Now tell me thats not the coolest thing you ever seen!

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posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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Why not just lay copper pipe in the sun and pump water thru it?

Roof top solar water heaters are out of fashion?

The sun is free. It is limitless, clean and renewable...

So is water (well almost)...





posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by Mad dog
 


I was going to post the same thing.


Induction cooking uses induction heating to directly heat a cooking vessel, as opposed to using heat transfer from electrical coils or burning gas as with a traditional cooking stove. For nearly all models of induction cooktop, a cooking vessel must be made of a ferromagnetic metal, or placed on an interface disk which enables non-induction cookware to be used on induction cooking surfaces.


en.wikipedia.org...

It's actually a little embarrassing that when a currently marketed technology gets posted on ATS with a do it yourselfer showing off his hobby, and people make posts suggesting/insinuating he or someone similar might get "offed" by the gubbiment.

Hope Sears has some good security.



Just type "induction heating" in their product category. Someone must not have alerted the free energy police...
edit on 27-9-2012 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by LUXUS
reply to post by Soloro
 


No its not my vid but I think its the perfect way to heat water, you could take that big heap of junk you use to heat your house and replace it with something the size of a shoebox!


More "magical thinking";
Inductive heating of steel ( only works in ferrous metals) is a fairly common industrial process inductive bearing heaters are basically coils of heavy wire; the fluctuating magnetic field from the coils induces eddy currents in the metal creating heat through resistance.
edit on 27-9-2012 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)
edit on 27-9-2012 by 46ACE because: spelling



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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Hey OP, check out the video below from 03:43 to 10:59. It shows some similar very cool live experiments with others materials, as well as with magnets. Mind blowing.





posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:55 AM
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We could be taking for granted certain things in this video.

Obviously the copper pipe is being heated above the rotating magnets; but what is happening to the steel table top of the table router? Is the steel table top of the table router getting hot also? Or, is it still cool?

If the top of the steel table router top is not getting hot, then we are missing out on understanding what is really going on in this video.

Obviously the steel table top of the table router should be getting hot. The question is, what if it isn't getting hot?

I didn't see the steel table top turning red with heat, but did it heat up any? If so, how much?

There may be some cool things to be learned here that have not been noticed yet.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 04:29 AM
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reply to post by boncho
 



Hope Sears has some good security.





On topic.....The engineer/machinist in the video has just machined the main rotor for an induction forge. Cool, yes, but nothing out of the ordinary. These are in use around the world in engineering shops and smelts.

The larger ones are the size of houses and can draw megawatts over the space of a few hours.

The ones that we can see in the OP's video look like the heating plates/inductors for a pouring crucible.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 04:52 AM
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reply to post by LUXUS
 


you cry at the post i made saying "not sure what you could do with such a tech" yet the only suggestion has been to make a heater out of it........

have YOU made any measurments or calculations to indicate that this is indeed a more viable method of heat production then the other options already in use in so many homes? i see nothing but speculation and guess on your part and every poster in that regard, can you realy just look at this and say to yourself "it would probably cost less then the alternatives we already have in place" and then as you put it 'cry and leave the planet' just cause someone is skeptical of you speculation without calculation?
edit on 9/28/12 by pryingopen3rdeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 05:06 AM
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reply to post by flexy123
 


Ok your wrong and I will tell you why, your furnace uses gas or oil to heat the water AND you need to have a water pump to circulate that hot water through the heating loop. Now if you used this idea the motor driving the disc could both circulate and heat the water so more efficient...no not free but way more efficient!
edit on 28-9-2012 by LUXUS because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 05:16 AM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by Phage
 

Phage's example is real. Notice the temperature is slowly climbing.

Inefficient at best. You can get as warm curling up with the motor behind the board that is turning the Cu disc.

At least this guy doesn't say "free heat". Nor is he pressing a piece of hand held pipe against a spinning wheel.


Its the same guy, let me enplane...someone ripped his video and retitled it.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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Originally posted by 46ACE

Originally posted by LUXUS
reply to post by Soloro
 


No its not my vid but I think its the perfect way to heat water, you could take that big heap of junk you use to heat your house and replace it with something the size of a shoebox!


More "magical thinking";
Inductive heating of steel ( only works in ferrous metals) is a fairly common industrial process inductive bearing heaters are basically coils of heavy wire; the fluctuating magnetic field from the coils induces eddy currents in the metal creating heat through resistance.
edit on 27-9-2012 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)
edit on 27-9-2012 by 46ACE because: spelling


Really? was that copper I seen him heating and is copper a ferrous metal?

