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NuSTAR has Detected a Huge Explosion in the Center of our Galaxy and inbound...

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posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by Arken
Something has exploded in the centre of our galaxy and inbound...
Are we entering or crossing the galactic plane? Hope not!


Not for 27 million years.

Close shave, eh?




posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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Agree with both, 1) non existence of blast wave, 2) spreading of particles on a sphere surface with a radius 26,000 lightyears. In few words, no effects in earth. Merry Christmas.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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an explosion kinda makes me think of the anime called "Stellvia" basically the earth was hit by a cosmic wave that wiped out alot of people, when the survivors came out they found space had been changed. but after building and recovering discovered that there was another wave coming that would wipe everything out.

i tried to find a cut scene of it but it was too hard.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by Red73Eng
Agree with both, 1) non existence of blast wave, 2) spreading of particles on a sphere surface with a radius 26,000 lightyears. In few words, no effects in earth. Merry Christmas.


Yeah, I'm thinking inverse square law here....



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Galactic Fart!



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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disclaimer: I don't know jack about astronomy and am basing this thought solely on what has been posted on this thread so far.

So, mental exercise;

If it would take roughly 26000 years for the energy of that explosion to reach earth, and that we are in fact nearing the threshold of a 26000 year cycle's completion, and that this cycle has been repeating since the conception of our universe, wouldn't it be correct in saying that perhaps we just witnessed the last explosion visually? (being as the light from it would have taken 26000 years to get here)

That is to say, are we getting a playback from the completion of the last cycle?

To field one question preemptively:

The radiation from said explosion would probably propagate slightly slower through the vacuum of space than would the actual light. Not much, but maybe say...about a day and some change out of a 26000 year span?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by Theeastcoastwest
 


Didn't see it as light THIS time either, unless they had an advanced x-ray telescope in orbit 26000 years ago, they wouldn't have seen it. And it's hit. And gone. And nothing happened.

EM radiation all got here at the same time. Particulate radiation would be much slower, but also spread on the surface of a sphere 26000 l.y. in radius. That's a LOT. Imagine blowing up a balloon in your hand until it was the size of the earth - not much rubber in any one spot.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 08:31 PM
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IF it was a gamma-ray burst those jets (of particles) can travel at more than 99.995 percent the speed of light. So it would be 26.000 - 25.998,7 = something between a year to several months.
However even if it was a gama ray burst it is pretty far from us. And it wasn't even gamma right?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by Theeastcoastwest
 


Actually the sun's distance from the galactic center of the Milky way is 27.1 kly (or 27,100 light years) with and error of + or - 1.1 kly.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 08:52 PM
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how many earth years in a light year?

I know light year is distance and earth years are time. Must be able to work it out though.
Anyone good at math?
edit on 19-12-2012 by ZeussusZ because: (no reason given)

from some dude on yahoo-
A light year is distance......not a time..BUT..

366.22 days x circumference of the earth. Then divide one light year by the resulting number (14,676,632.72km)
so

366.22 days x 40,076km = 14,676,632.72km
9,460,730,472,580.8km/14,676,632.72km = 644,611.78

So, 644,611.78 years.


answers.yahoo.com...
edit on 19-12-2012 by ZeussusZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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365.24 days in a year.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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Could it be that the majority of light that we see that makes up the galactic bulge (above and below) is actually extremely bent/curved incidental light from the stars on the other side of the galaxy? Bent by the SMBH in the middle? Every so often more of that incidental light collimates right at us, by random chance. Perhaps those chances increase as we near the galactic plane due to more gravitational lensing by linearly aligned masses (stars)?

Just a thought...
edit on 19-12-2012 by Flux8 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by ZeussusZ
 


Haha, It had to be a kid. What a math!



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by PapagiorgioCZ
 


Gamma got here at exactly the same time as xray and visible light, because they're all EM. The only way it might not is if the beam had to travel through something dispersive and dense enough to make a difference, which is unlikely.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by ZeussusZ
how many earth years in a light year?

I know light year is distance and earth years are time. Must be able to work it out though.
Anyone good at math?
edit on 19-12-2012 by ZeussusZ because: (no reason given)

from some dude on yahoo-
A light year is distance......not a time..BUT..

366.22 days x circumference of the earth. Then divide one light year by the resulting number (14,676,632.72km)
so

366.22 days x 40,076km = 14,676,632.72km
9,460,730,472,580.8km/14,676,632.72km = 644,611.78

So, 644,611.78 years.


answers.yahoo.com...
edit on 19-12-2012 by ZeussusZ because: (no reason given)


A Light Year is a measurement of distance used in astronomy.

It's the distance that it takes light to travel in 1 year.

The speed of light is 299,792 km or 186,000 miles in one second. So if you multiply that by 3,600 your get how fast it is in per hour. Multiply that by 24 and you have per day and of course multiply that by 365 and you get a year. That's not exact mesurements but you get the idea.

Specifically 1 light year is the same as 5.8 trillion miles.

One could look at it like time too. The star Alpha Centauri is 4.3 light years away (multiply that to 5.8 trillion and you'll get how many miles away that is). It takes like 4.3 years to get from there to here.

Also, a year on Earth is not 366.22 days, but is 365.256363004 days
edit on 19-12-2012 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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Originally posted by ZeussusZ
how many earth years in a light year?

I know light year is distance and earth years are time. Must be able to work it out though.


Well, no, because one's distance and one's time. It's like saying I can convert weight to speed if I throw enough numbers together, just doesn't work that way.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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A tiny flash of light, most likely anything else coming our way would be tiny.

But one giant explosion might set off others.

How long would such a chain reaction take place? If there are light years
Between stars effected, there might be years involved in such a chain reaction.

edit on 19-12-2012 by poet1b because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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Originally posted by Bronagh

Originally posted by Arken

Originally posted by Char-Lee
reply to post by Arken
 


Wouldn't it take a long long time to reach us?


I'm no an astronomer, but if we se now (today) this huge flare in the middle of the galaxy, this means that the explosion is old of several billion years and maybe ir right the angle...

maybe I'm wrong.


If we are 26.000 (roughly) light years away from the middle of the galaxy, and we see a flash from there, then that flash happened 26.000 years ago, not billions.


And what if it flashes every 26,000 years?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:02 PM
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It seems to me that the energy would travel just a bit differently in speeds and the most obvious example I can think of without trying is the 1859 Carrington Event. The people of the time saw the flash of the flare visually as the sun getting a bit brighter for a brief period and then later.. Well, it sets the bar for bad, I'd say. Hopefully we don't see cosmic effects that do something similar or worse.


August 28 - September 2, 1859 - The Storm of 1859 was the first event recorded by humans from a truly global perspective, not to be repeated until the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883 turned the sunsets red and crimson the world-over. Newspapers such as the New York Times were active in running extensive stories about the 1859 solar storm, and collecting reports from other countries. The great geomagnetic storm of 1859 is really composed of two closely spaced massive worldwide auroral events. The first event began on August 28th and the second began on September 2nd. It is the storm on September 2nd that results from the Carrington-Hodgson white light flare that occurred on the sun September 1st. (Drawing by Carrington of flaring sunspot)
Source

Wasn't there a set of northern lights and geo storm awhile back that was never properly explained for origin? I seem to recall something where the sun hadn't done anything to explain the aurora. I wonder?



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