Threads of Gold: Opinion -- Which Holds Greater Potential, Space Mining or Breakthroughs in Plasma P

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posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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There aren't as many common threads as you'd think holding cultures together -- through the series of natural disasters humans call "history". In fact, iirc the science fiction writer Frank Herbert once said, "Progress is an idea that humans cling to in order to distract themselves from the horror of natural disaster." He also had an awful lot to say about "He who controls the Spice".
But that's another topic.

Back to common threads: Religions come and go, genepools fill and fail, entire countries occasionally sink beneath the waves, and cities burn in volcanic Hells or are buried by laharas. But some things stay the same. Just because life changes for humans doesn't mean things change for physics. What's possible tomorrow is possible today, and was possible yesterday, and in existence always. But we don't quite see that far, with our little human eyes.

For thousands of years, perhaps for more than that, scientists, mystics, sorcerors, and kings have been searching for the secrets of long life, great strength, good weather, favor with the gods, resistance to disease and illness, and abundant wealth. Yes, they sometimes go Buddha and search for other things too, but in most cases it is the material need of the world's denizens that drive the material value of the world, and it is those factors that drive the cycle of life itself.

What is my point? Well, most of you have heard of alchemy. All of you have heard of mining. And very few of you have not heard that soon, the space race will envelop the industry of mining -- or vice versa -- soon, automated shuttles will be zipping in and out of earth's atmosphere, carrying precious loads of Helium 3 and rare earths, gold, silver, and platinum, rare gems, you name it. Earth will be enriched beyond our wildest dreams, in terms of material wealth, if the space race is permitted to extend into the world of capitalism.

There is a company in Bellevue, Washington, that has a vested interest in mining asteroids, moons, planets, and more. It's called Planetary Resources and it just started up. They are hiring all kinds of people, but they really needed GAC mechanics and stuff like that last time I checked. This is a very exciting thing to read, because I used to be quite interested in NASA as a child (in a limited capacity, I understood the need to reach the stars as being very fundamentally linked to human experience and survival). Too many teachers try to herd their young scientists into the medical field, or into making better lightbulbs -- something equally banal. Not to say that medicine isn't a lofty aim -- I give at least as much time to that fine subject as any other, combined. But back to space travel...

The funny thing about technology booms is that there are often so many choices hanging low enough for us humans to reach, we don't know which one to take. And maybe even we go back in time a little, cling to what was popular last decade, last century -- we pretend to be ignorant and helpless because growing up takes too much effort. Or does it take more effort to lie?

How many of you read about CERN? If you read about CERN, you're definitely not stupid -- you either know something about nuclear science or you know something about chemistry, or both. Maybe you know something about gravity or time, and that led you to start researching the LHCs and Uranverein. But ultimately, some of you who went down the CERN rabbit hole found the issue of transmutation to be a central goal, whether expressedly or not.

Well, let me tell you something. If you didn't see it on the local rack, there was a new magazine last Spring. Around February, a rag called "IDEAS AND DISCOVERIES" Magazine hit the press. It had a whole lot of different content. It was pretty much a CT variety show for people who score high on the Stanford Binet LOL. But it had one very interesting article about binary star fusion.

The article said that binary star fusion, under the eyes of scientists, had answered the question of where gold comes from. Scientists said that when two stars, two perfectly matched and balanced stars, begin to annihilate each other, or rather fuse together, this intricate and beautiful process begins to manifest single atoms of pure gold. So I would imagine these pieces congeal into nuggets, or else are flung far out into space (because this is a magnetic process after all! and gold is VERY remotely reactive!!! magic even!) to be caught by the gravity of planets and other stars.

Well, you can see that there is somewhat of a dilemma here. I guess people should be wondering, what costs more, sending people into space for rocks, or simulating space so that the people here can manufacture rocks. Either method, frankly, sounds very wasteful if it can't be maximized. And we don't have space for REAL binary star fusion on eart -- but would that work at a smaller scale, if you COULD isolate two plasmas and PRETEND that they were binary stars? Nature doesn't care as long as the transmutation is balanced.

