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The 7 Types of Gear you MUST have in your B.O.B.

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posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 11:43 PM
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Thanks Slayer for bringing this back into the limelight. It's so easy to become complacent even of those who have bags at the ready. We change out our bags for the seasons and keep ones in our vehicles as well as a main bag at home. Ours is the Get Home Bag. Whats it gonna take to get from point B back to home. Know alternative routes and over terrain routes to get us home. Extra socks, natural wool, not cotton! These are a must. Even on short treks you need to change out your sock and let the dogs air dry before rebooting. I keep boots in the vehicle in case I gotta change from work snazzy to trekking it. Made sewing and fishing kits. And know how to make a Dakota hole for a low profile heat and cooking source. We practice dryer lint and mag stick fire making a couple times a year. And the P38s on our key rings will keep us from lugging a can opener when its tuna time.
Thanks for the LifeStraw tip, that beats figuring out water volume and tabs anyday. I dehydrate foods on a regular basis and keep at least 2-4 meals in each bag.
Rule of 3s. 3 min without Air, 3 hours without Shelter, 3 days without Water, 3 weeks without food.

One thing I have done, is listen to the Survival Show on Thursday nights. It has changed my mindset to be aware of my surroundings, and who is in them, what gear is effective and which is not, and the humor makes getting focused on serious matters a bit more palitable.

Luck to each of us if we are ever faced with a situation whether natural or man made that we come out alive and well because we had the forethought to prepare to take care of our selves instead of slumbering through the latest version of song and dance on the idiot box.
edit on 12-2-2013 by SunflowerStar because: sing song




posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:04 AM
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reply to post by SunflowerStar
 


Well thank you for your input.

It's refreshing for me to get as many different perspectives, opinions and suggestions as possible.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:32 AM
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Alrighty then...


My Box Of Beer is packed and ready to go:





Now what ?



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:49 AM
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reply to post by CranialSponge
 


Don't you remember what your 2nd grade teacher taught you about sharing?

If you didn't bring enough for the rest of the class don't bother bringing any at all.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:24 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Whatdya mean ??

There's 12 packed... I only need 7 apparently... so the rest of the class gets the other 5.

See ?
I share.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:30 AM
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Couple odd items there such as the baton, glass breaker, easy loader (or whatever its called) for your pistol mags, shooting glasses, way too many writing utensils etc... you could easily get rid of 1/3 of those items and add some more usefull stuff. Did I see a sight adjustment tool?

Anyways, not dogging on ya but you should maybe put in more items such as a water straw, food, a wool blanket, crank radio/light and work on your med kit, just as an example. If my hand wasn't broken I would really like to post some picks of my BHB... bug home bag. Great post though

edit on 13-2-2013 by SnakeShot because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:55 AM
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reply to post by CranialSponge
 




I like your math 2 for me, 1 for them...



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 03:27 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


should have a wrist rocket (slingshot) all the ammo you need you can pick up, good enough to kill/stun small animals to eat, or scare away bigger ones such as dogs ect. has good distance and weighs less than a pound, can also use the surgical tubing for other things as well.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 03:30 AM
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reply to post by CranialSponge
 


thats only 12, what are you going to do for the 23 hours ^^ let alone week hehe, you should got the beer MAKING kit, then you could drink all week.


teach a man to fish... get him drunk the rest of the week.
^^



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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If you're lucky enough to be able to leave your area via car, there are a few things you can keep in it as an addition to your BOB.

First of, you'll want to know how far you can go on 1 tank of gas. you probably won't be able to stop at a Chevron for a fill up and a Pepsi. Have a map with your destination highlighted, avoid interstates and highways if possible, there will be much less traffic on country roads.

Second, make sure you're always up to date on vehicle maintenance. Have a good tool set, you can usually get a good ratchet/socket set with metric and SAE sockets, a few wrenches, and some screwdrivers for around $60. If the repair you're doing requires more, it's best to move on to foot or bicycle.

Third, make sure you have a full-size spare, keep the donut if you have room, but don't rely on it for your spare. Get a good 1-ton floor jack, you can get a decent one by GM Goodwrench for around $35 at any parts store, also get a four way lug wrench, makes for faster changes.

