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NuSTAR has Detected a Huge Explosion in the Center of our Galaxy and inbound...

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posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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There's plenty of time to finish your soup.
What's the point of a worry? some rocks out there could do more damage, with unforeseen affects, like slowing down the Earth and what that would entail, or a damaging solar flare, or a nuclear winter...blah blah.




posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


You may be right seeing as it was 26,000 years ago.

Coincidence or what?


+6 more 
posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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"Slumber, watcher, till the spheres,
Six and twenty thousand years
Have revolv'd, and I return
To the spot where now I burn.
Other stars anon shall rise
To the axis of the skies;
Stars that soothe and stars that bless
With a sweet forgetfulness:
Only when my round is o'er
Shall the past disturb thy door."

Yay Lovecraft. That's no flare, the old ones commeth!.

edit on 19-12-2012 by Suspiria because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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I love this quote:



Earlier this year, a group of researchers said that the outbursts may come from asteroids or even wandering planets that come too close to the black hole and they get consumed. Basically, the black hole is eating asteroids and then belching out X-ray gas.


They said belching...lol

This quote concerns me:



“Suddenly, for whatever reason, Sagittarius A* is eating a lot more,” said Michael Nowak, a research scientist at MIT Kavli and co-author of a new paper in the Astrophysical Journal. “One theory is that every so often, an asteroid gets close to the black hole, the black hole stretches and rips it to pieces, and eats the material and turns it into radiation, so you see these big flares.”


No one knows anything yet...




While such events like this big blast appear to be relatively rare, Nowak suspects that flare-ups may occur more frequently than scientists expect. The team has reserved more than a month of time on the Chandra Observatory to study Sagittarius A* in hopes of identifying more flares, and possibly what’s causing them.

The physics underlying such a phenomenon remain a puzzle that Baganoff and others hope to tease out with future observations.

“We’re really studying the great escape, because most of the gas escapes, and that’s not what we expect,” Baganoff says. “So we’re piecing out the history of the activity of the center of our galaxy.”




Source



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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Gamma rays, X rays, Visible light, Infrared, Ultraviolet all travel at what we coin the speed of light. Those are electromagnetic frequencies, with Gamma and X ray being the highest frequencies, and infrared the lowest frequency.

So, when the probe captured the images, ALL of those frequencies were arriving here with the light you see in the image.

No need to cower in terror while waiting for some Gama rays on it's way to fry you, as when the flare happened and the light got here, so did the rest of the EM spectrum.

In other words: the electromagnetic energy part of the event is over with.

Now, just like the sun, you see the flare before the excited or ionized particles get here, because those particles travel much, much, MUCH slower than the speed of light.

How much slower? That's a good question, and is dependent on many things, but let us take a look at an example:

CME errupts from the sun and we see it. It took about 8 minutes for the light of that CME to get here.
However, if you've ever kept an eye on these types of solar events, you know that it can take a day, or even 2 days for the ionized particles that give us those beautiful northern lights to get here. Many are traveling at only 2 million miles per hour.

Let's say this explosion created some very high velocity ionized particles, and give them a velocity of about 10 million miles per hour.

We are 26,000 light years away from there. That is 1,456,000,000,000,000,000 or 1.456 x 10^18 miles away. At 10,000,000 Mph, it will take those particles 16,621,000 years to get here.

That's IF they survive not being absorbed by things in between here an there, like other stars, interstellar dust, etc, etc,.....and only if it was pointed in the right way because, let's face it folks, the solar system is not going to be sitting here in 16 millions years, but will be quite a ways down the road on it's path around the galaxy.....



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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Our atmosphere is supposed to block most celestial radiation, right?

But what if the arrival of such radiation coincides with a massive pole shift?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by Suspiria
"Slumber, watcher, till the spheres,
Six and twenty thousand years
Have revolv'd, and I return
To the spot where now I burn.
Other stars anon shall rise
To the axis of the skies;
Stars that soothe and stars that bless
With a sweet forgetfulness:
Only when my round is o'er
Shall the past disturb thy door."

