Canadian police urge Parliament to pass domestic spying bill

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posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 03:50 AM
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A thought occurred to me, when they finally get all the surveillance in the world(which they eventually will) wont people just go back to the old days of writing something on paper, giving it to the local kids and riding a bike across town to the next note drop off/package drop off. So after 15-35 years how ever long it takes them, 250 million to trillions of dollars spent making new laws to get "internet criminals" it will all be a complete waste because I can just go send a regular mail letter, have someone else deliver it, or make up my own code system and just hand it to people right in front of everyone and have no clue what it reads. That system worked for thousands of years from yakuza/triads/mafia/ ect ect. Now granted the further away the person is you need to get a package to makes for a longer trip, but one that is almost undetectable as well.

As far as the internet troll crap, the only way someone can troll you is if you put yourself out there, if you put yourself out there YOU ARE LOOKING FOR ATTENTION good or bad, young or old. So this whole amanda todd thing I could care less. No one would even know who the hell she was if she wasn't a dumb bimbo and plastered herself all over the web. That's like posting an epic fail video of yourself on youtube, then wondering why everyone at school is making fun of you wtf? FOR REAL. We don't need more laws, we don't even need more nice people, what we need is for PARENTS TO STOP BABYING YOUR KIDS AND TEACH YOUR KIDS MENTAL TOUGHNESS AND SELF ESTEEM, IN OTHER WORDS TEACH THEM TO GROW A PAIR! and for schools to start teaching kids about the "real" internet and what kind of bad things can happen not just to others but to them as well, like going to jail for posting on facebook or twiter.

so any time i hear/read these stories in my country or not, i just look at it like they let that problem go because anything that makes the internet look all big bad and scarey is great for them passing what ever laws they want.
edit on 30-10-2012 by ~widowmaker~ because: bunnies made me




posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:03 AM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix
You Canadians need to get a clue.

They don't have the technology or the resources to trace and monitor everyone in Canada 24/7. That's just paranoia.


I regularly talk with Geist as he is in our FB group and what your saying is completely false,with the implementation of CETA and TPP using a VPN in Canada will be useless as the government will be able to request the data from any Country that is affiliated with it.
You could use a zombie but if I am not mistaken that is considered hacking and now is a terrorist activity.As for encrypting anything can be un encrypted,unless your using your own algorithm most encryptions are easily broken.

As for the technology your right it will cost 10s of millions of dollars and will be bankrolled by the Telecoms themselves as mandated in these bills and the cost will then be passed onto the consumer.

Below is just one aspect they are looking into .



Are CRIA and the MPA-Canada Now Opposed to Canadian Content Rules?
Friday October 12, 2012
This week, the government was formally included in the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations with the next formal round scheduled for New Zealand in early December. I've written extensively about the copyright implications of the TPP as leaked versions of the intellectual property chapter and demands from U.S. copyright lobby groups point to a significant re-write of Bill C-11. Areas targeted for reform in Canada include ISP liability, statutory damages, and extending the term of copyright.

An additional issue has begun to attract increasing attention as the same lobby groups seeking copyright reforms have also put dismantling Canadian content regulations on the table. The IIPA, the lead lobby group for the movie, music, and software industries, told the U.S. government:

IIPA strongly believes that the TPP market access chapters must be comprehensive in scope, strictly avoiding any sectoral carve outs that preclude the application of free trade disciplines. We note that several market access barriers cited by USTR in its 2012 National Trade Estimate report on Canada involve, for example, content quota requirements for television, radio, cable television, direct-to-home broadcast services, specialty television, and satellite radio services. It should be possible to address such barriers to trade in the TPP, and thus augment consumers’ access to diverse content, while promoting local cultural expressions.

Many concerned with Canadian culture have reacted with alarm as the U.S. government has focused on potential changes to television and radio content requirements, classification systems for movies, and online video.