Isaac Newton: "Nature appears to be delighted with transmutations".

To sum up this horribly rambling article, I guess I want to know what readers think about precious metals and the space race, and what they think about precious metals and the CERN hush-hush on processes for terrestrial metal production.

I.E. I heard palladium glass was possible to make in a LHC or other machine, assuming you don't mind having an isotope with a radioactive halflife and all that. In this case, palladium seems decent in spite of this because the frequency of the radiation is very low iirc. It's not like living in a microwave in other words, if you live in a radioactive palladium house, it's not keyed to kill. In fact, I've proposed a building method involving nanoplasma and palladium isotope -- the robot would look like a plasma gun on wheels or arms, and it would extrude material like a glue gun to produce skyscrapers instead of men having to use cranes and pulleys to haul up large and dangerous pieces of material, like I-Beams and girders. Those are things of the past. Modular dwellings built to your specific need are the future. Not the death traps they try to sell you in the cities. Those are the places of the dead.

I want to know what the Living People think about the world they live in.

Thoughts/comments/gripes/critiques?





posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 01:26 AM
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Some links to a few things mentioned above:


Space Mining:
SMITHSONIAN BLOG
blogs.smithsonianmag.com...
April 23, 2012

Truth is, the next chapter in American space exploration may be more likely to unfold in Seattle tomorrow when a startup called Planetary Resources has its coming-out news conference. Last week it sent out a cryptic press release, announcing that the company “will overlay two critical sectors–space exploration and natural resources–to add trillions of dollars to the global GDP.” Analysts offered an instant translation: It plans to mine asteroids.




www.planetaryresources.com...
PLANETARY RESOURCES

Asteroids are the best real estate in the Solar System.
Despite their celestial age, our understanding of asteroids is still in its infancy. However, the more we learn about them, the more enticing destinations they become.

Asteroids are primordial material left over from the formation of the Solar System. They are scattered throughout it: some pass close to the Sun, and others are found out beyond the orbit of Neptune. A vast majority have been collected by Jupiter’s gravity into a belt between it and Mars – an area known as the Main Belt. As it turns out, we have been discovering thousands of asteroids that do not belong to the Main Belt, but instead pass near Earth’s orbit – nearly 9,000 to date, with almost a thousand more discovered every year.

Many of these near-Earth asteroids are easily accessible from Earth. And many contain enormous quantities of accessible resources.


These people steal from our blogs, by the way. They don't get this stuff on their own... they troll for better writers and steal their freaking theories and dumb them down for the public. Sigh... freedom of the press.


How Precious Metals Form:
news.nationalgeographic.com...
Silver in Space: Metal Found to Form in Distinct Star Explosions
Astronomers decode nuclear recipe for precious metal forged in supernovae.

Andrew Fazekas
for National Geographic News
Published September 7, 2012

It's long been known that earthly metals like gold and silver were forged in supernova explosions, but the metals' exact origins have been shrouded in mystery. Now a new study has identified the unique nuclear recipe for silver in space.

While most common light elements like hydrogen and helium were formed in the big bang, heavier elements like carbon and oxygen are formed within stars through nuclear fusion.

Rare heavy metals like silver and gold, however, need the most extreme stellar environments to form—found only during the explosions of massive stars, or supernovae. (See supernovae pictures.)



www.ideasanddiscoveries.com...

iD #7: The Secret Freemason Files
(this is the issue that has the gold article in it)

For centuries members of this clandestine society have been suspected of pulling the strings behind the scenes. Even today Freemasons are still thought of as covertly endeavoring to rule the world. But is it possible they're already in charge?

With purported ties to organizations as diverse as the Mafia, the CIA, and the KKK, and an alleged stronghold in Washington D.C. dating back to the time of America's Founding Fathers, Freemasons are not written about in textbooks but have nevertheless had a tremendous impact on the history of the world.

