The Sumerian 'Flood-Storm' weapon.

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posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 05:36 AM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 


In my uneducated opinion, it sounds like a meteor shower coming out of Scorpio. Then again, that's just my uneducated opinion ....

Seraph




posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by Kantzveldt



What would you say this version of Ninirta holding 'storm'-weapon' looks like...?














Haarp.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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There are actually a considerable number of anomalous findings around the world (and especially in the ancient Mideast and India) that could possibly be evidence of nuclear explosions in the past... or could possibly have other explanations. All you have to do is search in Google for phrases like "euphrates valley fused green glass" or "nuclear explosions in prehistory."

The problem is the results you find tend to fall into two camps:

1. Most links are to sites that automatically believe anything without any definite evidence one way or another. And most are really just repeating what other similar sites say without any fact checking. They automatically assume that the anomalous findings are evidence of ancient nuclear wars, ancient astronauts, etc. Some of the evidence they automatically accept seems to have been largely debunked, but not all of it.

2. Sites that automatically disbelieve the possibility of ancient nuclear wars regardless of the many interesting anomalous findings. These sites are really just as biased as the other type. Their viewpoint is based mostly on the assumption that there has never been a previous advanced civilization, ancient astronauts, etc. They try to explain all of the anomalous findings as the result of meteor strikes, lightning strikes, naturally occurring nuclear reactions, modern radioactive contamination, etc. In some cases, they are probably right. But often their explanations do not really fit the given anomaly.

The truth is most likely somewhere in between. While some of the anomalous findings may have mundane explanations, not all are so easily dismissed. When you combine the ancient stories with the known anomalies, there seems to me to be enough evidence that anyone with an open mind would find it all pretty interesting and worthy of further investigation.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by ikonoklast
 


This kind of post is a big part of why I love ATS. It's nice to see logic and objectivity instead of blind acceptance of one stance or another.



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 03:13 AM
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reply to post by ikonoklast
 



Good points...texts like this require explanation.




Ninurta went to battle, with one step (?) he covered a league, he was an alarming storm, and rode on the eight winds towards the rebel lands. His arms grasped the lance. The mace snarled at the mountains, the club began to devour all the enemy. He fitted the evil wind and the sirocco on a pole (?), he placed the quiver on its hook (?). An enormous hurricane, irresistible, went before the hero, stirred up the dust, caused the dust to settle, levelled high and low, filled the holes. It caused a rain of coals and flaming fires; the fire consumed men. It overturned tall trees by their trunks, reducing the forests to heaps, Earth put her hands on her heart and cried harrowingly; the Tigris was muddied, disturbed, cloudy, stirred up. He hurried to battle on the boat Ma-kar-nunta-ea; the people there did not know where to turn, they bumped into (?) the walls. The birds there tried to lift their heads to fly away, but their wings trailed on the ground. The storm flooded out the fish there in the subterranean waters, their mouths snapped at the air. It reduced the animals of the open country to firewood, roasting them like locusts. It was a deluge rising and disastrously ruining the mountains.



That's a perfect description of the effects of nuclear strike.

edit on 8-9-2012 by Kantzveldt because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 11:28 AM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Thank you, Byrd, I will do so.

I am always looking to further my knowledge.

BT



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


I could agree with that, total war, because of the fact of what happens after an army goes through a country. An absolute possibility as well, I retract part of my first statement.
edit on 9-9-2012 by NoJoker13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 10:00 PM
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That sounds like a very impressive weapon. One which could bring great pain and suffering. I am not an expert on Sumerian culture or Sumerian weapons of war. I do know they used a lot of metaphors in their writings in order to express things which were very complex.