Fourth, have a larger first aid kit in the trunk, when you discard your vehicle, you can take most of it's contents with you.

Most of these things should be in your vehicle anyway.

I'm not saying you'll be lucky enough to use your car, if you live in an Urban area you most likely won't. But, all of these things should be in your car anyway, as you never know when you'll end up stranded. A few MRE's would be good to keep in your car just in case anyway, especially if your travel by car often.


You should always know where you want to but out to. Find 3 locations that you can get to with less than 1 tank of gas. Take a weekend or two to go out into the country and find a place. State parks can be good for this, if they're large enought. Don't bug out to a common picnic area.

Buy a county or state map that shows all roads, including fire roads, and has topography lines.

Well, that's about it, wanted to add something, but couldn't think of anything to add to the actual BOB.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 11:35 AM
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Thanks for the reminders!
I have been thinking it is time to overhaul again and at least double check everything.
Keeping it back to the basics, I would like to share my firestarters again.
I take egg cartons fill them with dryer lint and melt down old wax pieces to pour over the cups of lint. Even crayon wax works. These will start a fire with wet kindling and continue to burn long enough to start a birch quarter round (in the woodstove). They are super cheap or free to make depending on where your wax is coming from. They last forever and take a beating in the backpack without falling apart. It is one surefire way of having tinder under any circumstances.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 



I'm not a "Hand Gun" guy. I prefer rifles.
More insidious if the situation warrants.


True, but a rifle is a lot harder to conceal and carry in a bug out situation....whereas a pistol can fit in your kit.

This (the OP) is one of the best and simplest threads I've seen on a BOB by the way, congrats. When I first put one together (my BOB), it was ridiculous, I have to admit. I've since scaled it down less and less, and tried more to gear it for a 4 day survival (about the time it would realistically take me to walk home from work....I have a good commute). I keep it in my truck (which is always near me).

The only thing I'd add as an essential (and it's likely been said), is a map. I have a map I made detailing a couple of alternate routes home, possible holdup spots along the way, and possible loot points along the way (in a SHTF scenario), as well as gas stations, etc. These are printed maps in page protectors, that I then heat-sealed along the edge, to make it fairly waterproof, but still pliable. On one side is the road path, on the other, a satellite view of the same (helps you see where you could do on-foot shortcuts). With the sat view, it's also easier to see exactly where you are along the route, though I also indicated landmarks.

I'm constantly needing things out of it for little everyday occurrences (like the other day, when my wife needed some water for something, and I was able to surprise her with it out of my kit...that she always does an eye-roll about)... Of course, I always replenish what I use.


I'm in the process of putting one together for her truck also. She's always home, so hasn't been as much of a priority, but no harm in a little more preparation (and it doesn't need a 4 day supply).
edit on 13-2-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by ~widowmaker~
 


wrist rocket; do you plan on eating sparows after the SHTF. and you can't just pick up good ammo anywhere. i had a wrist rocket as a kid and it took a while before birds feared my footsteps



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Great thread! I wanted to ask if you think those wind up flashlights are a good idea? Tampons are good for bullet wounds and RV water filters are about the size of a water bottle and will last a long time. You can connect it to a hose or faucet or just pour the water in and catch it when it comes out.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:03 PM
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..........Thread Update..........


Great debates going that are topic related....


The reasons why your "bugout plan" will absolutely fail!

AND

wThe reasons why your "bugout plan" will absolutely WIN



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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As a retired Special Forces Officer I have some differing views on these type things that have evolved over the years.

When I was a younger man I'd pack all manner of items just in case. A lot of stupid crap to be honest. Often loading out at 80-90lbs plus of # for a 96 hour mission. However, one must understand that a good portion of those things were mission essential and often different depending on the operation.

I was an 18C at first so I had all manner of detonators, composites and different kinds of destructive things that go boom (cord/C4/Thermites/Smoke/and frags) along with short range commo gear and personal ammo for my primary and secondary weapons and sometimes 60mm mortar rounds if we had one for the mission (we all carried 6 or so rounds).

