Now tell me thats not the coolest thing you ever seen!

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posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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The 3HP motor got hot, the bearings got hot, the air in the room was heated and circulated, he got an electric bill, things were consumed. Not even close to free. In fact, pretty inefficient overall. Converting electricity, to magnetism, to potential energy, and then to heat. Why not convert electricity to heat directly?




posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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Originally posted by RussianScientists

Originally posted by LUXUS
reply to post by RussianScientists
 


Yes it should heat up too but there are two factors to consider. Firstly that steel (probably cast Iron) top is large and so will act as a heat sink so at best it probably gets warm. Secondly it depends if the magnetic field on the bottom of the disc is shielded or reduced by either distance from the table or the magnetic housing material.




One thing you all are completely forgetting here, is that the magnets are supposed to react and/or create a form of mechanical work on ferrous material; not COPPER which is not FERROUS.


Wrong, induction will heat any material that is a good conductor of electricity but works most rapidly in paramagnetic materials such as iron/steel.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 10:54 AM
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Freaking awesome!!! Bump



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by LUXUS
 


Its the same guy, let me enplane...someone ripped his video and retitled it.

Thanks for that tidbit. So the original guy used a "real" example of induction before using that to fool people even more with his free heat genie. Now I'm even more pissed at him. I hate when snake oil charmers do that.

Why do you suppose some lie on purpose to disinform for glee or profit? Where is their conscience? I think thats why there is going to be great wailing and gnashing of teeth on Judgment Day.

All those who claim "Aww, it was a joke. Can't you take a joke? And the ones who thought they were doing the right thing in the name of god are all going into the sun (the lake of fire).

Sorry, I just get peeeved at all the internet hoaxers...



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by LUXUS
 



Wrong, induction will heat any material that is a good conductor of electricity but works most rapidly in paramagnetic materials such as iron/steel.

If he had used ferrous metal to display his "magnetic induction" hoax, we would have seen sparks coming from where he touched the pipe to the wheel. {Thats) why he used copper.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by LUXUS
 


Wrong, induction will heat any material that is a good conductor of electricity but works most rapidly in paramagnetic materials such as iron/steel.

If he had used ferrous metal to display his "magnetic induction" hoax, we would have seen sparks coming from where he touched the pipe to the wheel. {Thats) why he used copper.
I didn't notice him touching it though he may have...anyway I didn't hear the guy in the video make any hoax claims. If he titled the video as "free", that's probably just ignorance if he doesn't realize his next electric bill will cover the cost of what he did.

I don't like all that noise!! Did anybody else mention that?

Not only is it less noisy, but it's probably more efficient to dump the electricity directly into some heating coils. But for people who don't know about induction heating, it's a cool little home experiment, but I wouldn't call it the coolest thing I've ever seen...that's going a little too far.


Originally posted by mapsurfer_
a 3hp motor not efficient for heating metal. same energy with a heating coil is more efficient, but for this application.. a propane torch would get it done about as cheaply as it could get.
I think that sums it up nicely, thanks mapsurfer_.
edit on 28-9-2012 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 06:34 PM
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Anyone remember the thread with the Coral Castle
and the giant metal Seal of Solomon found on the property?
It was done with opposing magnets around the perimeter.
And when spun very quickly, it could levitate big stones?
I think I have that right?



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by sealing
 

I've never seen anybody levitate large stones with spinning magnets.

You've heard too many tall tales and you're a bit too gullible. This thread was mostly about real science until you brought that up.