Its members are sworn to secrecy, so very few things are known about this ancient order. It's also not known what percentage of a government apparatus must be in the hands of an organization for it to control a nation's political system.

Read about Freemason history and their modern potential in this issue of iD, as well as an account of the power of ancient symbols such as the cross, the pentagram, the swastika, and the Eye of Providence atop the pyramid on the back of the one-dollar bill.

edit on 4-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: ideas and discoveries



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 02:15 AM
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I think what you suggest is the most exciting thing in our futures if we can just get through the short term to get there. As soon as they establish a routine means of getting up to, mining and then returning with whatever minerals and resources are within reasonable range....It's on and no limits anymore.

Like you say... lol.. Capitalism. In this case, it would be the grease to make the wheels spin real fast. All the wealth coming back down in rares and probably more under than heading than we can guess at now, it'll be churned into what business generally does with money. Expanding, getting better and making more of it.

Oh...if the pathetic little 17-18 billion NASA get's tossed as a total working budget these days suddenly spiraled into 100's of billions across private companies all out for themselves......I'll bet we have men eating dinner on Mars within a decade or less from the time the 'Space Rush' becomes real in technology to do it with.



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 02:27 AM
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IMHO the 2nd one more than the first, but it's actually more like growing gold. Similar to the way we grow crystals...but with less yang and more yin
Or diffusion/fusion instead of fission

If you google 3d printing there are many people on to the idea of printing structures...its on the horizon so to speak.

Many wonderful things in store for the future...but the energy and food issues need to be addressed first.

...not sure if you knew this, but they have detected gold particles forming while bombarding radioactive materials with plasma...I believe it was a uranium plate. It may have been a CERN like facility too. The hitch was the temps generated also vaporized the gold immediately after detection...tricky conundrum that one is


Spice indeed, have you tried any? I don't think I would like to pay the price...the long term one
Chasing immortality we already have...IMHO again.

edit on 10/4/2012 by Drala because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by Drala
 


Thanks to you both!

Exciting to hear about the uranium plate and gold manufacturing, phototelectric alchemy is REAL???
OMG off to read...

@ first poster; yes, I think Capitalism will serve its purpose with the space race, just like the book Cradle of Saturn -- except in that book, there was a catch -- earth got partly destroyed by a protoplanet of Jupiter.

I think what's in order is an idea magnificent enough to inspire some bored cads in the billionaire circles.
Planetary Resources and other companies are just the tip of the spear; I hope we keep seeing real progress and that automation overcomes the possibility of terrorism. When craft get cheaper and more expendable, people won't cringe as much when we lose a few rockets. People don't need to get brain damaged to take advantage of space.

If only people had listened to Tesla, we would have had remote controlled craft a hundred years ago, but instead we raced Russia to put men into space and now they all have brain damage (as evidence by recent passings). Tesla knew how to radio control submarines, which would also have partly circumvented the losses sustained by the Nazis as well as Allies during WW2; the mortality rate for the UBoat men was about 60% near the end of the war. Very bad odds, and not even necessary that people should die.


The tragedy of our age is the cheapness of human life. The Pharaohs and others understood the basic sacredness of the simple and God rewarded their instinct to nurture.

I believe poster #2 in regards to food being more important than the space race.
I try to write about modular greenhouses, vertical farming, and greenhouses in blimps, etc.

The modular skyscraper idea would also be wonderful for urban farms, which would free the farmlands and the wilderness of the yoke of supporting the cities. If you make the surfaces of the buildings porous like a rock face, trees and other plants can simply grow into the building itself once the area is ready to support life.

So many good ideas went to the grave with Tesla and others... like singing cities, crystal palaces, electric waterfalls...



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 03:22 PM
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Media updates on space mining, Oct 5 2012


www.slate.com...