As I got older I carried less and less of the things I’d like to have and just toughed it out comfort wise to save weight as age took its toll on the back and knees.

Weapons were a primary M4 or MP5 (depending) and as the 18C breach man I had a tactical shotgun along with two side arms and breaching loads. Personal night vision devices were a must along with the various batteries to power the devices.

However, later as an Officer it changed to mostly radio equipment and back up medical supplies along with a good mix of random mission items cross loaded for redundancy. My personal weapon at that point was primarily the MP5 as I didn’t shoot all that much - I spent more time leading than fighting. However, I often carried the SOCOM M1 (as my choice) because - well I could and as a former sniper my mid-long range skills came in handy if needed.

We learned in SERE to carry things in layers that could be shed if needed from ruck to LBE down to our uniforms eventually and if necessary even them for local clothing and some personal items in the pockets if we needed to move more quickly.

In the rucksack were personal comfort items (Sleeping bags, stoves, extra ammo, and heavy items like long range commo gear and MREs or long range rations stripped down for weight mitigation.

If you had to run you could in effect drop all that # (rigged to blow with thermite and or C4 on a timed fuse between 30-60 seconds for a nasty surprise sometimes a claymore) and still have in your load bearing gear.

Inside of that is basic load of ammunition short range commo along with a GPS and basic first aid packs along with a second side arm and some frags and smokes for signaling. A few energy bars and another few main meals could be carried in the pouches along with the personal hydration and filtration system for water. A poncho liner and or field jacket liner will stuff into a small pouch. The ballistic plates and eventually the vest can be dumped as well as weight becomes an issue.

Final layer was inside your actual pockets of the uniform - maps the area local and to the nearest international boarder, a Silva compass, the emergency transponder goes into the top pocket of the uniform with a lanyard around the neck so it can’t be lost. A hip rig with your final sidearm and a few mags (4-5); energy bars in a belt pouch and a hydration system next to your back along with filters. Some fire making equipment, perhaps some wire for a snare or two and fishing line sewn into the lining of a shirt and a space blanket.

Also, we carried a fair amount of local currency and gold coins to barter for safe passage and assistance in extraction and bribes.

You can shed things in layers to pick up speed and combat fatigue.

Not really a BUG out plan more of a combat E&E but perhaps it will help someone.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:58 AM
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Originally posted by Golf66
As a retired Special Forces Officer I have some differing views on these type things that have evolved over the years.

When I was a younger man I'd pack all manner of items just in case. A lot of stupid crap to be honest. Often loading out at 80-90lbs plus of # for a 96 hour mission. However, one must understand that a good portion of those things were mission essential and often different depending on the operation.

I was an 18C at first so I had all manner of detonators, composites and different kinds of destructive things that go boom (cord/C4/Thermites/Smoke/and frags) along with short range commo gear and personal ammo for my primary and secondary weapons and sometimes 60mm mortar rounds if we had one for the mission (we all carried 6 or so rounds).

As I got older I carried less and less of the things I’d like to have and just toughed it out comfort wise to save weight as age took its toll on the back and knees.

Weapons were a primary M4 or MP5 (depending) and as the 18C breach man I had a tactical shotgun along with two side arms and breaching loads. Personal night vision devices were a must along with the various batteries to power the devices.

However, later as an Officer it changed to mostly radio equipment and back up medical supplies along with a good mix of random mission items cross loaded for redundancy. My personal weapon at that point was primarily the MP5 as I didn’t shoot all that much - I spent more time leading than fighting. However, I often carried the SOCOM M1 (as my choice) because - well I could and as a former sniper my mid-long range skills came in handy if needed.

We learned in SERE to carry things in layers that could be shed if needed from ruck to LBE down to our uniforms eventually and if necessary even them for local clothing and some personal items in the pockets if we needed to move more quickly.

In the rucksack were personal comfort items (Sleeping bags, stoves, extra ammo, and heavy items like long range commo gear and MREs or long range rations stripped down for weight mitigation.

If you had to run you could in effect drop all that # (rigged to blow with thermite and or C4 on a timed fuse between 30-60 seconds for a nasty surprise sometimes a claymore) and still have in your load bearing gear.