Are there any records of other societies mentioning this weapon of the Sumerians? If other cultures and societies mentioned the Sumerians having or using this weapon it would help in understanding exactly what this weapon was.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 05:36 AM
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reply to post by freedomwv
 




The best case for corroboration would be the Sodom and Gommorah tale of four of the five cities of the plain being destroyed,



Strabo states that locals living near Moasada (as opposed to Masada) say that "there were once thirteen inhabited cities in that region of which Sodom was the metropolis". Strabo identifies a limestone and salt hill at the south western tip of the Dead Sea, and Kharbet Usdum ruins nearby as the site of biblical Sodom.[7]

Archibald Sayce translated an Akkadian poem describing cities that were destroyed in a rain of fire, written from the view of a person who escaped the destruction; the names of the cities are not given.[8] However, Sayce later mentions that the story more closely resembles the doom of Sennacherib's host.[9]

In 1976 Giovanni Pettinato claimed that a cuneiform tablet that had been found in the newly discovered library at Ebla contained the names of all five of the cities of the plain (Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim, and Bela), listed in the same order as in Genesis


Another possible candidate for Sodom is the Tall el-Hammam dig site which began in 2006 under the direction of Steven Collins. Tall el-Hammam is located in the southern Jordan river valley approximately 14 kilometers Northeast of the Dead Sea, and seemingly fitting the Bible descriptions of the lands of Sodom. The ongoing dig is a result of joint cooperation between Trinity South Western University and the Department of Antiquities of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.[17] The tall proper is 36 hectares while the footprint size of general settlement extends beyond this well over 40 hectares. Due to the size this puts Tall el-Hammam as one of the largest Bronze sites that has been discovered in Jordan. Analysis of the findings indicates that the site was occupied from the Chalcolithic period on up the Iron Age (however there may likely be period gaps as well, along with evidences of glazed artifacts - such as pottery and rocks, and destruction)




en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by NoJoker13
 


It seems more likely to me, that is all. I really think the Sumerian accounts are very heavy on allegory and on metaphor. When we consider what they did actually have in Sumerian times, a weapon of this type just seems an impossible jump in technology. Whilst the Sumerians were busy perfecting basic warfare tactics and siege abilities, i just do not see how how they also possessed a weapon of this magnitude.

However, that is why i love Kantzveldt's (sorry if spelled wrong) threads. Always presents info in a very interesting way that encourages debate.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 06:41 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 



Thanks, just to point out i don't think there's any question of the Sumerians themselves having such a weapon, it is only described as belonging to the Anuna, Ninurta/Ningirsu, in the same sense that the destruction of the cities of the plains was only attributed to the Angels.


Apart from the similarity with the tales from the Western neighbours of Sumeria, it might be worth considering how such stories transmitted across the greater Dravidian region Eastward, from Aratta/Jiroft and Elam in Iran, across to Harrapan regions in Pakistan, and how these could have given rise to similar accounts in the Vedic tradition.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 07:46 AM
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www.smith.edu...

Ancient Inventions
by Peter James, Nick Thorpe
* The ancient Greeks used an early form of computer.
* Plastic surgery was being performed in India by the first century B.C.

www.goodreads.com...
fascinating- B.C. Brain surgery, anasthesia, magnets, batteries, magnifying glasses.

And I remember something about lightning rods at/on a temple (in greece)?

An ancient WMD? Why not?



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 


Now we got another culture mentioning it and evidence of some massive destruction by something very power in their time, this `flood-storm` weapon is looking to have more credence.

I am speculating at this point but this flood weapon might be some kind of multi-firing flame arrow weapon. Considering the technology they most likely had access to at the time arrows could be involved.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:47 AM
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Originally posted by Kantzveldt
reply to post by ancientthunder
 



The date for this conflict would be in the 3rd millenia BC regarding the city of Lagash. Interesting regarding the Griffin, in that the sacred bird of Lagash and Ninurta was the Anzu bird, half lion and eagle.