Job Listing of the Week: “Asteroid Miner”
By Slate Staff | Posted Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012, at 5:56 PM ET
Looking for a career switch? The much-hyped startup Planetary Resources is looking for interns next winter with this irresistible pitch: “Do you want to be an Asteroid Miner?”
They are ripping off our thread, yo!


bellevue.patch.com...

Asteroid Mining Company in Bellevue Seeks Interns
If you're looking for an engineering internship, working for a company planning to mine asteroids could be interesting on a resume.
By Venice Buhain Email the author 10:36 am

Planetary Resources, the Bellevue company that announced plans to mine asteroids this year, is taking applications now for internships.

The company, which plans to foray into space and explore near-earth asteroids with its Arkyd-100 spacecraft within two years, is looking for college juniors and seniors studying aerospace, mechanical, electrical or computer systems engineering; engineering physics; engineering mechanics or computer science, according to the company's application.

The job will be from January through August 2013, according to the application.

Planetary Resources involves ex-NASA and ex-Microsoft employees, as well as a star-studded slate of investors and advisers, including Google's Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, filmmaker James Cameron and Microsoft's former Chief Software Architect Charles Simonyi, who has traveled to space as a tourist aboard Russian Soyuz crafts.

The company, founded by Eric Anderson and Peter H. Diamandis, is banking that the future of space
edit on 5-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: links



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
I think what you suggest is the most exciting thing in our futures if we can just get through the short term to get there. As soon as they establish a routine means of getting up to, mining and then returning with whatever minerals and resources are within reasonable range....It's on and no limits anymore.

Like you say... lol.. Capitalism. In this case, it would be the grease to make the wheels spin real fast. All the wealth coming back down in rares and probably more under than heading than we can guess at now, it'll be churned into what business generally does with money. Expanding, getting better and making more of it.

Oh...if the pathetic little 17-18 billion NASA get's tossed as a total working budget these days suddenly spiraled into 100's of billions across private companies all out for themselves......I'll bet we have men eating dinner on Mars within a decade or less from the time the 'Space Rush' becomes real in technology to do it with.


Could not agree more. Whats needed is change in international law to allow private property rights to be applied to celestial bodies. That will unlock the greed motive thats underpinned every other expansion in human history.

The current arrangement seems specifically designed to hold us back. You would almost think it was done on purpose.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 06:01 PM
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Lets spend all the earths money and resources making Gold.
at lest you die rich !

does gold make you happy?
no the things you buy with it.

Evil. evil that you will make othere starve and die.
just so you can have the most gold.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by buddha
Lets spend all the earths money and resources making Gold.
at lest you die rich !

does gold make you happy?
no the things you buy with it.

Evil. evil that you will make othere starve and die.
just so you can have the most gold.


WTF.

Gold is a component of electronics. Therefore it's an important component of medical equipment and communications devices.

It can be broken down into nanoparticles and ingested as a dietary aid. It is one of the most remotely reactive elements in the universe and has amazing electromagnetic properties still barely understood.

More gold on earth = more quality equipment for space travel, jewelry, art, electronics and communications, energy pursuits, you name it!

There would be fewer wars being fought over precious metals and rare earths. For example, the Kuril and Senkaku islands conflicts. Aren't you tired of that? What about African depopulation for tantalum and charcoal and diamonds? Is that right?

I don't believe white lives are worth more than black lives -- solving the space crisis would enrich life on earth and remove the edge from many industries. It would take power out of the warmongers' hands. No more oil men running the world.

More gold = better batteries, cars that go faster and farther, more efficient electrical connections and byways.

I don't see how manufacturing gold or mining gold in space affects the amount of food on earth.
Maybe you didn't see the part where the craft are unmanned.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:12 AM
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SpaceX to Restock International Space Station


lightyears.blogs.cnn.com...

October 5th, 2012
06:29 PM ET
SpaceX to launch flight to space station
For SpaceX, every flight is the real deal. It’s that way for any rocket company. But this time around, more than in the past, the private company contracted with NASA is flying without a safety net.