Inside of that is basic load of ammunition short range commo along with a GPS and basic first aid packs along with a second side arm and some frags and smokes for signaling. A few energy bars and another few main meals could be carried in the pouches along with the personal hydration and filtration system for water. A poncho liner and or field jacket liner will stuff into a small pouch. The ballistic plates and eventually the vest can be dumped as well as weight becomes an issue.

Final layer was inside your actual pockets of the uniform - maps the area local and to the nearest international boarder, a Silva compass, the emergency transponder goes into the top pocket of the uniform with a lanyard around the neck so it can’t be lost. A hip rig with your final sidearm and a few mags (4-5); energy bars in a belt pouch and a hydration system next to your back along with filters. Some fire making equipment, perhaps some wire for a snare or two and fishing line sewn into the lining of a shirt and a space blanket.

Also, we carried a fair amount of local currency and gold coins to barter for safe passage and assistance in extraction and bribes.

You can shed things in layers to pick up speed and combat fatigue.

Not really a BUG out plan more of a combat E&E but perhaps it will help someone.



Thanks for this post. It was a much needed breath of fresh air - someone posting knowledge from their experience! I found value in it, thanks.

I do find it very interesting the military acknowledges the value of gold. What kind of coins were they? Unmarked bullion?



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by Philippines
Thanks for this post. It was a much needed breath of fresh air - someone posting knowledge from their experience! I found value in it, thanks.


You are welcome.


Originally posted by Philippines
I do find it very interesting the military acknowledges the value of gold. What kind of coins were they? Unmarked bullion?


Special Operations is a very different beast than the regular Army. You are not going to find infantrymen being issued gold coins (almost universally negotiable) and/or cash just in case.

However, in Special Operations our operators and pilots are given these and currency because safety can be purchased in a lot of circumstances. Don't get me wrong you certainly don't want to get caught at all because the captors can just as easily have both you and all your stuff. It was primarily for once you got out of the combat area and into a friendlier place. Base line was 4 1 oz gold coins and 1,000.00 in US dollars along with some local currency. Pooled together assuming a whole team was alive still it would be about $100,000.00 at the current market price for gold. 12 men can get pretty far on that.

As for type of coin it really depended on the operational area and was it a clandestine or covert operation. In a clandestine operation US Eagles were fine as we’d be in uniform and obviously Americans. Covert operations required the creative use of different coins depending on the cover being used. The coins and currency would reinforce the cover.

You can only imagine the accountability drill every time we went somewhere and I assure you there were no - "#, I lost my gold" incidents. Primarily they were sewn into belts anyway so unless you lost your pants it’s pretty much impossible. Then there was the zero tolerance - you lose it you buy it. Since 4 oz of gold is about what a Major or Senior Captain makes and way more than any Enlisted man makes in a month no one was losing them. Never happened.

Money however was very freely flowing. You'd be surprised what kinds of money I had when operating my little base in the beginning of the Afghan war. Back in 03-4 when the only people in country were Special OPs. A literal pallet of cash actually. Mostly 20’s though as that is a fortune for a local. Don’t let that set off your anti-government waste filter though because I assure you some bean counter was flown in to check the paperwork and count the money more often than we got mail service….

We bought information, paid the our Afghani forces a salary bought weapons, horses (which were a godsend in navigating the mountains), goats (mostly we ate them), trucks, we even bought 2 D30s (122mm soviet arty piece) for our compound with 1000 rounds that we used to good effect against the Taliban. We bought a 240mm mortar only to find out it was beyond repair. That would have been ideal for use in the mountains.

I once had a Car flown in for some tribal big wig. No idea where he was going to drive it (no way it would make it on those dirt roads) or where he'd get gas for it but a used 1970s Cadillac convertible got him and his 130 fighters to be on our side so I call it a win. I had to get very high level authority for that one I assure you. For all I know it's still sitting inside his courtyard where the bird sling loaded it.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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I am not a medical doctor but do work in the Veterinary Medical field...
Here's some info on how to stock up on antibiotics. I could but
will not post dosages since I'm not a doctor. You can look that up
yourself on line. You can purchase antibiotics sold as Veterinary
Pharmaceuticals legally on-line & they are legit. .
It's all human grade go research it for yourself....