The lobbying effort by the IIPA also raises the question of where the Canadian branches of those organizations stand since CRIA (or Music Canada) is closely aligned with the RIAA and the MPA-Canada solely represents the U.S. movie studios. CRIA has previously found itself on the opposite side of cultural groups on issues such as private copying and the merits of Bill C-11. With the parent associations now arguing for trade agreements that could target Canadian content requirements, do CRIA and MPA-Canada share the same views or are they now opposed to the policy position of the RIAA and MPAA? As David Farrell noted earlier this week, the issue has met with "stony silence from the music industry, musicians and other parties with vested interests in the topic."

edit on 30-10-2012 by canDarian because: (no reason given)
edit on 30-10-2012 by canDarian because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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The ideal in the fascist security state is for all activity to be criminalized unless undertaken by license from the central authority. This is the final destination that our society in Canada is moving toward. I suspect that this is a world wide trend.

Just enunciating the trend line sounds like the babbling of a crackpot, because the incremental increase in authoritarianism in our societies is happening in the "boil them slowly" manner.

Italian fascism is the prototype that gives the best picture of how our societies are being re-organized along authoritarian, post-democratic lines. The lobbyists, the NGOs, the special interest groups, corporations, law enforcement agencies together with the prison industrial complex are all pushing an agenda from the standpoint of segments of the production capacity of the nation, like the Italian syndicates, that seeks to impose an order on society independantly of legislators who represent the people as a whole. Democracy is the old paradigm. It is being discarded because it impedes the efforts of some segments of society to acquire maximum wealth and control.

The chief benefit (from the viewpoint of the neophyte Nazis of this era) of this political evolution/devolution is that society then reflects the wishes of coporations and other organized interests and eliminates "non-stakeholders" from any say in how society should organize itself.

Nazi Germany shows you what can happen to non-stakeholders in a fascist state.
edit on 30-10-2012 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 07:22 AM
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One could actually make the case that advocating warrantless searches, which are against current laws and against long standing traditions of law in our society, is an act of sedition.

I'm not saying that people who advocate the dismantling of traditional Canadian democracy should be hanged.

I'm exaggerating the point to make it clear how serious a violation of democratic social order this onset of fascism is.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 08:28 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 




You Canadians need to get a clue.


You just have it all figured out don't you


I don't know where you are from but here in Canada many telecommunications and internet providers are the same company so therefore they can also get access to your call records, text messages, and e-mails via our smart phones without warrant. Sure some of that can be encrypted but it's the principal of the matter that worries me, not what they might actually find.

Sure I could just not have a smart phone, but I need it for work purposes. I know, I'm part of the problem per say as I am wrapped up in the "matrix" but I have to provide for myself and am one of those who has to work for a living and I do not have the option to get off the grid at this time.

This is not about how to block these elected criminals of ours from accessing our information, it's about them having the right to do so without warrant or having to let us know about it.

Do you think that is something that we should just sit down and accept?

Where do we draw the line?



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 09:59 AM
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Corporatism/Fascism is a disease with a well known pathology which tends to usurp the normal methods by which people in a democratic society make their will known. It tends to make "the people" as individuals impotent to effect public policy.

Canadian society is coming down with this disease.

It is typical of Americans to opt for the individual remedy for the disease and it is typical of Canadians to demand an all inclusive solution from our elected representatives. In our part of the world its "United We Stand".



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by boncho

Originally posted by FFS4000
reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


But if it's being tagged onto the 'protecting the children on the internet', anyone who goes against it will be labelled a kiddy fiddler. You know it, i know, most sane people know it, but the idiots and the press ( are they really 2 different sets of people ?) will just set people up as supporting kiddy fiddling.

I F%^&*£G hate how they try and hide something in things



The irony here being that Vic Toews knocked up the family's babysitter which many would consider predatory behaviour.