I've been to coral castle and not seen what you're talking about. I've seen what Leedskalnin used to levitate the stones, and it had no magnets.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 10:44 PM
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This is pretty cool really. It does not take that much energy to spin a wheel with no resistance other than its own bearings. I'm thinking 1/4 HP should do it. It could be argued that if you did use a steel pipe then the magnets would provide resistance. I would say a very small amount, but not really if the pipe was circular and its diameter was the same as the diameter of the circle of magnets and centered over them. Now take some cooling fins and place on the pipe like you see on some conventional heaters. Leaving the bottom flat so the pipe may be placed as close as possible to the magnet wheel. Then build a fan into the magnet wheel to blow air by the fins. I believe the fan would be drawing the most power in this type of heater. Now what if that wheel was 3 feet in diameter and more magnets added to fill in the new circumference, the speed of the motor could be reduced drastically since the speed of the magnets would increase with the increased radius. Seems pretty efficient to me, but that all depends on what wattage of heat it would really produce. 1/4 HP motor = about 400 watts 1200 watts surge. Seems like the heat equivelant would be more than 400 watts. Passing electricity through a high resistance wire to make heat, the basic concept of most electric heaters, is highly inefficient to say the least. I must be wrong though because my brainwashing says we can't make heat any more efficient than we do now
Anyway what do you all think? Maybe we could incorporate one of those perpetual magnet motors and really make it "free energy" lol



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by LUXUS

Originally posted by RussianScientists

Originally posted by LUXUS
reply to post by RussianScientists
 


Yes it should heat up too but there are two factors to consider. Firstly that steel (probably cast Iron) top is large and so will act as a heat sink so at best it probably gets warm. Secondly it depends if the magnetic field on the bottom of the disc is shielded or reduced by either distance from the table or the magnetic housing material.




One thing you all are completely forgetting here, is that the magnets are supposed to react and/or create a form of mechanical work on ferrous material; not COPPER which is not FERROUS.


Wrong, induction will heat any material that is a good conductor of electricity but works most rapidly in paramagnetic materials such as iron/steel.


Actually you are wrong in your thinking. Induction stoves heat only steel pots and pans on top of the stove, you can put copper on them and nothing will happen, just as you can put your hand on top of them and you will feel no heat.

Your supposition still doesn't include the facts to my questions, but I'm expecting someone will sooner or latter have the facts. Too bad I got rid of my table router that looks exactly like that one, or I would run the tests myself.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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Originally posted by Nonameworks

This is pretty cool really. It does not take that much energy to spin a wheel with no resistance other than its own bearings.


Until you introduce a conductor.....Then we revert to Maxwell's equations.


I'm thinking 1/4 HP should do it. It could be argued that if you did use a steel pipe then the magnets would provide resistance. I would say a very small amount, but not really if the pipe was circular and its diameter was the same as the diameter of the circle of magnets and centered over them.

Refer to Maxwell's equations


Now take some cooling fins and place on the pipe like you see on some conventional heaters. Leaving the bottom flat so the pipe may be placed as close as possible to the magnet wheel. Then build a fan into the magnet wheel to blow air by the fins. I believe the fan would be drawing the most power in this type of heater.

Nope, it all depends on how much work the magnets are required to achieve.

Now what if that wheel was 3 feet in diameter and more magnets added to fill in the new circumference, the speed of the motor could be reduced drastically since the speed of the magnets would increase with the increased radius.

Increase the radius by 1/4 and you double the weight.


Seems pretty efficient to me, but that all depends on what wattage of heat it would really produce. 1/4 HP motor = about 400 watts 1200 watts surge.

1/4BHP motor will put out roughly 170W and surge at roughly twice that during start-up.

Seems like the heat equivelant would be more than 400 watts.

Nope, all you are doing is converting a higher source(of energy - electricity) to a lower source(kinetic energy - rotational motion) and back to a higher source(electricity) to generate heat.
Unfortunately, there is no way that this could be considered efficient unless a rotational force could be supplied cheap/free.........e.g. Windmill. Though even in this scenario, it is normally considered prudent to convert the rotational force to electricity to allow it to be stored for use in becalmed conditions.

Passing electricity through a high resistance wire to make heat, the basic concept of most electric heaters, is highly inefficient to say the least. I must be wrong though because my brainwashing says we can't make heat any more efficient than we do now


You would be hard pressed to generate power more efficiently than we do already.

