Beekeepers Expect "Worst Year For Bees, We’re Facing The Extinction Of A Species.”

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posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by mountaingirl1111
 


but boy, did I see wasps. I saw a kind of wasp I had never seen before, either, a very large shimmery blue kind, almost looked like metal. They got into our garage all summer and were very, very aggressive.

That could be a Tarantula Hawk. They tend to burrow in the ground though. Maybe it was one of these...

Blue mud dauber wasps

They make small tubular nests of mud and they love to be indoors or under eaves. Not usually aggressive unless disturbed. But I don't know about yours.


Thanks
Def not the first, the color of the second, but the ones we had were much fatter, maybe an inch long? They were very aggressive and very loud, loud buzzing sounds and loved to buzz the overhead garage opener light. They also seemed very off-kilter, bumping into things, etc., and that seemed like their normal behavior. I never saw anything like that until last summer. We had normal wasps and then these things seemed to show up maybe around July. I'm not saying they weren't the second kind, but I just don't know because the picture seemed to show a wasp much thinner in the thorax; ours were very meaty looking. Thoughts? Thanks!




posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


ive also read that a wasp is not a bee
but who knows if im right, much love !



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by mountaingirl1111
 

Sometimes its easier to identify the type of wasp or hornet from the kind of nest they build... any familiar?

Blue wasp nests



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:33 PM
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Very strange...sort of worrying when humans seem to be an indirect/direct link to so many species of animals becoming extinct, when will it stop



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:45 PM
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When I was a child there were bees everywhere. They'd often attack me on my bike.

I honestly doubt that I saw more than 2 or 3 bees all of last summer.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:47 PM
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reply to post by exitusstatuquo
 


I think it was Einstein who said, ONCE THE BEES HAVE GONE, HUMANS WILL HAVE ABOUT FOUR YEARS!!!!!

(Sure it was Einstein) Probably where your Dad got it from.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:59 PM
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This thread is the most important one!!
When the bee colonies collapse then it is over!!!!


Then This Is Us !!


And That Is Our Tool !!

It may looks funny but i can assure you that it's no joke at all



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by mountaingirl1111
 

Sometimes its easier to identify the type of wasp or hornet from the kind of nest they build... any familiar?

Blue wasp nests


I found this, it's closer, and the description people left of them at the bottom seem right-on!

www.pbase.com...

www.flickr.com...



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:24 AM
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You know the honey bee is not native to America....

I believe it was a virus that wiped so many out...especially in China where they are native and people need to hand pollinate. I hope we figure it out....

edit on 23-1-2013 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by Xtrozero
 


Yes, it was introduced in the U.S from Europe.

The Bumblebee is native, and is in severe decline also....


A large survey of bumblebees in the United States shows that several species have declined substantially over the past 2 to 3 decades, verifying the suspicions of scientists who have seen local populations disappear. "We've lost a lot of bees. There are whole regions where we can't find them any more," says entomologist Sydney Cameron of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. The new research also suggests that a parasite might be driving the die-off, as declining species have higher rates of infection than do stable species.

Bumblebees pollinate many plants and crops such as tomatoes, pumpkins, and blueberries. They're particularly effective because they "buzz-pollinate," vibrating their wings fast to release lots of pollen. And their large size means that they can fly in weather that keeps honeybees, which pollinate some of the same plants, in their hives.


news.sciencemag.org...
edit on 23-1-2013 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:08 AM
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reply to post by freebornman
 


our bees pollinate so the death of bees means death of crops the death of crops means the death of people pretty simple.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by burntheships
reply to post by Philippines
 


The bee population has declined by 50% this is reported by beekeepers in the U.S. and
the E.U. Are you in the Phillipines? If so this might be the reason you have a different
bee population, I for one would be glad to hear yours are alive and buzzing.


Yep, in a rural part in the Philippines, which is why I said:




Bees here are still fine. Both native and domesticated ones. Sounds like a regional problem to me!


=D

In my opinion this will translate into more expensive honey, that's about it, besides some local regional areas that depend solely on the honeybees to pollinate.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by Philippines

In my opinion this will translate into more expensive honey, that's about it, besides some local regional areas that depend solely on the honeybees to pollinate.


Well, the entire U.S is going to be one of those local areas...sadly.
We can import bees, as we have been doing ...but it is a problem that needs
to be addressed.

