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Where is the outrage? Truth about 'fake' foods; Russia bans U.S. meat

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posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:24 PM
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This article written by a Dr. Mercola spells out some truths about fast food and many of our store-bought meats and all the chemicals used in the foods we consume. It's outrageous that we're still lining up to consume McRibs and burgers at McDonald's when their mostly made up of chemical man-made ingredients rather than actual real meat.


“More than 70 ingredients make up the McRib and, yes, one of them is pork. But as CBS 2’s Vince Gerasole reports, there’s also an ingredient that can be found in shoes... [Registered dietician Cassie] Vanderwall gave the McRib a closer look and found the McRib has azodicarbonamide, which is used to bleach the flour in bread. It has other uses. 'It could be on your yoga mat, in your gym shoes, in your anything that’s rubbery,' Vanderwall said... Then there’s the pork – which is really restructured meat product. In other words, it’s made from all the less expensive innards and castoffs from the pig... Vanderwall said the McRib ingredient list 'reminds me of a chemistry lab.'”


The article also says that a McDonald's burger is so full of chemicals that it fails to show signs of decomposition even after a decade. Damn.


When you consider the fact that a large number of the ingredients in a fast food meal exist nowhere in nature, but are rather concocted in a lab, the answer would have to be 'no.' Unfortunately, and to our severe detriment, ever since the advent of the so-called TV dinner back in the 1950's, the concept of "food" has expanded from meat, vegetables, raw dairy products, fruit and other such natural items to include the highly processed, preserved, artificially flavored and often brightly colored chemical concoctions. But man simply was NOT designed to thrive on man-made chemicals.


We can easily choose to avoid McDonald's burgers so even worse than this is that our store-bought beef contains a drug that has been banned in 160 countries, Russia included, called Ractopamine. Countries that still allow this product in their beef are the U.S., Canada and Australia. Mexico and Brazil recently said they will get rid of it to comply with Russian demands. Here's what the article says about Ractopamine:


a beta agonist drug that increases protein synthesis, thereby making the animal more muscular. This reduces the fat content of the meat. While the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) considers ractopamine safe and doesn’t test for it, Russia’s chief health inspector, Gennady Onishchenko, claims there are “serious questions” about the safety of the drug. He told the New York Times: “For instance, use of ractopamine is accompanied by a reduction in body mass, suppression of reproductive function, increase of mastitis in dairy herds, which leads to a steep decline in the quality and safety of milk.” Ractopamine is also known to affect the human cardiovascular system, and may cause food poisoning, according to Pravda.7 It’s also thought to be responsible for hyperactivity, muscle breakdown, and increased death and disability in livestock. While other drugs require a clearance period of around two weeks to help ensure the compounds are flushed from the meat prior to slaughter (and therefore reduce residues leftover for human consumption), there is no clearance period for ractopamine. In fact, livestock growers intentionally use the drug in the last days before slaughter in order to increase its effectiveness.


The article has a lot more information about the drug and also about Russia's ban on our meat. It says Russia imported $500 million annually in U.S. beef, so why is there not more news about this? China also bans this drug. Could the reason that MSM isn't covering this be because they don't want to hurt the beef industry anymore. In the article it also says that the store-bought beef is being fluffed up with 'pink slime' in order to increase the weight...our beef has 15% 'pink slime' so that they can shave off 3 cents per pound!!!

Pink Slime:


Sadly, store-bought foods you might not recognize as processed, such as ground beef, are oftentimes no better. As reported last year, approximately 70 percent of the ground beef sold in U.S. supermarkets contains "pink slime" added in as a cheap filler. The Pepto-Bismol-colored concoction consists of beef scraps and cow connective tissues, which has been treated with ammonium hydroxide (basically a solution of ammonia in water). It can legally make up 15 percent of any given beef product, which shaves about three cents off the cost for a pound of ground beef. The trimmings used come from parts of the cow that are most likely to be contaminated with dangerous bacteria like E. coli — which is why it must be treated with ammonia to kill off the pathogens in the first place. It’s really industrial food practices like this that pose very real threats to your health, not raw unpasteurized dairy products and other non-processed whole foods...


Here's the Article:

The Unsavory Truth about the McRib and Russia bans U.S. beef

Here's a couple more sources:

Russia knows more about U.S. beef than U.S.

Russia bans U.S. meat over drug Ractopamine

I just had one of those McRibs the other day. After reading this article I think I'll be going organic. This drug is not only in beef, but also turkey and pigs. What do you think ATS? When is this going to stop and we get back to some good ol' fashioned foods like Grandma used to make? Just about everything in a supermarket these days is processed in one way or another. The only thing left is Whole Foods, but most Americans can't afford it, so they have to line up like sheep and take it!
edit on 16-1-2013 by Rezlooper because: (no reason given)
edit on 16-1-2013 by Rezlooper because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:33 PM
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It's a good thing I don't eat MC Ribs...You had me at the shoe...

