Does this microwave satellite imagery prove that Sandy was boosted by HAARP??

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posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by Vitruvian

BTW - Take note of the "Perfect Designer (Sandy) Storm"




OHMYGOD THE SEASHELLS ARE ATTACKING US!

Or maybe it is just that nature is sometimes both beautiful and terrifying at the same time?




posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:19 PM
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Other observations:

It doesn't really make sense for oh so many reasons that this is a HAARP microwave death beam. Let's pick out a few.

1) That "microwave energy death swath" doesn't point anywhere near Gakona.

2) They already tell you you can see dark red persistent swath glitches on the FAQ. There's you one.

3) If you were lying about that to hide the "fact" that it's a Gakona death beam, why not simply interpolate it away and replace the indicting data with happy data? It's not like they're not manipulating this all to hell and gone.
How hard could it be to put in a "scalar HAARP microwave death weapon signature" filter? There's a metric ton of filtering in any radar image anyway.

4) On the image's color scale, red is "very dark". That is, if you look at their scale, red corresponds to "a lot of rainfall". Since rainfall absorbs the sea-shine below, that means that the red colored areas are not indicating that the swath has MORE microwave flux, it has LESS. Nearly zero, in fact. So if this is indicating a HAARP microwave energy death beam, it's somehow an ANTI-microwave death beam, that is reducing microwaves coming straight up from the ocean surface. WOW! It's beaming COLD microwaves from Gakona!

5) The swath has very abrupt boundaries. In practice, beaming microwaves through rain will blur them out.

6) The swath curves. Now, frankly, if you're going all 'flying monkey' here I guess a cold scalar anti-microwave Gakona death beam could curve too, since it's in the fiction area. However, I'd have to say that the DMSP radiometry imager isn't designed to receive cold microwaves, so it's probably not going to show it anyway.

7) HAARP doesn't emit microwaves. It can't. Just can't. Any more than your local AM radio station antenna. The facility radar does, but not the IRI.

8) Even if you assume that's a lie, you've got some simple physics to deal with - the MUF. Alas, the 85GHz frequency that the DMSP satellite is imaging with easily penetrates the ionosphere - it HAS to, because you can see the groundshine with the imager. Depending on the time of day and space conditions, pretty much anything over 50MHz will go right through the ionosphere and keep going.

What this means for you is, anything over 50MHz is line of sight, except in certain really odd circumstances, where you might get up to the 200MHz band. But 85GHz is two orders of magnitude over that. 85GHz is always and forever line of sight. And that's about 10 miles, sometimes less. Except your death swath is longer than that, and Gakona is thousands of miles away. No microwaves from HAARP for you, I fear.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
Could the red swipe be a heat signal generated by the storm itself? Isn't that the path it took?

Not an expert by any means but just asking.

Peace


That's what it looks like to me as well. One of the unique characteristic of this storm, is it's westward path this late in the year, and that looked like a warm front pushing the storm west.

I do see the "waves" in the images, however believe that they're just artificts in the image. The images are coming from something that's always moving (satellite?) and we're seeing a full progression of pictures from one day with the device, in a short amount of time. The waves remain static throughout the picture, even though the device is moving, which means that they're coming from the device itself, as they don't follow with the rotation of the earth.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by Evil_Santa
 


and that looked like a warm front pushing the storm west.

In the northern hemisphere fronts move from west to east (or from south to north).
There was no warm front pushing Sandy but there was a high pressure area.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thats why this storm is unique, it doesn't follow normal weather patterns.

www.npr.org... questions-about-climate-and-the-future

This article goes over some scenarios as to why this storm went from east-to-west this late in the year.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


I just want to say thanks for the time and effort put into presenting that information for us. Great work, I do appreciate it.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by Evil_Santa
 

I happened to hear that NPR broadcast yesterday.


Thats why this storm is unique, it doesn't follow normal weather patterns.
Rare perhaps, unusual, but not unique. Dean, in 1983 did the same left turn.


Because Sandy was a late season storm it was subjected to weather patterns that most storms don't encounter. It was pushed to the west by the "Greenland high".



edit on 11/1/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


YW, this stuff is thick and hard to chew, having done a lot of work in the field I thought I could liven things up a bit with an adult-level detailed explanation.

I often just drop a one or two line reply, but hey, you guys can't really be expected to know this stuff, so it's not fair. Also, this stuff's all declassed so I can't get in trouble by going all detaily.

Now, what's interesting is the NRO's method of getting detailed ground images from +++CARRIER LOST+++



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 



Now, what's interesting is the NRO's method of getting detailed ground images from +++CARRIER LOST+++

What can you add to that?



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
Could the red swipe be a heat signal generated by the storm itself? Isn't that the path it took?

Not an expert by any means but just asking.

Peace


No it's just a very common glitch in the data processing.

This comes up nearly every time there's a major hurricane hit the US - Ophelia and Irene being a couple of recent cases.

If you actually look at the MIMIC site, they explain exactly what it is


The individual images that are used as input into this product sometimes contain bad data in the form of missing scanlines or anamalously high or low values that often stretch in an arc across the image. When these areas are incorporated into the MIMIC product they form artifacts that fade in and out, and appear to move with the storm center. However, they have no physical meaning and hopefully they will not obstruct your interpretation of the imagery.


tropic.ssec.wisc.edu...

edit on 2-11-2012 by AndyMayhew because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:20 AM
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Originally posted by 1AnunnakiBastard

Originally posted by jude11
Could the red swipe be a heat signal generated by the storm itself? Isn't that the path it took?

Not an expert by any means but just asking.

Peace


IMO that's a heat signal that's either going in or out of the storm. But storms are not supposed to decrease the atmospheric temperature?? How many of those overheated red signals do you see in the other days of the imagery database??? I mean, it doesn't look natural to me, but I'm no expert... It's just my opinion!


So you have no idea what the images mean and decided to try interpret them and came up with a fear mongering story.

Just another day at ATS



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 04:48 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 






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