How to make a Seed Bomb !!!!!

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posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 05:36 PM
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3/4 c (200 G )
Compost

1 1/3 (350 g)
red clay

1c (240 ml)

water

mix it all together , roll the mix into little 3 -4 inch . balls

spread them out on a on a sheet to dry ,

launch ! them right before it rains !

, Oh and i almost forgot , make sure you pick a good seed to put into your mix , something that is indigenous to your area , (a hardy plant that won't require much care ) also be sure to hit "dry spots" so that you get the full maximum effect of the bomb !

and this folks ,is how you make a seed bomb ! Guerrilla gardening ! 101 !




posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 05:38 PM
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Do you plant it in the ground?

Sorry but I know nothing about gardening.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


Nope just toss it some where.

I'm going to do it this summer around my neighborhood. Maybe the deer will find that lettuce and stuff before they find my garden and leave some for me!



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 05:45 PM
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Cool, I will try this myself then.

Looking forward to how simple it sounds.

Thanks for the information!



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by LightningStrikesHere
 


Not being sarcastic. It just seems like a lot of work compared to poking a hole in the ground and dropping a seed in. But, there is an evil side to your bombs. Do you throw them on your neighbors' well-manicured lawns to ruin them?



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 05:50 PM
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You may want to read up on some of the plants,many require deeper depths for the seeds. Some seeds require 5" to 8" depths. Especially if the ground you put them in is solid.
If the ground is some what broken up, you will have a better chance.
edit on 2/23/2013 by mugger because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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You may consider mixing some pealing from the tubers of Jerusalem artichoke. New plants will grow out of it and once established, you wont get rid of it easily.

It's a species of sunflower, but the real threat is the tubers is food. You can harvest the tubers from October/November until spring so it makes a good survival food for the winter.

It might save your behind someday.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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reply to post by LightningStrikesHere
 


You know, all those seeds in close proximity to each other, when they sprout they all kill each other off due to the competition for rooting space. But it really doesn't matter, because they are sprouting on top of the ground and not in it, and so they all die before they get anywhere near leafing or flowering.

In reality, if you want to grow plants, which is a good and noble thing to do and I applaud you for wanting it, then learn how to garden correctly. You will waste less seed, kill fewer plants, and actually have results that you can be proud of.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:46 PM
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I've made some of these with wildflowers. The idea was to get them tossed to vacant fenced off dead looking spaces, the elements will erode the clay and disperse the seeds. They work and it's fun too!

...ps.. love that you put this in 'weaponry' !
edit on 23-2-2013 by Starcrossd because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:08 PM
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Originally posted by Hopechest
Cool, I will try this myself then.

Looking forward to how simple it sounds.

Thanks for the information!

Of course when Hushabye said "just toss anywhere" s/he wasn't referring to off your yacht. Toss anywhere towards bare soil is best.


I do this all the time, I get my kids to save all the seeds from thier fruit and every month or so we go for a drive and toss them out the _ They love doing it



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:12 PM
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reply to post by heyitsok
 


As for killing each other, one will survive. Many seedlings will survive with regular rain and they exert enough pressure for the roots to grow down into the soil. The reason we bury our seeds is to protect them from being eaten. Of course if you aim for lower spots, gullies and ravines you will have a higher strike rate. Seed is often in over supply anyway.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:23 PM
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Gardening is such a chore.

I've tried my hand at growing a garden. I put in the plant, water it, look after it, wait patiently for it to die, and sulk that yet one more of gods creatures has said "Screw this I'd rather die than be cared for by that human!".

And you think.. how hard can it be, really?

I don't see mother nature popping out at night to carefully poke a hole in the ground, place the seed, water it, weed the area, care for the seedling and wait for her to grow into a beautiful tree.

Naww, she just says "Right lads, drop your fruit." and bingo, a flamin' farm.

So I don't get it. If a fruit falls to the ground, is eaten by a scavenger, is pooped out 2 miles north of it, and it somehow managed to become a new plant, WHAT the hell am I doing wrong.

It's gotta be 27 degrees celsius on a tuesday during winter in the southern hemisphere, and only if the month ends on Y or L, and never after a full moon, near the equator, and you must use tap water as long as it has a sodium content lower than 0.000001ppm, with nitrogen added to it, to facillitate new leaf growth, and you can use potting mix, if you use water beades, and never put it in direct sun light unless it's in the garden, in which case it needs all the sun light it can get, in winter. And never let the soil dry out because it will dry out. And never saturate the soil, or it will become muddy and plants that grow in nature live in gerariums..

Just GROW damn it... stupid nature...

Ooh I forgot though, My Trich. cactus is happily bulging out of it's own skin as she grows taller and her pup seems to be getting bigger than her!