And thanks for telling me what an induction furnace is, I have one in my garage but its always nice to be reminded what its for



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 05:49 AM
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reply to post by RussianScientists
 


Yes it should heat up too but there are two factors to consider. Firstly that steel (probably cast Iron) top is large and so will act as a heat sink so at best it probably gets warm. Secondly it depends if the magnetic field on the bottom of the disc is shielded or reduced by either distance from the table or the magnetic housing material.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 05:52 AM
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Originally posted by OccamAssassin
reply to post by boncho
 



Hope Sears has some good security.





On topic.....The engineer/machinist in the video has just machined the main rotor for an induction forge. Cool, yes, but nothing out of the ordinary. These are in use around the world in engineering shops and smelts.

The larger ones are the size of houses and can draw megawatts over the space of a few hours.

The ones that we can see in the OP's video look like the heating plates/inductors for a pouring crucible.



Wrong! induction heaters never use rotating magnets, they do it by alternating an electric current through a copper tube through which coolant is pumped.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 06:16 AM
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reply to post by LUXUS
 



Wrong! induction heaters never use rotating magnets, they do it by alternating an electric current through a copper tube through which coolant is pumped.


I suppose that the fact that I'm an engineer and have made induction forges(usually portable/mobile units) exactly like this doesn't count.

Yes, there are different types of methods of achieving an oscillating magnetic field for the purposes of heating a ferrite conductor.

Running coolant through a copper-alloy is just one method of induction forging and it is by no means the only method. It is far more common just to use a copper-alloy heating element and forgo the coolant altogether - if you really want to be anal.

Regardless, my post was wrt the rotor in the OP ......Just because you have never seen an induction forge set up in this fashion, does not mean that they do not exist.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 06:30 AM
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This is actually pretty good.

If we can find a way to reduce the power consumption this could actually do a lot for developing countries.

We really need someone to test this with far lower energy use, find the benchmark (speed or length of exposure) and then work on reducing that to a practical level.

With some good development this could actually be reduced to a wind-up operation if the speed could be reduced far enough.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:17 AM
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Also microwaves are in this same principle, a high frequency changing magnetic field which produces the warmth in the food.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:51 AM
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Originally posted by OccamAssassin
reply to post by LUXUS
 



Wrong! induction heaters never use rotating magnets, they do it by alternating an electric current through a copper tube through which coolant is pumped.


I suppose that the fact that I'm an engineer and have made induction forges(usually portable/mobile units) exactly like this doesn't count.

Yes, there are different types of methods of achieving an oscillating magnetic field for the purposes of heating a ferrite conductor.

Running coolant through a copper-alloy is just one method of induction forging and it is by no means the only method. It is far more common just to use a copper-alloy heating element and forgo the coolant altogether - if you really want to be anal.

Regardless, my post was wrt the rotor in the OP ......Just because you have never seen an induction forge set up in this fashion, does not mean that they do not exist.




Thing is I'm an Engineer too and no I never seen an Induction furnace that used rotating magnets. They all use copper coils with coolant pumped through them and the very old ones used a rotating commutator switch to generate the high frequency ( the days before power transistor switching) but never have I seen one that actually used rotating permanent magnets!
edit on 28-9-2012 by LUXUS because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 08:07 AM
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Originally posted by LUXUS
reply to post by RussianScientists
 


Yes it should heat up too but there are two factors to consider. Firstly that steel (probably cast Iron) top is large and so will act as a heat sink so at best it probably gets warm. Secondly it depends if the magnetic field on the bottom of the disc is shielded or reduced by either distance from the table or the magnetic housing material.


You haven't answered my questions with "ANY" facts, just suppositions and knowledge that most of us are already aware of. We need someone with exact answers to my questions, not supposition.
edit on 28-9-2012 by RussianScientists because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 08:18 AM
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Just for fun I calculated that a disc having 18,300 3mm dia neodymium magnets mounted on a disc with a diameter of 17.47 meters and spun at 50,000 rpm would actually microwave water



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by LUXUS
Just for fun I calculated that a disc having 18,300 3mm dia neodymium magnets mounted on a disc with a diameter of 17.47 meters and spun at 50,000 rpm would actually microwave water


lol


Just to add ....the outer edge is travelling at 718,977Km/h.....safety goggles are optional.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:27 AM
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Originally posted by LUXUS
reply to post by RussianScientists
 


Yes it should heat up too but there are two factors to consider. Firstly that steel (probably cast Iron) top is large and so will act as a heat sink so at best it probably gets warm. Secondly it depends if the magnetic field on the bottom of the disc is shielded or reduced by either distance from the table or the magnetic housing material.


Here you are again my friend Luxus, giving me supposition as to what occurs, but not actual facts.

Someone needs to bring out an actual real life experience of the truth, not supposition.

One thing you all are completely forgetting here, is that the magnets are supposed to react and/or create a form of mechanical work on ferrous material; not COPPER which is not FERROUS.

I'm wondering if the ferrous material heated up just as the non-ferrous material heated up.





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