The fact Vic Toews was secretly boinking the family’s teenage babysitter for years, impregnated her at 20 years of age (which finally led to the divorce) then refused to pay child support payments of $800/month to his first wife as she continued to raise their children should be known by EVERY Canadian.
*


o0o0oh that's rich! I did not know this, thanks for sharing. Can you dig up anything where someone is confronting him on this? Press maybe? pffft, I doubt it.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by FlySolo
 


I looked really deeply into this. Even for a short youtube clip. But all sources I found where things that I wouldn't consider to be legit sources (blogs, open journalism) So just like every other dirty politician, he gets to walk away from all allegations. Journalists NEVER ask the right questions and the people who want to ask the questions never get picked to ask the questions. I would LOVE for someone to confront Vic about this... but it is likely it will never happen... shame.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by TheSparrowSings
 


Well something like this would most certainly squash any C-30 bill if this was exposed. I'm disappointed in CBC, they used to be a reliable.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 12:33 PM
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Regardless of the views presented the fact of the matter is that this bill leaves itself open for abuse by anyone in government and/or law enforcement.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 01:01 PM
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Here is something that just showed up on my FB, for people who are interested.

OpenMedia.ca

The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police has called on the government to revive the invasive Online Spying Bill C-30, granting warrantless access to the private data of citizens.

Law-abiding Canadians shouldn't have to compromise their online security and privacy. If our police chiefs and government want to target criminals, they need to start over in crafting legislation for that purpose.

Speak out against the intrusive Online Spying Bill C-30 at StopSpying.ca...
Read more about C - 30 Here
edit on 30/10/2012 by TheSparrowSings because: (no reason given)
edit on 30/10/2012 by TheSparrowSings because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by FlySolo
reply to post by TheSparrowSings
 


Well something like this would most certainly squash any C-30 bill if this was exposed. I'm disappointed in CBC, they used to be a reliable.


Everybody is afraid of Stephen Harper, even CBC....especially CBC.
brice



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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Originally posted by canDarian

Originally posted by JohnPhoenix
You Canadians need to get a clue.

They don't have the technology or the resources to trace and monitor everyone in Canada 24/7. That's just paranoia.


I regularly talk with Geist as he is in our FB group and what your saying is completely false,with the implementation of CETA and TPP using a VPN in Canada will be useless as the government will be able to request the data from any Country that is affiliated with it.
You could use a zombie but if I am not mistaken that is considered hacking and now is a terrorist activity.As for encrypting anything can be un encrypted,unless your using your own algorithm most encryptions are easily broken.

As for the technology your right it will cost 10s of millions of dollars and will be bankrolled by the Telecoms themselves as mandated in these bills and the cost will then be passed onto the consumer.

Below is just one aspect they are looking into .



Are CRIA and the MPA-Canada Now Opposed to Canadian Content Rules?
Friday October 12, 2012
This week, the government was formally included in the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations with the next formal round scheduled for New Zealand in early December. I've written extensively about the copyright implications of the TPP as leaked versions of the intellectual property chapter and demands from U.S. copyright lobby groups point to a significant re-write of Bill C-11. Areas targeted for reform in Canada include ISP liability, statutory damages, and extending the term of copyright.

An additional issue has begun to attract increasing attention as the same lobby groups seeking copyright reforms have also put dismantling Canadian content regulations on the table. The IIPA, the lead lobby group for the movie, music, and software industries, told the U.S. government:

IIPA strongly believes that the TPP market access chapters must be comprehensive in scope, strictly avoiding any sectoral carve outs that preclude the application of free trade disciplines. We note that several market access barriers cited by USTR in its 2012 National Trade Estimate report on Canada involve, for example, content quota requirements for television, radio, cable television, direct-to-home broadcast services, specialty television, and satellite radio services. It should be possible to address such barriers to trade in the TPP, and thus augment consumers’ access to diverse content, while promoting local cultural expressions.

Many concerned with Canadian culture have reacted with alarm as the U.S. government has focused on potential changes to television and radio content requirements, classification systems for movies, and online video.

