Beekeepers Expect "Worst Year For Bees, We’re Facing The Extinction Of A Species.”

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posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:14 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Intrptr,

Hey I was reading a bit this morning and some scientists are saying that
some beekeepers use corn syrup in the hives? Do you know anything about
that?




posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:20 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 

I hadn't heard that. Do you have a source for that?

Be back...



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:34 AM
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www.buzzaboutbees.net...

www.wvu.edu...

Last night while I was searching for plans, I came across information on the Varroa mite, which also seems to be killing the bees. They invade the hive and actually infest the bee. The second link is info on the mite, and some alternative ways to treat your hives if you are having the problem.

The first link is for bee hive plans. I was still unable to locate the right Mother Earth News, it may have walked out the front door with someone. I did find this site though and it looks promising.

Good luck all!



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


After reading about the mite infestations, I believe that it is to coat the throat of the bee to prevent the mite crawling inside of the bee, I may be wrong though, I missed a page or 2 of the thread.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


It seems to me the wasp are getting bigger!! like theyre cornbread fed!!



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Yes, I have just stumbled upon this!

This makes complete sense, if the beekeepers are using Corn Syrup in the hives,
no wonder the beehive suffer from CCD!


In a third study, to be published soon in the Bulletin of Insectology, seemingly healthy honey colonies were fed high-fructose corn syrup that had been treated with imidacloprid. Within six months, fifteen out of the sixteen hives that had been given the treated syrup were dead. In commercial beekeeping operations, bees are routinely fed corn syrup, and corn is routinely treated with neonicotinoids.

“I believe one reason that commercial beekeepers are experiencing the most severe Colony Collapse Disorder is because of the link between high-fructose corn syrup and neonicotinoids,” said the lead author of the study, Chensheng Lu, a professor at Harvard. (Bayer CropScience, one of the world’s largest producers of neonicotinoids, has disputed Lu’s paper, as well as the other two.)


Read more: www.newyorker.com...


The link to the study in that article is no longer working, I will try and find a study.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by woodsmom
 


Yes, I think your right, but inadvertantly, this corn sryup is made with corn that has the
built in pesticides! If this is the case, its no wonder the bees are 50% gone...

I did not know this, and can hardly believe what I am reading.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:57 AM
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reply to post by newfc12
 


Awesome documentary! Thanks for posting that


I feel that I'm affected by all the electromagnetic waves in the air. I've been to the doctors for chronic head pain that got worse when i moved to an apartment in an urban area. About 20 Wi-Fi routers in my building. I moved away and feel so much better. And, I went to see a neurologist (actually several, almost went to a Head Pain Institute for cognitive testing), and he found that my B-1 or thiamine was extremely low. And, B-12. Once a month B-12 injection and 100 mg B-1 per day and I'm fine. I didn't know that your brain gets it's energy only from thiamine or sugar to produce glucose. So, the idea that low glucose due to EM waves and your brain not producing sufficient melatonin is astounding.

I know it's off of the bee topic, but I need to find my way around too. Has anyone else been affected? I'm not about to make my bedroom a Faraday cage, but I have really tried to stay away from towers and cell phones.

Great Vid. I can't imagine how the bees are affected if it's proven that people are.
edit on 23-1-2013 by ibiubu because: (no reason given)
edit on 23-1-2013 by ibiubu because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:59 AM
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More on the corn syrup angle...


Every spring millions of bee colonies are trucked to the Central Valley of California and other agricultural areas to replace the wild pollinators, which have all but disappeared in many parts of the country. These bees are routinely fed high-fructose corn syrup instead of their own nutritious honey. And in an effort to boost productivity, the queens are now artificially inseminated, which has led to a disturbing decline in bee genetic diversity. Bees are also dusted with chemical poisons to control mites and other pathogens that have flourished in the overcrowded commercial colonies.

In 1923, Rudolph Steiner, the German founder of biodynamic agriculture, a precursor of the modern organic movement, predicted that within a hundred years artificial industrial techniques used to breed honey bees would lead to the species’ collapse. His prophecy was right on target!
blogs.reuters.com...





It sounds like something out of a science fiction movie — for the past 5 or so years, honeybee populations across the globe have been dying out, and scientists don’t really know why. That is, researchers hope, until now.

A pair of recent studies have pointed to pesticides as the main culprit for Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the term scientists use for sudden declines in bee populations. So where are these pesticides coming from? Right inside the hive itself.

Beekeepers use high-fructose corn syrup to supplement hives decanted of honey; since a great deal of American-grown corn is sprayed with neonicotinoids, a class of insecticides, traceable amounts can often be found in the corn syrup.


www.care2.com...




edit on 23-1-2013 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:06 AM
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So..let me understand this

These sprays, poisons, and gm crops have been going on for about what...20+ years?

And this year..(well, there have been losses before of course) but this year is special...because what? suddenly the bee's had enough and are gonna suicide on something that has been adapted into for many many generations of bee's now?

I don't buy it.

I accept the bee's are dying..I simply don't buy the cause of it. I think there is something else going on that either is being overlooked, or surpressed.

I want some proper science done on this. I have heard everything from pesticides, a virus, sterilization issues, ultraviolet light increasing and essentially blinding the bee's, etc.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


SFX,

After all of my reading, the studys, and the papers, the beekeepers experiences...
it pretty much boils down to a certain class of pesticides...

Neonicotinoids....that is in the GMO corn, its in there in a transgenic form,
and then on top of that the beekeepers have been using corn syrup
in the hives...that is from this transgenic corn.