Whats interesting is that the Anzu bird, oldest example found at Lagash, is still in use today on crests and national flags and the like.......and was so used long before the Anzu was found at Lagash. BeBeep.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 


Well Ill tell ya, these old dudes liked to run the mouth about how THEY were the powers behind storms and the like when in reality such events were not controled by them. One of the Old Testement prophets mocking asked "which of the vanitites of the heathen can make it rain"? Another challenged the "rain makers" of baal to a weather dule of sorts.....and mocked them baal boys. Its high cotton in the world of gods and prophets to be on the team of the real weather God.....and the pagans loved to make such big claims.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 


Maybe this is what it looked like





posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 


I embarrass myself mostly with this, but Bilks

awesome looking pic !

presents me with the opportunity to say OP rocks, for presenting this thread topic in grand fashion. I have something to add believe it or not and at mine own risk of course. Whatever it is being depicted on the copper seal/stele/captured moment in human history ? Seems very much to me, to be something that was present in the sky at the time this captured moment was passing. It seems to say, look at what was in the sky, when this, that, or what not, were going on.

That system or weapon or nat-phenomena again whatever it is ? Needs a lot of attention, it begs then demands and I'm sure would satisfy. If we could only dig up that pictured puzzle piece that said this was exactly that.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by Indellkoffer
 



Originally posted by Indellkoffer

Originally posted by Kantzveldt
reply to post by BearTruth
 


It's surprising that Sitchin seems to have been unaware of these texts describing the flood-storm weapon, the Heavenly weapon of the Anuna, as far as i'm aware.


He was a reporter and not an archaeologist or anthropologist who could read the texts.

Wikipedia says the thing is a mace, and it does sound like all the other maces of the deities (endowed with inhuman powers.) I don't think there's any evidence these gods or weapons were actually real -- something like that would leave scars on the landscape worse than an atomic bomb. You'd see lava glass everywhere that there weren't volcanoes.


*hu-hum* He was a Journalist, you know, like Hunter Thompson. The fact that he didn't learn his ability to translate Sumerian cuneiform from an accredited school is not a fair way to damn his work. Personally, with all the BS I know is taught in textbook ancient history/archeology independent research seems to be the best way to go about it. Theres only about a handful of such schools present to this day where you can learn to read Sumerian and even the University of PA's Sumerian dictionary is not complete.

You have to understand, there were not many places one could just go and attend school to learn how to read Sumerian cuneiform in the early 70's.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by randyvs
reply to post by Bilk22
 


I embarrass myself mostly with this, but Bilks

awesome looking pic !

presents me with the opportunity to say OP rocks, for presenting this thread topic in grand fashion. I have something to add believe it or not and at mine own risk of course. Whatever it is being depicted on the copper seal/stele/captured moment in human history ? Seems very much to me, to be something that was present in the sky at the time this captured moment was passing. It seems to say, look at what was in the sky, when this, that, or what not, were going on.

That system or weapon or nat-phenomena again whatever it is ? Needs a lot of attention, it begs then demands and I'm sure would satisfy. If we could only dig up that pictured puzzle piece that said this was exactly that.

Well that's the ship from the movie 1Anunnaki, which allegedly was prevented from being brought to public.
Sort of fits the description in the OP.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by freedomwv
 



Multi-directional firing might be what is represented in the illustrations, again though i don't see any evidence for the Sumerians having had such a weapon themselves, it is only ever seen and described in conjunction with Ninurta.








Like i said it's worth considering transmission of this tradition Eastward through Dravidian Elam in Iran, into Harappan India. This is a piece from central Iran that intrigued me, around 2nd millenium BC in date.







It intrigued because it suggested itself as a precursor for the iconography of Shiva, Destroyer of worlds...








reply to post by Logarock
 




I don't see rain mentioned though, it is destruction by fire that envelops the land like a flood.




reply to post by Bilk22
 



Yes that corresponds with the literary descriptions, shaped like a winged macehead.









edit on 10-9-2012 by Kantzveldt because: (no reason given)
edit on 10-9-2012 by Kantzveldt because: (no reason given)





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