United flight from Vancouver reporting mechanical issues,. Plane may not be able to steer upon landi

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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 09:07 PM
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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 09:16 PM
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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 09:25 PM
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Straight from my pilot buddy: At high speeds, rudder control will keep the a/c on a straight trajectory and should keep it straight enough while reverse thrust is applied. At that point, some veering may occur but not enough to run into terminals or control towers or into the ocean. Once slowed enough, standard nose braking and steering will be of no consequence.

His view of the event is that the plane was not in immediate danger since such a failure on this type of a/c is limited to the steering of the nose gear at lower speeds. Pilots train for these situations and can utilize the aircraft's characteristics to land the plane straight regardless of ability to "steer" it; even though such steering is achieved by aerodynamic forces rather than mechanical to a certain point.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 09:45 PM
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should keep it straight enough
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Should. But not always?



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 11:44 PM
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Originally posted by TFCJay



should keep it straight enough
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Should. But not always?


If this is supposed to be some profound counter it is lacking. Nothing is 100% and that is why people in these situations train for it. Should a plane get from point A to B as it should? Yes; always, sadly no. I am not sure your point here....



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 11:47 PM
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Originally posted by TFCJay
Right, because no other aircraft in history has ever had the entire fleet grounded because 1 problem was found on one particular plane. It happens all the time on land vehicles and those ones that operate at 35,000 feet.



Show me where the FAA or NTSB has recommended or acted upon grounding a fleet of aircraft models based on one incident; or even cars. I am talking about one incident as you are claiming. I am not saying whatever the company has discovered via testing or what an oversight agency has discovered through various accounts. I am talking about "1 problem" as you stated.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 07:02 AM
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