I don't like MC Donald's anyway.
But, I'm still going to eat my beef and turkey.
edit on 16-1-2013 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


That's what I'm saying...beef and turkey without Ractopamine and pink slime



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:47 PM
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It doesn't matter how many articles and research hits the public between the eyes. The fact remains that so many people just don't care. If it tastes good, go for it.

The families that actually live off of McCrappy's have no choice as it's cheaper than buying fresh in many cases. Not all but many.

And then we have those that say "I don't believe this great company would do these things so stop making up lies" It helps them get through the day as they shove more slime down their kid's gullets.

I gave up McD's 25 yrs ago and decided to have a burger a year ago because I needed a quick meal. Results? Vomiting within 30 minutes.

Peace



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:48 PM
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What about the UK?




30% horse meat is for dinner.


www.mirror.co.uk...


Revealed: Dirty Larry, the multi-millionaire behind firm sneaking horsemeat into your supermarket
www.dailymail.co.uk...

Oh this company sell meat to Burger King also.
edit on 16-1-2013 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by JBA2848
 


Well was it natural horse meat? I guess the real concern is the chemicals and garbage that's in food not the species of meat.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:53 PM
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Love my Big Mac once in a while, but I have to admit I eat a lot less fast food than I used to, just because of the things I have leaned about it. Absolutely none of it is real food!

I buy my meat from the local locker plant (beef processor). No added preservatives (chemicals) like the grocery stores. And it costs less too.

I buy organic chicken at the grocery store, just because I cannot find locally grown for quite some time now, But, even though the packages say no antibiotics etc. I am still skeptical.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by topherman420
 


You have no idea what is in anything anymore. By from the grocery store you will get the same crap.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I gave up McD's 25 yrs ago and decided to have a burger a year ago because I needed a quick meal. Results? Vomiting within 30 minutes.


Holy Drama Queen...and Super Size Me already covered that.


But still Jude, you did your part, as this is a great example of those that will compromise their positions for instant gratification...in other words - a perfect example of the fast food nation.





Thanks OP for bringing this to light.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 09:57 PM
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Who eats that stuff anyways?
I have to go with Russia on this one.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:08 PM
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If anyone can develop a multi billion dollar industry on a hamburger that apparently nobody will admit to eating, I will invest.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by Superhans
If anyone can develop a multi billion dollar industry on a hamburger that apparently nobody will admit to eating, I will invest.





posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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Do you all know about meat glue?

Check this out:




posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:17 PM
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Only a few will be outraged by this because only a few people can afford to eat organic. Damned if we do something about it and many people can't afford to eat meat, and damned if we don't and most of us end up with health risks.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:18 PM
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Hrmm... I no longer have this fast food. It literally makes me feel sick in the stomach. I have friends that can down two big macs, two quarter pounders, fries, the ‘coke’ and a sundae in one sitting... I feel physically ill after one cheeseburger and guilty if I stupidly have two. It’s actually pretty expensive considering what you get. On occasion I’ll get Grill’d or Schintz (they’re two ‘boutique’ burger chains in Australia) as they seem to be real food and fresh and best of all I don’t feel sick afterward. I don’t even think Maccers tastes good, except the chips.

All these chemicals aren’t surprising. I’m pretty sure they increase the weight of mince meat with water, too. The colouring they use some sort of food dye to give it a real pinkish-red appearance. The duller burgundy type colour is said to be ‘fresher’ and ‘healthier’, haha. Seems to be all of these dangerous chemicals that are banned throughout the world are legal in the US and Australia, why is this?

When I buy a house I’ll be building a veggie patch in the backyard for sure.



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:19 PM
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The article has some helpful tips to avoiding the supermarket foods with the pesticides, preservatives, additives, hormones, drugs, and other concoctions by visiting your local farmers and whole foods.


And it’s not nearly as daunting a task as it may seem to find a local farmer that can supply your family with healthy, humanely raised animal products and produce. At LocalHarvest.org, for instance, you can enter your zip code and find farmers' markets, family farms, and other sources of sustainably grown food in your area, all with the click of a button. Once you make the switch from supermarket to local farmer, the choice will seem natural, and you can have peace of mind that the food you’re feeding your family is naturally wholesome. That said, regardless of where you do your grocery shopping, these are the signs of high-quality, health-promoting foods you want to look for:

It's grown without pesticides and chemical fertilizers (organic foods fit this description, but so do some non-organic foods)

It's not genetically modified

It contains no added growth hormones, antibiotics, or other drugs

It does not contain any artificial ingredients, including chemical preservatives

It is fresh (keep in mind that if you have to choose between wilted organic produce or fresh conventional produce, the latter may actually be the better option)

It did not come from a factory farm

It is grown with the laws of nature in mind (meaning animals are fed their native diets, not a mix of grains and animal byproducts, and have free-range access to the outdoors)

It is grown in a sustainable way (using minimal amounts of water, protecting the soil from burnout, and turning animal wastes into natural fertilizers instead of environmental pollutants)



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:20 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:22 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by Superhans
 


They built that billion-dollar industry on real meat! Then they lost their way.






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