How to make a Seed Bomb !!!!!

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posted on Mar, 14 2013 @ 07:51 AM
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Originally posted by Hushabye
reply to post by Hopechest
 


Nope just toss it some where.

I'm going to do it this summer around my neighborhood. Maybe the deer will find that lettuce and stuff before they find my garden and leave some for me!


That deer idea doesn't work. I talk from experience. Planting food for the deer only makes them decide to live right there and even if you have trained the doe to stay out of the garden, their young don't always do as they are told.




posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 08:58 PM
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Originally posted by heyitsok

Originally posted by D.Wolf

Originally posted by heyitsok
reply to post by LightningStrikesHere
 


You know, all those seeds in close proximity to each other, when they sprout they all kill each other off due to the competition for rooting space. But it really doesn't matter, because they are sprouting on top of the ground and not in it, and so they all die before they get anywhere near leafing or flowering.

In reality, if you want to grow plants, which is a good and noble thing to do and I applaud you for wanting it, then learn how to garden correctly. You will waste less seed, kill fewer plants, and actually have results that you can be proud of.


Well... That is your theory.. here is a picture of my mums veggie garden. She tosses dried out flowers out off sight so the garden looks crisp and clean without to much effort.. Every single flower you see in this pic (except for the roses) is a tossling. Nature does not need humans.




I can tell that not a single person on this thread other than myself, has any knowledge or experience growing anything. I can also tell you are all so enamored of your own naive beliefs that there is no dissuading you from the pointless endeavor of seed-bombing. So, have at it, and more power to ya. Enjoy accomplishing nothing while wasting a potential wealth of resources.


Did you see the pic with all the pretty flowers? Do you know the purpose of all that wasted seed bombed land besides looking wildly pretty? I give you a hint. It has something to do with not needing any pesticides, not having a bee shortage and having a big healthy compost heap.

What wasting of recourses are you arrogancing about?

Step over your fence for a minute and take a closer look. You might learn a trick or two.



posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by D.Wolf

Originally posted by heyitsok

Originally posted by D.Wolf

Originally posted by heyitsok
reply to post by LightningStrikesHere
 


You know, all those seeds in close proximity to each other, when they sprout they all kill each other off due to the competition for rooting space. But it really doesn't matter, because they are sprouting on top of the ground and not in it, and so they all die before they get anywhere near leafing or flowering.

In reality, if you want to grow plants, which is a good and noble thing to do and I applaud you for wanting it, then learn how to garden correctly. You will waste less seed, kill fewer plants, and actually have results that you can be proud of.


Well... That is your theory.. here is a picture of my mums veggie garden. She tosses dried out flowers out off sight so the garden looks crisp and clean without to much effort.. Every single flower you see in this pic (except for the roses) is a tossling. Nature does not need humans.




I can tell that not a single person on this thread other than myself, has any knowledge or experience growing anything. I can also tell you are all so enamored of your own naive beliefs that there is no dissuading you from the pointless endeavor of seed-bombing. So, have at it, and more power to ya. Enjoy accomplishing nothing while wasting a potential wealth of resources.


Did you see the pic with all the pretty flowers? Do you know the purpose of all that wasted seed bombed land besides looking wildly pretty? I give you a hint. It has something to do with not needing any pesticides, not having a bee shortage and having a big healthy compost heap.

What wasting of recourses are you arrogancing about?

Step over your fence for a minute and take a closer look. You might learn a trick or two.


I didn't say the land is wasted. I said the seed is wasted.

I have to confess that I used to try things like seed bombing too, and with very little success. I just did not get anything close to the results I get from planting carefully and thoughtfully. And I apologize that I came out against it so harshly, I really am sorry about my attitude. I just got flustered when people started telling me I don't know how nature "really" works. Nature is the only place I ever feel the slightest bit comfortable. Nature is my home.

I am a gardener. It is a passion for me. I do xeroscaping and herb gardening. I have a big healthy compost heap. Especially big right now, because here we save all of our autumn leaves for composting, as well. I use no pesticides, nor chemical fertilizers. Just compost and a few bags of horse manure. All clippings and trimmings go into the compost heap. And during the summer I tend to spend most of the day in the garden, every day. I have a very big garden. I also practice vermiculture composting. I plant mostly indigenous plants, and 95% perennials. What I raise that is not perennial is raised in containers. All of the soil is reused yearly and reconditioned with our own natural, organic compost. I don't like looking at bare dirt, but I also know to let the dirt rest in spots where it needs it. Last year one of my gardening projects was a 9' by 20' patch of absolutely dead, dried up, parched alluvial sand. No moisture, no humus, nothing living in it but the occasional weed. By summer's end I was practically mowing it, it was so lush from the wildflower seeds I sowed there, the soil conditioning, groundcover plants, pumpkins, squash, clover, columbines, yarrow, spinach, onions, anise hyssop, periwinkle, and miner's lettuce (my favorite.) And that is just what I planted in that plot. I have reintroduced earthworms to the vicinity to help with aeration and fertilization. I put out seed for birds to encourage them back into the area. I use melissa and bee balm and other flowers/herbs to bring bees into the area. And the yarrow in my herb garden I rub on my skin as a natural insect repellent.

If you are wondering what killed off that plot in the first place, it was a lawn which turned to sand when the previous caretaker stopped watering it. I really do not like suburban-type lawn grasses. I prefer my land wild and my gardens thoughtfully cultivated.

In random city plots, there is just not the wildlife present necessary to control the plants or spread seeds around. Without grazing animals around, no matter how many varieties of flora you plant (or seed bomb,) eventually all but one will pretty much die out. You will end up with almost a monoculture of one single plant, whichever one is most suited to the amount of water/pollution/sunlight is present in that plot. The best plant wins, and chokes out all the rest. Think about the side of the freeway. Not watered, not cultivated, just one plant.



posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by D.Wolf
 


You are right, I did act like a jerk, and I apologize.

But I'm not arrogant. I know I have a lot to learn.

I also know nature doesn't "need" human intervention to flourish.

However, nature also doesn't grow much food per hectare. Nor does nature tend to produce nice, diverse, healthy gardens on city plots. Not without help. That is where we come in. If we don't garden it, some creep will pave over it and put a macdonalds there. Is that something you want to leave to chance?????



posted on Mar, 16 2013 @ 10:29 PM
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Hmmm interesting, sounds like fun...thistle, poison ivy, thorny locust , nettles, golden rod,muliflora rose

if you're gonna make seed bombs, make seed bombs



posted on Mar, 17 2013 @ 08:16 AM
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i do find it interesting and a little humourous, going around and planting veggies all over the neighborhood lol.





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