Sunday, if all goes well, at 8:30 p.m. ET, a Falcon 9 Rocket with a Dragon capsule on top will lift off from launch pad 40 at Cape Canaveral, Florida.

This will be the first of a dozen NASA-contracted flights to resupply the international space Station, at a total cost of $1.6 billion.

Symbolically, this flight is huge. In May, SpaceX carried out a successful test flight that attached a spacecraft to the international space station, making it the first company to do so. But if something had gone wrong, another test flight would have been put in place. Now, there's no alternative.

On this flight, the Dragon capsule is filled with 1,000 pounds of cargo, everything from low-sodium food kits to clothing and computer hard drives.

Much of Dragon’s cargo is material to support extensive experimentation aboard the space station. One deals with plant growth. Plants here on earth use about 50% of their energy for support to overcome gravity. Researchers want to understand how the genes that control that process would operate in microgravity – when objects are in free-fall in space. Down the road, that could benefit food supplies here on the planet.

The spacecraft is also carrying nearly two dozen microgravity experiments designed and being flown through the Student Experiment Spaceflight Program. More than 100 students and teachers and family members will be at Cape Canaveral for the launch.

SpaceX is not the only commercial company in the spacefaring business. Within the next few months, Orbital Sciences is expected to fly its own demonstration flight to the space station. But Orbital is not using Cape Canaveral as its launch site. The company’s rocket will take off from Wallops Island of the coast of Virginia. Orbital has a nearly $2 billion contract with NASA for station resupply missions.

Of course, SpaceX founder Elon Musk is looking well beyond just these cargo flights to the Station. SpaceX is one of three companies - Boeing and Sierra Nevada are the other two - NASA has selected to continue work developing a human rated spacecraft that would carry astronauts to the International Space Station. The SpaceX plan is to modify the Dragon capsule to carry people.

Musk said in a previous interview with CNN, “We believe firmly we can send astronauts to the space station within three years of receiving a NASA contract.” Right now, the United States must rely on Russia to get astronauts to the station at a cost of about $60 million a seat. Musk believes he can get the job done for a seat price of about $20 million.

So far, SpaceX has made the ongoing transition from the Space Shuttle to private ferry flights look somewhat easy. But Musk admits there is nothing easy about rocket science. “When I started SpaceX it's not as though I thought rockets were easy. I mean, I did think they were hard. But, it ended up being even harder than that.”

If the launch goes off on time Sunday, the Dragon spacecraft will catch up with the Space Station early Wednesday morning. Station Commander Sunita Williams and Aki Hoshide from the Japanese Space Agency will use the robotic arm to grab Dragon and berth it to the station.

In late October, Dragon will head back to Earth for splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.


PLanetary Resouces seeking interns in Bellevue Seattle (LOL @ people reading the psychic threads, you should read this one too):


redmond.patch.com...

Asteroid Mining Company in Bellevue Seeks Interns
If you're looking for an engineering internship, working for a company planning to mine asteroids could be interesting on a resume.
By Venice Buhain Email the author October 5, 2012
Planetary Resources, the Bellevue company that this year announced plans to mine asteroids, is taking applications now for internships.

The company, which plans to foray into space and explore near-earth asteroids with its Arkyd-100 spacecraft within two years, is looking for college juniors and seniors studying aerospace, mechanical, electrical or computer systems engineering; engineering physics; engineering mechanics or computer science, according to the company's application.

The job will be from January through August 2013, according to the application.

Planetary Resources involves ex-NASA and ex-Microsoft employees, as well as a star-studded slate of investors and advisers, including Google's Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, filmmaker James Cameron and Microsoft's former Chief Software Architect Charles Simonyi, who has traveled to space as a tourist aboard Russian Soyuz crafts.

The company, founded by Eric Anderson and Peter H. Diamandis, is banking that the future of space exploration depends on being able to gather resources in space.