Note - After I received an $1800 odd electricity bill for the last quarter, a friend suggested I consider using diesel generator instead.....I quickly did the sums for him and with diesel at $1.60ltr - here in Australia - I would be roughly double my electricity bill for the same power. Also note that - this does not include set-up costs nor ongoing maintenance for the system.

edit on 28/9/2012 by OccamAssassin because: (no reason given)
edit on 28/9/2012 by OccamAssassin because: (no reason given)
edit on 28/9/2012 by OccamAssassin because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:32 PM
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reply to post by RussianScientists
 



Actually you are wrong in your thinking. Induction stoves heat only steel pots and pans on top of the stove, you can put copper on them and nothing will happen, just as you can put your hand on top of them and you will feel no heat.

Actually, I think you have it wrong and I can prove it.

Take a long electrical extension lead(for the mains) and coil it up, leaving the plugs accessible. Connect something that has a relatively high current draw and turn it on.

If you log the temperature of the coil whilst drawing a decent current through it, you will notice the copper conductor raise in temp. Note that electric welders have to deal with this and as such they are given a "Duty Cycle" rating which is how much current can be drawn through the transformer before it overheats in ten minutes. My welder has a duty cycle of 60%, which means that I can use 60% of the total power continuously for ten minutes before the thermal safety switch trips. Use less than the 60% and it will last longer...use more and the welder will hit its maximum temperature sooner.

You can also prove it from a generator viewpoint. Run a generator for a few hours and put your hand on the generator casing(not the motor driving it)....hot isn't it.


Your supposition still doesn't include the facts to my questions, but I'm expecting someone will sooner or latter have the facts. Too bad I got rid of my table router that looks exactly like that one, or I would run the tests myself.


Embrace maths.


This can all be plotted and explained without having to build a test unit.
edit on 28/9/2012 by OccamAssassin because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 07:00 AM
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Originally posted by LUXUS


Rotating permanent magnets to induction heat metal, simple and beautiful!


Epic Fail. This guy is only using friction to heat the pipe.The magnets have Nothing to do with anything here. Copper has a very low melting point. You can even hear the pipe hitting the backside of the hub.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Epic Fail. This guy is only using friction to heat the pipe.The magnets have Nothing to do with anything here. Copper has a very low melting point. You can even hear the pipe hitting the backside of the hub.


Nope. You can hear him accidentally touch the rotor twice at about 2:55 - 3:05.

If you pay attention to the pitch the rotor makes while he is heating the pipe, it matches the pitch when the pipe is clear of the rotor.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 08:55 AM
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Now if he can figure out a way to attached this to a wind will and gear it up to reach the RPM's needed. Then run a length of copper pipe though the home, filled with water, or mineral oil and moved with a pump from the windmill. Now that would be almost free heat for a home. Why I say almost free? Parts arent free
.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Umm not really the softer copper pipe would of been ground down not glow a even red.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 10:24 AM
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Worth a star. I watched the other linked videos on You-tube addressing Tesla's other principals also



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by LUXUS
 


Literally?
The "coolest" thing I've ever seen was an open canister of liquid nitrogen in a room at the Dermatology Department at The University of Michigan Medical Center.

Actually?
I saw the space shuttle take of once, out of the corner of my eye from 50 miles away, back in the '80's, while standing at attention in chow line outside the mess-hall on base in Orlando. The base is long gone. I never finished Navy boot camp either. But that's another story entirely.

edit on 9/29/2012 by this_is_who_we_are because: clarity



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur
reply to post by sealing
 

I've never seen anybody levitate large stones with spinning magnets.

You've heard too many tall tales and you're a bit too gullible. This thread was mostly about real science until you brought that up.

I've been to coral castle and not seen what you're talking about. I've seen what Leedskalnin used to levitate the stones, and it had no magnets.



Whoa now... Wasn't me that said it. It was a thread I saw on ATS.
Did you read that part?

I don't believe in levitating stones. Again it was the thread.
You went WAY off on a tangent.
The thread was about science until I showed up? Wow...
Thanks man. You're the best.

And although I had nothing to do with the thread, in the thread it was said
the tool took it's design from the Seal of Solomon. It SPUN and had MAGNETS
Now you know everything, expert.
edit on 29-9-2012 by sealing because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-9-2012 by sealing because: punk

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 29-9-2012 by sealing because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-9-2012 by sealing because: edit





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