Sure, all of the other things like cell phones and such are not good for any of us,
but its pretty much nailed to the fence that its the "neonics":



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:14 AM
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HF Corn Syrup link is that it has traceable amounts of insecticide...


Beekeepers use high-fructose corn syrup to supplement hives decanted of honey; since a great deal of American-grown corn is sprayed with neonicotinoids, a class of insecticides, traceable amounts can often be found in the corn syrup.
Source


Also see...

The authors, led by Chensheng (Alex) Lu, associate professor of environmental exposure biology in the Department of Environmental Health, write that the new research provides “convincing evidence” of the link between imidacloprid and the phenomenon known as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), in which adult bees abandon their hives.


cont...


Lu and his co-authors hypothesized that the uptick in CCD resulted from the presence of imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid introduced in the early 1990s. Bees can be exposed in two ways: through nectar from plants or through high-fructose corn syrup beekeepers use to feed their bees. (Since most U.S.-grown corn has been treated with imidacloprid since 2005, it’s also found in corn syrup.)

more at Source



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:19 AM
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those of us who are fortunate enough to have the space should plant gardens, as well as flowers that bees will be attracted to. In addition, build a couple of hives. You'll be blessed with fresh veggies, a bueatiful yard, and "home made" honey. Thee down side of this is that you will have to spend some time studying, learning how to build hives, and the best plants for your garden and your yard.
Guess what? It sounds like a lot of work, but once you get started, you might be surprised how much fun it can be.

Peace,
Kettlebellysmith



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:23 AM
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I noticed the bees around my house were getting more scarce, so changed some of the plants. We planted more flowering species, more things for them to feed from. We've put out feeders with sugar water and anything else we can think of to support the hives. I have fruit trees and garden plants that need pollination so it's a help to both of us if they thrive. I can't imagine a world without bees. So little, but so important to our survival. People give me funny looks when they get a bee on them and I yell "Don't kill it!". I do the same with spiders in the house during summer. I take them out and put them on my Bonsai to eat pests.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


Can electromagnetic radiation, that for mobile nets, and similar, be harmfull for human and animal health? Even for plants?
That is, maybe, sometimes, unneccessarily strong?
Just ask




posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by burntheships
reply to post by SaturnFX
 


SFX,

After all of my reading, the studys, and the papers, the beekeepers experiences...
it pretty much boils down to a certain class of pesticides...

Neonicotinoids....that is in the GMO corn, its in there in a transgenic form,
and then on top of that the beekeepers have been using corn syrup
in the hives...that is from this transgenic corn.

Sure, all of the other things like cell phones and such are not good for any of us,
but its pretty much nailed to the fence that its the "neonics":


If this is truth, then its a easy and quick fix, and should also be able to be tested and results produced immediately then, no?
remove the tainted crops, study colony under same conditions but with clean food supply...Even if its only testbedding 10 hives for confirmation.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


By the way Great OP and Thread. Thanks. And, thanks to all the contributors...a good thread.

From what I've researched, I think you are probably right. I remember when they linked atrazine to frog mutations and deaths. I guess pesticides do their job, as they are designed to kill.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by DAVID64
 


Those are good measures, the sugar water is fine,

just dont use corn syrup....it has the neonic

Pesticides and High Fructose Corn Syrup Recreate "Classic" Colony Collapse Disorder in Experiments



Harvard researchers have literally recreated classic cases of Colony Collapse Disorder by treating bees with minute doses of Bayer's imidacloprid:


Past research has shown that neonicotinoid pesticides, which target insects' central nervous system, do not instantly kill bees. However, to test the effect of even small amounts of these pesticides on western honeybees (Apis mellifera), Harvard researchers treated 16 hives with different levels of imidacloprid, leaving four hives untreated. After 12 weeks, the bees in all twenty hives—treated and untreated—were alive, though those treated with the highest does of imidacloprid appeared weaker. But by 23 weeks everything had changed: 15 out of the 16 hives (94 percent) treated with imidacloprid underwent classic Colony Collapse Disorder: hives were largely empty with only a few young bees surviving. The adults had simply vanished. The hives that received the highest doses of imidacloprid collapsed first. Meanwhile the five untreated hives were healthy.

While authors of previous studies have been cautious about drawing too many conclusions, suggesting that insecticides may be a contributing factor alongside habitat loss, climate change etc—lead author Chensheng (Alex) Lu was more unequivocal, stating that there is clear evidence that imidacloprid and other neonicotinoids are the likely "culprit for Colony Collapse Disorder".

Interestingly, the study also suggests that one of the ways bees are being exposed to imidacloprid may be through high fructose corn syrup which beekeepers have been feeding their colonies for years. U.S. corn began to be sprayed with imidacloprid in 2004-2005, just around the same time that CCD appeared on the scene.

www.treehugger.com...



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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I have known about the reduction in bees for a while and I have a bit of a strange suggestion for those who keep bees that I think will help.

Make your beehive in the shape of a pyramid or at the very least put a pyramid made from thin copper sheet on the top of the beehive. I believe it will increase both the quality and quantity of your honey. The geometry should be the same as the Giza pyramid ie the Pythagorean triangle (3,4,5) as the cross section....just some info on the off chance that a beekeeper should read this.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Well, yes it should be an easy fix, but the problem is that the corporate giants such as
Monsatan and Bayer are not going to stop producing the Pesticide Corn....

All of the GMO corn has this stuff built right into it....the bees forage and they pick
up these "neonics" and the pollen from these transgenic crops.....

Monsatans answer is to create GE bees that can withstand these toxins...






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