The company's first missions will use robots, though human miners are expected to be employed in the future, officials said, and the company's first prospecting Arkyd-100 spacecraft could launch within two years, said Chris Lewicki, president and chief engineer at a press conference earlier this year.

Get Bellevue's news and information from Bellevue Patch on Facebook and Twitter.

More information
Planetary Resources Internship Application
edit on 7-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: PR



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:47 AM
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First off, we can't really advance in space too far if the means to crack planets isn't available. We would mine the resources, and have more, okay. But, then what?

Some threads back about some other issue recently, that I can not recall at the moment, I mentioned something I've worked on that actually addresses this same, realized issue. The problem right now, as mentioned here is that research is not always receiving the funding it needs. And rest assured, while expensive, this one is actually something needed and not just desired.

The work and designs are for a low-energy expense, quark producing generator array. For a more basic explanation, it's an energy "recycler" that produces quarks from plasma, at which point's energy is funneled through a type of processor that cools down the energy into various elements based upon periodical data. Gold or other elements are then "created out of thin air" using energy-to-mass formulas that differ respectively for each batch of element desired for production. And again, its all using a very minimal amount of energy to accomplish this task, so its not the design here so much as the process and/or steps involved to achieve the results desired.

DARPA may have a shot at this (I'm private) but this particular "idea (prior patent, soon)" hasn't been sent with anything else already. All for that one reason, too. Money. Not what I'd like, mind you, but rather just production, containment, and acquisition costs. You'd literally be surprised at how much is held back "until a later date," when the primary or immediate r&d needs are on protection (more expensive in the long run than weapon systems are.)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 02:03 AM
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Thanks for posting!
You're right, I would be sick and sad to know what's been "shelved for a later date".

The concept of manufacturing specific elements based on electromagnetic controls is very fascinating.

I've been wondering if this could be done with vacuum/photoelectric effect, or if as you say, the LHCs hold the key to manufacturing elements on demand.

I wonder though if scientists might underestimate the "backlash" of such a machine and fail to account for that.

It really sounds like we need a space station far enough from earth to prevent accidents, a place to test space travel prototypes and such things, like the plasma experiments you referenced... what better place than a planet or moon already bereft of life? Nothing wasted, yet everything ventured.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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Originally posted by KhufuKeplerTriangle

It really sounds like we need a space station far enough from earth to prevent accidents, a place to test space travel prototypes and such things, like the plasma experiments you referenced... what better place than a planet or moon already bereft of life? Nothing wasted, yet everything ventured.


You're right on the money with this, though it wouldn't be so much for the reason of accident prevention as other things. From a strategic standpoint, launching any space vehicle/base/weapon is risky. It's essentially a large floating free-for-all-to-see target. Modern applications all use a method for now where if weapon is used, for instance, it's used in a way where it is only up there in its weakest defensive position for but a moment. Missiles, rail guns, and even redirected lasers are shot up from a heavily defended location, then come back down onto their respective targets.

Putting any kind of expensive equipment up there rotating the earth in and out of defensible zones is walking a tight rope, and far too risky for most things. Until the day we can cloak full spectrum, its not a good idea. Only internationally shared space programs would ensure they weren't destroyed during wartime... and we all know how hard that is to get off of the ground.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by SoulVisions
 


Thank you for the reply.


Are you interested in X-37B and that stuff? I was reading about Prompt Global Strike last year and wondered... hmmm! lol


I wonder what type of vehicles with what kinds of doo-hickeys Planetary Resources will ultimately use.
Is there a way to render ore in space with nothing but electricity? It would be very efficient, as the metal would cool again and harvested @@ in the vacuum of space!