The lobbying effort by the IIPA also raises the question of where the Canadian branches of those organizations stand since CRIA (or Music Canada) is closely aligned with the RIAA and the MPA-Canada solely represents the U.S. movie studios. CRIA has previously found itself on the opposite side of cultural groups on issues such as private copying and the merits of Bill C-11. With the parent associations now arguing for trade agreements that could target Canadian content requirements, do CRIA and MPA-Canada share the same views or are they now opposed to the policy position of the RIAA and MPAA? As David Farrell noted earlier this week, the issue has met with "stony silence from the music industry, musicians and other parties with vested interests in the topic."

edit on 30-10-2012 by canDarian because: (no reason given)
edit on 30-10-2012 by canDarian because: (no reason given)


Jude11 is complaining in another thread that Canada got this idea from the US, but if what you say it true ( and I have no knowledge on CETA and TPP ) then Canada is way more draconian than the USA,

Sure they can request info from the VPN but thats not going to do any good if the VPN doesn't keep logs. They are not required to due to their nature of being a Virtual Private Network in most places. You simply have to choose one of these, read their terms and conditions, FAQ carefully.Using the Tor Browser ensures that all links the VPN sees are encrypted, which the VPN doesn't keep anyway.

I think the movie and music industry needs to change it's delivery method to a type thats not copyable. All this is their fault to begin with. You cant seriously expect someone not to copy something if you make it easy for them and then get mad when they do. That borders on entrapment.

For real crimes like sex crimes against children, crimes that are horrible and hurt peoples lives, the cops should follow due process. We are supposed to be innocent until proven guilty. Cops should have reasonable suspicion of a crime, then go get a warrant, then collect evidence to prove the case in a court. Anything more is an invasion of our rights to privacy.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


The Witch Hunt Begins ....

Loosing Privacy from Fear ( Mongering ) by a so Few


look Up the Balance & see the insanity ..

A New kind of Monitering

Orwell was Right ....




The Inquisition what a Show !!!!


Torquemada Would of Love this !!

NEXT!!!! In The NEar Future !!



The Dream Police Ohh NO!!!! ( Cheap Trick )

The dream police, they live inside of my head.
The dream police, they come to me in my bed.
The dream police, they're coming to arrest me, oh no.

You know that talk is cheap, and those rumors ain't nice.
And when I fall asleep I don't think I'll survive the night, the night.

'Cause they're waiting for me.
They're looking for me.
Ev'ry single night they're driving me insane.
Those men inside my brain.

I try to sleep, they're wide awake, they won't leave me alone.
They don't get paid to take vacations, or let me alone.
They spy on me, I try to hide, they won't let me alone.
They persecute me, they're the judge and jury all in one



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


I do try to be one step ahead of the game. LOL.. I agree with you, of course. We fight these things all the time, remember SOPA and it's twin PIPA? Little by little they are eroding our rights to privacy. If they can't pass bills like this they will hide parts of it in other bills and disguise them with twisting words. Most of us aren't criminals or pedophiles and we don't want the censorship or spying. I do hope you guys can find ways to beat this like we beat SOPA and PIPA so far.. it's just not that easy sometimes when TPTB are so conniving. Could these things help fight crime? Of course, but it can also set the path for a full blown take over and control of our internet usage bringing us into a true 1984 state. Thats too much to ask. The ends do not justify the means.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Thank you for the clarification on your opinion


I must admit your first post I responded to may have been misunderstood on my behalf.

And thank you, I hope we find a way to beat this too.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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To all of you who found this topic to be interesting, you will probably also want to see my new thread which kind of touches on how the whole world is in on it, including the UN...are we surprised though?

UN Calls for Worldwide Internet Surveillance and Data Retention in the Name of Fighting Terrorism



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


Good to see other people in other countries standing up to the idiotic legislation that is only meant to strip away our personal freedoms.

Thanks for spreading awareness. It is appreciated.





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