Perhaps The Phillipines do not have GMO crops?



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:54 AM
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Originally posted by burntheships

Originally posted by Philippines

In my opinion this will translate into more expensive honey, that's about it, besides some local regional areas that depend solely on the honeybees to pollinate.


Well, the entire U.S is going to be one of those local areas...sadly.
We can import bees, as we have been doing ...but it is a problem that needs
to be addressed.

Perhaps The Phillipines do not have GMO crops?


There are trans-GMO crops introduced in the last decade or so, mainly corn and some soy. It depends on your location because some places have been reusing seed since the Spanish were here a couple hundred years ago.

I will post this article again, and I'm sure there are others out there. There are MANY for pollinators than just the domesticated honeybee. There are many different kinds of bees and other insects that help pollinate. Even the wind can be a pollinator for some plants =)

edit on 23-1-2013 by Philippines because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 02:35 AM
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Originally posted by burntheships
reply to post by Danbones
 


I wonder if the wasps are "hardier" in that sense, they seem like
real nasty creatures...had them attack me once. They dont like
the nest disturbed, thats where that saying comes from...

"mad as a hornet"

Ouch.



most likely due to different food sources several types of wasps are omnivores, they can eat pretty much anything from bugs and meat to drinking nectar. forget them stinging you, the darned things BITE as well, i have watched them do this to a friend lol tearing a good sized piece of flesh and flying off. i have also seen them steal tuna from my sandwich.


Diet Generally, wasps are parasites or parasitoids as larvae, and feed on nectar only as adults. Many wasps are predatory, using other insects (often paralyzed) as food for their larvae. In parasitic species, the first meals are almost always derived from the host in which the larvae grow. Several types of social wasps are omnivorous, feeding on a variety of fallen fruit, nectar, and carrion. Some of these social wasps, such as yellowjackets, may scavenge for dead insects to provide for their young. In many social species, the larvae provide sweet secretions that are consumed by adults. Adult male wasps sometimes visit flowers to obtain nectar to feed on in much the same manner as honey bees. Occasionally, some species, such as yellowjackets and, especially, hornets, invade honey bee nests and steal honey and/or brood.[citation needed]
en.wikipedia.org...

most wasps are also NOT normally pollinators so wasps surviving if bees die out is not a help. this also means if the problem has something to do with the pollen of GMO crap, it is far less likely to affect most wasps, but only certain varieties of wasps.


Pollination While the vast majority of wasps play no role in pollination, a few species can effectively transport pollen and therefore contribute for the pollination of several plant species, being potential or even efficient pollinators;[3] in a few cases such as figs pollinated by fig wasps, they are the only pollinators, and thus they are crucial to the survival of their host plants.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 02:55 AM
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Get out in your garden and plant what they like, it's gotta help. That's what we are doing this year in our nursery. Got alot of bees and other pollinators last year, areas of my land planted with what they like was a theatre of noise all day, bees, wasps, hoverflies, dragonflies ... usually sharing the same flower at the same time. Seemed very happy with me milling around too as there was alot of food there for them so no interest in what I was doing.

Have a look at this info to understand and get started. It is very easy too. And cheap.
pollinators.biodiversityireland.ie...
pollinators.biodiversityireland.ie...
pollinators.biodiversityireland.ie...

Find us on facebook
www.facebook.com...



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 03:21 AM
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The masses are idiots. I bring up bees becoming extinct to my friends, family, and random people and they pretend like I've said nothing. I swear everyday I live it's like witness a sinking ship and I'm the only one who notices. Idgaf anymore.

My dad who is one of the gurus of conspiracy theories from the pre-internet 80's era says there's nothing we can do to turn things around. He said "it's like having a baby, the inevitable has to happen. People will not wake up"



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 03:22 AM
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reply to post by Mez353
 


Dude the bees are gone. The ones that are left are in captivity.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 04:08 AM
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I wish we'd become extinct. I hate us a a race.

All we do is kill each other, and everything around us.

We're worse than cancer.

I love bees :-(



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 04:27 AM
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Pear growers in China have to use a small paint brush and pollinate the pear flowers themselves(the growers), no bee's anyway near the pear orchards, yet other parts of China export bee honey, go figure!






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