You could also shatter a rock and use a magnet to collect bits of the ore. I guess! XD

I am a noob when it comes to space.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:36 AM
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Wanted to add a conversation from another thread (Germany demanding its gold back) to this thread:

Originally posted by KhufuKeplerTriangle

Mercury-manganese star
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A mercury-manganese star is a type of chemically peculiar star with a prominent spectral line at 398.4 nm, due to absorption from ionized mercury.[1] These stars are of spectral type B8, B9, or A0, corresponding to surface temperatures between about 10,000 and 15,000 K, with two distinctive characteristics:
An atmospheric excess of elements like phosphorus, manganese, gallium, strontium, yttrium, zirconium, platinum and mercury.
A lack of a strong dipole magnetic field.
Their rotation is relatively slow, and as a consequence their atmosphere is relatively calm. It is thought, but has not been proven, that some types of atoms sink under the force of gravity, while others are lifted towards the exterior of the star by radiation pressure, making an inhomogeneous atmosphere.[2]



A type of manganese star the spectrum of which has a prominent line at 3984 Å due absorption by ionized mercury. A bright example is Alpheratz (Alpha Andromedae).


This must be my lucky star because I love the Pegasus very much, he is the Creator of Sources and the liberator of the muse,


Alpha Andromedae (Alpha And, α And, α Andromedae), which has the traditional names Alpheratz (or Alpherat) and Sirrah (or Sirah), is the brightest star in the constellation of Andromeda.

Located immediately northeast of the constellation of Pegasus, it is the northeastern star of the Great Square of Pegasus.[5][11] As a connecting star to Pegasus, it is also known as δ Pegasi, though this name is no longer used (another such doubly named connecting star is β Tauri).[11][12] It is located 97 light-years from Earth.

Although it appears to the naked eye as a single star, with overall apparent visual magnitude +2.06, it is actually a binary system composed of two stars in close orbit. The chemical composition of the brighter of the two stars is unusual as it is a mercury-manganese star whose atmosphere contains abnormally high levels of mercury, manganese, and other elements, including gallium and xenon.[7][13] It is the brightest mercury-manganese star known.[13]
This star has for long been treated as being in Pegasus and simultaneously in Andromeda, and Johann Bayer catalogued it as both α Andromedae and δ Pegasi.


OH MY GOD. This is creeping me out, this is the answer to your question, and Pegasus is the example, weird!

it is actually a binary system composed of two stars in close orbit. The chemical composition of the brighter of the two stars is unusual as it is a mercury-manganese star whose atmosphere contains abnormally high levels of mercury,


When a mercury rich star, like the above, is in a binary relationship with another, I believe gold can be created.



I love this website it's very inspiring.

~Dashes away

P.S.

The names Alpheratz and Sirrah both derive from the Arabic name, سرة الفرس surrat al-faras "the navel of the mare". (سرة alone is surra.) The word horse reflects the star's historical placement in Pegasus.[27] Another term for this star used by medieval astronomers writing in Arabic was راس المراة المسلسلة rās al-mar'a al-musalsala "the head of the woman in chains",[27] the chained woman here being Andromeda. Other Arabic names include al-kaff al-khaḍīb and kaff al-naṣīr.[28]

In the Hindu lunar zodiac, this star, together with the other stars in the Great Square of Pegasus (α, β, and γ Pegasi), makes up the nakshatras of Pūrva Bhādrapadā and Uttara Bhādrapadā.[27]

In Chinese, 壁宿 (Bì Sù), meaning wall, refers to an asterism consisting of α Andromedae and γ Pegasi.[29] Consequently, α Andromedae itself is known as 壁宿二 (Bì Sù èr, English: the second star of the wall.)[30]
It is also known as one of the "Three Guides" that mark the prime meridian of the heavens, the other two being Beta Cassiopeiae and Gamma Pegasi. It was believed to bless those born under its influence with honour and riches.[31]
edit on 24-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: (no reason given)


www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:36 AM
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reply to post by ~widowmaker~
 


From what I understand of it, earth gains a lot of "space dust" weight per year. A certain amount of that, although negligible, is definitely metallic. It could well be that water, carrying acids and other things, leaches gold particulate from the soil and that explains the occurrence of small nuggets in the water; i.e. gold panning/sluicing for gold.