Yay Lovecraft. That's no flare, the old ones commeth!.
edit on 19-12-2012 by Suspiria because: (no reason given)



Excellent!
Applause for me.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by Atzil321
X-rays, gamma rays and visible light are all types of electromagnetic radiation Arken... They all travel at the same speed in a vacum.
edit on 19-12-2012 by Atzil321 because: (no reason given)


How do these effect our sun?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Well, perhaps a good source of information would be the rays of the sun. I believe those take 7 minutes to get here. My guess is that maybe the rays from the explosion would be about 1/250thof the speed of light. Probably be another 70,000 years or so before we'd feel it. If there was anything to "feel" by then.

Shockwaves that is....Not x rays or gamma
edit on 12/19/1212 by foodstamp because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:32 PM
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Thanks OP, I have my new desktop background!



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by unphased
The timing of this thread could not be more epic.

Truthfully, how many people thought "killshot" when they saw the thread tittle...? SMH I need to take an ATS fast..


Sorry, this is off topic... Déjà vu.

I swear i've seen that exact post....why oh why was it on this thread... now i'm getting paranoid!

edit on 19/12/2012 by SilentE because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee

Originally posted by Atzil321
X-rays, gamma rays and visible light are all types of electromagnetic radiation Arken... They all travel at the same speed in a vacum.
edit on 19-12-2012 by Atzil321 because: (no reason given)


How do these effect our sun?


They don't.

Or rather they have about as much affect on our sun as your shining a flash light on a roaring fire in a fireplace.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Arken...don't take this the wrong way, i'm a fan...normally.

But c'mon, were just getting used to 2012 being a load of BS, and you're starting already with 2013!

This doesn't bode well for post quality in 2013 mate!

OK...the light from an explosion thousands of light years away has reached us, and the doom predictions are that the heavier, denser particles travelling at sub-light speeds will be knocking on Earths door to kick our teeth in soon.

This is the centre of our Galaxy...hasn't anyone thought that there are objects inbetween our little Solar system and whatever might be following? How about millions of stars and other planetary systems?

In any case, even if the big bad particles are heading right for Earth and won't be obstructed millions of times on it's way here, even at just a fraction below TSOL, it might take an extra hundred years or more to reach us.

I wouldn't start doom and gloom posts about 2013 just yet mate, let's get 2012 out of the way first eh?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 



No need to cower in terror while waiting for some Gama rays on it's way to fry you


Oh p*sh. Spoilsport. I was getting all exited about being fried and was even considering going large. Not even just a teensy weensy bit of terror, pretty please?

Tell me however. I am getting more and more perplexed by what seems to be a bit of a conundrum. A black hole sooks everything in and is so strong even light cannot escape. Yet it belches? How so?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 




Yet it belches? How so?

The radiation does not come from the black hole. It comes from near, not within, the event horizon
Matter being destroyed near the event horizon produces a lot of energy.
news.nationalgeographic.com...
edit on 12/19/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by PuterMan
reply to post by eriktheawful
 



No need to cower in terror while waiting for some Gama rays on it's way to fry you


Oh p*sh. Spoilsport. I was getting all exited about being fried and was even considering going large. Not even just a teensy weensy bit of terror, pretty please?

Tell me however. I am getting more and more perplexed by what seems to be a bit of a conundrum. A black hole sooks everything in and is so strong even light cannot escape. Yet it belches? How so?


What Phage just said.

Things just outside the event horizon that we are seeing.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 




Tell me however. I am getting more and more perplexed by what seems to be a bit of a conundrum. A black hole sooks everything in and is so strong even light cannot escape. Yet it belches? How so?


Good question.

Gas is certainly heavier than a photon...so how is it light cannot escape the star crushing super-gravity of a massive black hole...but gas can?

Doesn't make much sense to me either mate.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 

Which would also indicate that no material wavefront would be expanding from the event.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by PuterMan
reply to post by eriktheawful
 



No need to cower in terror while waiting for some Gama rays on it's way to fry you


Oh p*sh. Spoilsport. I was getting all exited about being fried and was even considering going large. Not even just a teensy weensy bit of terror, pretty please?

Tell me however. I am getting more and more perplexed by what seems to be a bit of a conundrum. A black hole sooks everything in and is so strong even light cannot escape. Yet it belches? How so?


What about Hawking radiation?



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by DAZ21
 


What about Hawking radiation?

Not confirmed to exist.





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