I can, at least, grow a cactus!!

lmao

edit on 23-2-2013 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 04:09 AM
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Originally posted by heyitsok
reply to post by LightningStrikesHere
 


You know, all those seeds in close proximity to each other, when they sprout they all kill each other off due to the competition for rooting space. But it really doesn't matter, because they are sprouting on top of the ground and not in it, and so they all die before they get anywhere near leafing or flowering.

In reality, if you want to grow plants, which is a good and noble thing to do and I applaud you for wanting it, then learn how to garden correctly. You will waste less seed, kill fewer plants, and actually have results that you can be proud of.


Well... That is your theory.. here is a picture of my mums veggie garden. She tosses dried out flowers out off sight so the garden looks crisp and clean without to much effort.. Every single flower you see in this pic (except for the roses) is a tossling. Nature does not need humans.




posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 04:27 AM
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Originally posted by mugger
You may want to read up on some of the plants,many require deeper depths for the seeds. Some seeds require 5" to 8" depths. Especially if the ground you put them in is solid.
If the ground is some what broken up, you will have a better chance.
edit on 2/23/2013 by mugger because: (no reason given)


What??? Which seeds are required to be planted at that kind of depth? Even potatoes aren't initially planted at that depth. Maybe 5" or 8" apart, but not deep. And, if the ground is solid, why would anyone want to plant a seed that deep? If the ground is solid, the seed would have a better chance popping up if it was planted at a shallower depth instead of deeper.

And average rule of thumb for planting seeds is about 4 times the thickness of the seed. For instance, say a seed was 1/4" thick; you could plant that seed 1" and it would come up just fine.

The seed ball idea is excellent. I read The One-Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka last year. He was a master at making and utilizing seed balls.


CX

posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 04:33 AM
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I am hopeless at gardening, so last year i just got loads of packets of cheap meadow seed, mixed them in a big bowl and scattered it all over my beds in the garden.

I had tons of lovey different flowers coming up all through the year. So if you don't want to do the bombs, just carry a bag of meadow seed and scatter it randomly.

Lovely idea the bombs are, i like the thought of barreling down a barren motorway, leaving a trail of flowers wherever you go.


CX.



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 08:10 AM
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Originally posted by D.Wolf

Originally posted by heyitsok
reply to post by LightningStrikesHere
 


You know, all those seeds in close proximity to each other, when they sprout they all kill each other off due to the competition for rooting space. But it really doesn't matter, because they are sprouting on top of the ground and not in it, and so they all die before they get anywhere near leafing or flowering.

In reality, if you want to grow plants, which is a good and noble thing to do and I applaud you for wanting it, then learn how to garden correctly. You will waste less seed, kill fewer plants, and actually have results that you can be proud of.


Well... That is your theory.. here is a picture of my mums veggie garden. She tosses dried out flowers out off sight so the garden looks crisp and clean without to much effort.. Every single flower you see in this pic (except for the roses) is a tossling. Nature does not need humans.




I can tell that not a single person on this thread other than myself, has any knowledge or experience growing anything. I can also tell you are all so enamored of your own naive beliefs that there is no dissuading you from the pointless endeavor of seed-bombing. So, have at it, and more power to ya. Enjoy accomplishing nothing while wasting a potential wealth of resources.



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 08:24 AM
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[snip]
edit on 16-3-2013 by elevatedone because: (no reason given)


CX

posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by heyitsok

I can tell that not a single person on this thread other than myself, has any knowledge or experience growing anything. I can also tell you are all so enamored of your own naive beliefs that there is no dissuading you from the pointless endeavor of seed-bombing. So, have at it, and more power to ya. Enjoy accomplishing nothing while wasting a potential wealth of resources.


Well i agree that you probably know more than me when it comes to gardening, i am rubbish.....however....

Last year i did scatter meadow seed.....my bare beds had tons of lovely and varied flowers....i had lots of nice compliments about them, including from a garden minded neighbor.....and i will be doing the same this year.


Maybe scattering is better than compact seed bombing?

I must admit though, i did read somewhere that are a few rules on seed bombing, and why it may not always be a good idea in some areas. Maybe that was about the "local plant" thing and them being harmful to animals.

Can't remember, i'll have to look into that.

CX.



posted on Mar, 14 2013 @ 12:25 AM
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i have dispersed blackberries and cherry tomatoes in different parts of local forest both came up the next season and the season after they were both growing thick and wild. i plan on keep doing this you never know when it might come in handy.



posted on Mar, 14 2013 @ 07:44 AM
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Seeds are the hard way...we just get the little plants already started...much easier.






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