I don't know what the bigger gold veins etc. on our planet come from. Maybe during its early years, our planet got irradiated by heavy gamma or something, or got hit by some space rocks when our sun ate a protoplanet or small star; that could have yielded our moon, as well.

The number of years we're talking about here is absolutely incomprehensible to me, yet I understand that in order to discuss astronomy and the like, an acceptance of the facts is needed. It could be that our planet was a metallic object ejected from a dying star. It could be the burned out heart of a small star, who knows? Scientists today think the earth's core is either nuclear liquid (which explains polar shifting) or metallic solid (explains magnetic field but... prior theory does too!).

I think the Ideas and Discoveries magazine said two stars fusing yields gold atom by atom (but it could coalesce into large rocks as we said before). Popular Science had an article about silver originating in novas. Which is very beautiful.

Silver is the color of inspiration.
Gold is the color of life.
When both are given to us by the heavens, that is poetic.

but lemme find some refs:

Here you go cutie:


Fusion in the Universe: when a giant star dies...

Submitted by sis on 18 September 2007

More massive stars have a shorter lifetime and more violent destiny. Whereas a star the size of our Sun can live for billions of years, stars that are eight to ten times the mass of our Sun last only millions of years because they rapidly run out of fuel. When this happens, the equilibrium is lost between two fundamental forces: gravity, which tends to contract the matter of the stars; and radiation pressure produced by nuclear fusion reactions in the core, which tends to expand the star. The core contracts to form a neutron star and the outer layers of the star fall inwards and rebound from the very dense core in a gigantic explosion: a Type II supernova.

Waves of particles, including neutrinos, leave the core, carrying the gravitational energy of the collapsing star. The infalling outer layers of the star absorb many of these neutrinos, giving rise to extremely high temperatures – hot enough to trigger the fusion of elements including gold and uranium (as described in Rebusco et al., 2007). A small proportion of these neutrinos, however, escapes the atmosphere of the dying star and can be detected on Earth, in the silence deep below the planet’s surface.


Twisting the heart of a star is a metaphor we've seen before. Do you remember where? How about troubling a star? BlackSun? Fusion projects? Uranverein? Mmmmm??? LOL


Die Glocke
Posted on Thursday, 29 March, 2012 | 3 comments
Columnist: William B Stoecker

During WWII the Germans developed or planned a number of wunderwaffen, or miracle weapons which, Hitler assured his people, would reverse the Reich’s fortunes and lead to victory. The Germans tried to develop a nuclear fission bomb, but, we are told, were stymied by Allied sabotage of their heavy water plant…they needed the heavy water (deuterium oxide) for a nuclear reactor. They developed snorkels for submarines; they built the world’s first truly successful jet fighter, the Me-262; they developed a rocket fighter; they designed the first jet bomber; they experimented with a flying wing aircraft (but there is no evidence that they overcame its control and stability problems); and, of course, they designed and built the powerful V-2 rocket, the first rocket capable of reaching outer space.

German physicist Walter Gerlach made a study of gravity, and he had once suggested that mercury might be transformed into gold by relatively simple means…clearly, he thought outside the box. Farrell and others have suggested that he may have played a major part in Nazi gravity control research, and that the overall project may have been headed by SS Obergruppenfuhrer Hans Kammler, who disappeared at the end of the war. Then there is the case of Austrian researcher Viktor Schauberger, who was fascinated by the esoteric qualities of water and obsessed with implosions and centripetal flows. As has been the case with Nikola Tesla, Schauberger has achieved an almost legendary status, and there are rumors that he developed a kind of turbine called a “repulsine” that could control gravity. Once again, hard proof is lacking.



mercury might be transformed into gold by relatively simple means



Mercury-manganese star
TBC in next post please



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:51 AM
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The easy answer is, space mining holds more potential for any kind of mining. There are infinite planets and moons scattered throughout space.





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