.../local/peninsula&id=9013600#sthash.pzztk9kk.dpuf


Apparently you were right.

abclocal.go.com.../local/peninsula&id=9013600



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by goou111
 


United 378 uses an Airbus (Frogjet) 319, which is notorious for nosewheel problems. There are 2 ways to steer an Airbus on the ground. First, as with most aircraft, you can steer with your feet using the rudder pedals and brakes. On the 319 you are limited to 7 degrees of turn using the pedals. For tighter turns there is a steering tiller on the left side of the cockpit. The tiller gives you up to a 75 degree turn angle. There is a "pedal disconnect" switch on the tiller.For takeoff, pedal steering is effective up to about 130 knots speed. Same on landing. You steer with your feet until it's time to turn off the runway.


I wont get into the use of differential braking and differential power for steering.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 08:46 PM
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Originally posted by TFCJay
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Get your car up to 300 miles an hour on a straight part of a highway. Come to a complete, safe stop without crashing into anyone or anything.


Quite a different process my friend. Learn the mechanics of an airliner before you open your mouth; my god does the internet just breed ignorance?


Airliners are controled at low speds using nose wheel steering and differential braking, assisted by differential thrust if necessary. At high speeds (take off, landing) the rudder takes over.
Nose wheel steering is accomplished by hydraulicaly steering the nose landing gear. The control input comes either from a tiller in the cockpit or the rudder pedals, though rudder pedal input is limited to a few degrees. Rudder pedals and nose wheel steering get disconnected by an air/ground input and by retraction of the landing gear (to prevent the nose gear from moving in the wheel well). Some planes use an electric control input to the steering valve (A300-600, A320), others work purely mechanical (MD11, B737, B757). Steerring is achieved through a simple feedback servo mechanism.
Differential braking means you brake one side of the main landing gear harder than the other side. This is achieved by tilting the rudder pedals. Each pedal is connected to one landing gear leg.
Differential thrust means to power up one engine more than the other.


From Airliners.net
edit on 2-3-2013 by ownbestenemy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 08:53 PM
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Thank goodness it landed safely. I think safety inspections are due for the company. I believe most of them are known defects and they play a numbers game.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 08:54 PM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Originally posted by TFCJay
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Get your car up to 300 miles an hour on a straight part of a highway. Come to a complete, safe stop without crashing into anyone or anything.


Quite a different process my friend. Learn the mechanics of an airliner before you open your mouth; my god does the internet just breed ignorance?


Airliners are controled at low speds using nose wheel steering and differential braking, assisted by differential thrust if necessary. At high speeds (take off, landing) the rudder takes over.
Nose wheel steering is accomplished by hydraulicaly steering the nose landing gear. The control input comes either from a tiller in the cockpit or the rudder pedals, though rudder pedal input is limited to a few degrees. Rudder pedals and nose wheel steering get disconnected by an air/ground input and by retraction of the landing gear (to prevent the nose gear from moving in the wheel well). Some planes use an electric control input to the steering valve (A300-600, A320), others work purely mechanical (MD11, B737, B757). Steerring is achieved through a simple feedback servo mechanism.
Differential braking means you brake one side of the main landing gear harder than the other side. This is achieved by tilting the rudder pedals. Each pedal is connected to one landing gear leg.
Differential thrust means to power up one engine more than the other.


From Airliners.net
edit on 2-3-2013 by ownbestenemy because: (no reason given)


Your parents bred something. Ignorance comes to mind.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 08:56 PM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
Thank goodness it landed safely. I think safety inspections are due for the company. I believe most of them are known defects and they play a numbers game.


You believe? Care to back that up considering the massive amounts of flights of this aircraft that experience no problem whatsoever? The gear, its mechanics and electronics will be inspected but to inspect all other aircraft of the same type is a bit hysterical in my opinion. Considering it is a type that has been in service for years.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by TFCJay
 


Witty to say the least but you can doom and gloom this all you want. The airliner was in no immediate danger and safely landed as predicted. So if that is ignorance, keep living in your world of want of calamity.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Originally posted by Unity_99
Thank goodness it landed safely. I think safety inspections are due for the company. I believe most of them are known defects and they play a numbers game.


You believe? Care to back that up considering the massive amounts of flights of this aircraft that experience no problem whatsoever? The gear, its mechanics and electronics will be inspected but to inspect all other aircraft of the same type is a bit hysterical in my opinion. Considering it is a type that has been in service for years.



Right, because no other aircraft in history has ever had the entire fleet grounded because 1 problem was found on one particular plane. It happens all the time on land vehicles and those ones that operate at 35,000 feet.





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