Every “drug” manufactured, sold, or brought into the United States must pass FDA regulations (don’t get me started on the FDA), and is listed within the United States Pharmacopeia, or USP. This is a compendium recognized officially by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that contains descriptions, uses, strengths, and standards of purity for selected drugs and for all of their forms of dosage.





Per the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (edocket.access.gpo.gov...), each capsule, tablet, or pill must be uniquely marked. Two tablets with identical colors, shapes, and markings cannot, by law, have different ingredients. This is for a variety of reasons, but not limited to assisting Poison Control hotlines, hospitals, doctors, etc., in determining what someone might have ingested, overdosed on, or is causing side effects.


Cal-Vet Supply

Fish Mox = Amoxicillin 250mg
Fish Mox Forte = Amoxicillin 500mg
Amoxicillin - Bladder Infections, Pneumonia, Ear Infections, E Coli, Samonella,
Gonorrhea
Fish Pen = Penicillin 250mg
Fish Pen Forte = Penicillin 500mg
Penicillin - UTI (Urinary Tract Infections), Septicemia, Meningitis, Pneumonia,
Respiratory Infections, Ear, Nose & Throat Infections, Skin & Soft Tissue
Infections,Intra-Abdominal Infections, Syphillis & Gonorrhea
Fish Flox Forte = Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) 500mg
is a Fluoroquinole potent broad spectrum antibiotic which can be used to
prevent or slow Anthrax after exposure
Fish Flex = Cephalexin 250mg
Fish Flex Forte = Cephalexin 500mg Cephalosporin antibiotic
Upper Respiratory Infections, UTI Infections, Tooth & Oral Infections,
Skin Infections & Ear Infections
Bird Biotic 100mg = Doxycycline - Tetracycline antibiotic ***Use with Caution***
can cause Liver damage & IS TOXIC after experation date
UTI, Acne, Lymes Disease, Anthrax, Periodontitis (gum disease)
Cholera, Chlamydia & Gonorrhea

Regular Fish stores sell Metronidazole (Flagyl) in 250mg tabs...

I hope this information will help benefit some of you ATSers.

Cheers
Ektar

You may want to include a few surgigal blades in your bag, extremely
light weght & would even fit in a pill bottle with other stuff.

Source www.truthistreason.net...



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 09:34 AM
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For me, since the BOB is a way to get home (an hour drive, so could be a few days on foot), I plan for this scenario.

Some other essentials...(for my situation)

SOMETHING TO BARTER WITH - Some currency (for a slight SHTF situation, where normalcy is expected to return soon), cigarettes (I don't smoke, but easy to trade), and extra ammo (.22, I have way more carried than I'll actually need for the trip, it's small, cheap, and easy to carry).

INSECT REPELLENT - I'm in FL, so over a few days walking outside, without this I'd be covered in bites.

PONCHO - It can rain like crazy here, so this is a necessity (one of those cheap, thin ones is fine, and easy to carry).

MILITARY CAN OPENER - Small and compact, but foraged food may need a can opener

CANNED FOOD - MRE's may be a fave, but they are expensive (per meal), whereas a few canned goods are sturdy, can be heated in the can over a fire, eaten out of the can, and are cheap. It's only for a few days.

HAND WIRE SAWS - Cheap, small, and easy to use, these things are great, they wear down quick though, so don't just have one, great for smaller branches where a folding saw would be overkill.

FOLDING CAMP SAW - Like the above, but use for thicker branches

I'm personally a big fan of items that have a ton of uses in one thing. Examples...

MULTI-TOOL - Think pliers meets a Swiss Army knife

HAND CRANK RADIO/FLASHLIGHT/CELL CHARGER - This thing is just cool, and very compact.

SURVIVAL KNIFE - Besides being an essential knife, has all kinds of goodies in the handle, including a compass.

DUCT TAPE - So many uses, camo of course, makes quick shelters a breeze.

The scenario will determine if I travel by day or by night, if I have to go on foot.





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