NuSTAR has Detected a Huge Explosion in the Center of our Galaxy and inbound...

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posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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Something has exploded in the centre of our galaxy and inbound...
Are we entering or crossing the galactic plane? Hope not!

www.nasa.gov...

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy in high-energy X-ray light. The background image, taken in infrared light, shows the location of our Milky Way's humongous black hole, called Sagittarius A*, or Sgr A* for short. NuSTAR is the first telescope to be able to focus high-energy X-rays, giving astronomers a new tool for probing extreme objects such as black holes.

In the main image, the brightest white dot is the hottest material located closest to the black hole, and the surrounding pinkish blob is hot gas, likely belonging to a nearby supernova remnant. The time series at right shows a flare caught by NuSTAR over an observing period of two days in July; the middle panel shows the peak of the flare, when the black hole was consuming and heating matter to temperatures up to 180 million degrees Fahrenheit (100 million degrees Celsius).

[...] NuSTAR was lucky to have captured an outburst from the black hole during its observing campaign...


NASA: The most lucky Space Agency ever....

An "interesting" theory....




NASA witnessed an explosion at the centre of our galaxy which must have been travelling at the speed of light for thousands of yrs beccause of the distance from our solar system to where the centre of the galaxy is, and this is recently been observed and i have to say it is terrifying because the speed of light or light which travels at the speed of light, has arrived at an optical device orbiting planet earth, so what you might say, let me try and help you understand this, you will get an EMP pulse off the detonation from a nuclear device before you encounter the blast, it is very difficult for anything molecular or even on the scale of frequency to travel at the speeds of light, now think about that, there is something behind the light that was optically observed from NASA, such as x rays, gamma rays, alpha beta and cosmic particles following at a slightly slower speed than that of light. when this arrives is only a question of speed against distance and forecasting ahead, NASA know when the photos were taken and these observations recorded, they know what speeds particles travel at from such exotic explosions, they know the time to the minute, and i am just going to leave it here because i do not know those specifics, i only know that light will be the first sign of things to come with relation to the speed of light.

edit on 19-12-2012 by Arken because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:54 AM
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Wow. I hope this is what we've been waiting for.
Activate the serpent gate!!!



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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Pretty interesting... What effects could this have on earth? I'm no astronomer.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Wouldn't it take a long long time to reach us?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:02 PM
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Originally posted by slapjacks
Pretty interesting... What effects could this have on earth? I'm no astronomer.


It depend if you stay on the walk side or right in the middle of the railway when the train arrive....



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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That picture was at least posted to wiki for Nustar in October.. So pretty pointless..



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 




Wouldn't it take a long long time to reach us?



I think it's like 26000 years, so nothing to worry about really, because I reckon it will take about 13.5 million years for any charged particles to reach us.
edit on 19-12-2012 by DAZ21 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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According to the NASA article, this happened back in July. So I am thinking this is nothing to get really worked up about.

But, it is pretty cool. I remember hearing that they will be collecting more data on our galaxy's black hole over the course of the next year or so.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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I was watching discovery or natgeo and they were talking about a gamma ray burst...
I'm curious if that "flare" generated one, if so how long ago and how long till it would hit, and would we have any way if knowing it before it does...

It is curious to day the least..

Grim



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee
reply to post by Arken
 


Wouldn't it take a long long time to reach us?


I'm no an astronomer, but if we se now (today) this huge flare in the middle of the galaxy, this means that the explosion is old of several billion years and maybe ir right the angle...

maybe I'm wrong.


+5 more 
posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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Originally posted by Arken

Originally posted by Char-Lee
reply to post by Arken
 


Wouldn't it take a long long time to reach us?


I'm no an astronomer, but if we se now (today) this huge flare in the middle of the galaxy, this means that the explosion is old of several billion years and maybe ir right the angle...

maybe I'm wrong.


If we are 26.000 (roughly) light years away from the middle of the galaxy, and we see a flash from there, then that flash happened 26.000 years ago, not billions.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Nothing will arrive here from that black hole, apart from those x-rays which have already arrived in July. It's just too far to have any effect on us. The black hole has eaten something, and the x-rays are the "burp". I bet this sort of thing happened many times in the recent past, it's just that we weren't able to detect it before.

Official NuSTAR site, with news and pictures: www.nustar.caltech.edu...

P.S. NuSTAR is smexy. It's part of the NASA Small Explorer satellite program (SMEX).
edit on 19-12-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by Bronagh
 


exactly thx.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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How interesting that I came across your post after I had read this...this morning....



For some unknown reason, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy shoots out an X-ray flare about once a day. These flares last a few hours with the brightness ranging from a few times to nearly one hundred times that of the black hole’s regular output. But back in February 2012, astronomers using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory detected the brightest flare ever observed from the central black hole, also known as Sagittarius A*. The flare, recorded 26,000 light years away, was 150 times brighter than the black hole’s normal luminosity.

What causes these outbursts? Scientists aren’t sure. But Sagittarius A* doesn’t seem to be slowing down, even though as black holes age they should show a decrease in activity.



Source



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:13 PM
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It will be here on Friday.

Just two more days.........




posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:14 PM
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The timing of this thread could not be more epic.

Truthfully, how many people thought "killshot" when they saw the thread tittle...? SMH I need to take an ATS fast..



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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Originally posted by Arken

Originally posted by Char-Lee
reply to post by Arken
 


Wouldn't it take a long long time to reach us?


I'm no an astronomer, but if we se now (today) this huge flare in the middle of the galaxy, this means that the explosion is old of several billion years and maybe ir right the angle...

maybe I'm wrong.


not that old at all since we are 25,000 light years from the light source, being SagB so this happened roughly 25k years ago. the better question would be how long will it take for the force of the explosion to reach us.

here is an article related to your thread.


Each century, about two massive stars in our own galaxy explode, producing magnificent supernovae. In the Universe at large, a supernova event occurs every second. Astrophysicists at the level of Stephen Hawking believe that these massive explosions may be resonsible for killing off advanced civilization --a major factor perhaps in the "Great Silence" of the Fermi Paradox.
These stellar explosions send fundamental, uncharged particles called neutrinos streaming our way and generate ripples called gravitational waves in the fabric of space-time. Scientists are waiting for the neutrinos and gravitational waves from about 1000 supernovae that have already exploded at distant locations in the Milky Way to reach us. On Earth, large, sensitive neutrino and gravitational-wave detectors have the ability to detect these respective signals, which will provide information about what happens in the core of collapsing massive stars just before they explode.

www.dailygalaxy.com...


highlights mine, interesting theory Stephen put out there and i think very pertinent to our discussion.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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The thing you need to know are:-
What are the speeds of Gamma and X-rays.

Like with any explosion you see the light first, then the sound, then shockwave.

So we have seen the light, what arrives next?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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X-rays, gamma rays and visible light are all types of electromagnetic radiation Arken... They all travel at the same speed in a vacum.
edit on 19-12-2012 by Atzil321 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by MasterPainter
 


Good point will be interesting... If my microwave popcorn starts popping without being in the microwave I guess we will have answer...


Tho in all seriousness it is a good question...

Grim





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