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Question about planetary object close to sun

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posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by cloaked4u
 

Orion is in the east before dawn. To the left (north) Venus is very bright since it first started appearing as the morning star since June. It was at its brightest in July but since it is rising earlier and earlier it may seem to be brighter because the sky is darker.

Sirius would be more "below" Orion before dawn.


It was to the left and a bit down off of orion before the sun came up. very,very,very bright and big. So from what everyone says it matches sirus. Like i said, in the past 3 months it looks like it's getting bigger.








posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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reply to post by cloaked4u
 


It was to the left and a bit down off of orion before the sun came up. very,very,very bright and big. So from what everyone says it matches sirus. Like i said, in the past 3 months it looks like it's getting bigger.


Everyone says?
Sirius is not to the left of Orion at dawn. Venus is. It's not getting bigger but the sky is darker because it's rising earlier. Does it look something like this? Do you see Venus in addition to this other bright thing that can't be Venus?



edit on 9/3/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by thesmokingman
 


And you believe what NASA says??
You need to get your head examined!



posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 11:40 PM
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If something that big, was that close, it would be pretty obvious to almost every other "avid" astronomer on the planet and word would travel fast.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 12:28 AM
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I about fell out of my chair when I read the OP.



Maybe there is a scientific explanation. Gee maybe that's why I asked? Instead I'm getting ridiculed with childish insults and nothing intellectual said.


First of all:

Can I put 10 pairs of sunglasses together to view the sun? No. You’re risking temporary or permanent damage to your eye. Only two kinds of commercially available vision filters are safe – solar filters sold at science museums and planetariums or a No. 14 welder’s glass. These filters block all but 0.003% of visible light, and also protect your eyes from harmful invisible infrared light.


What you are seeing are overloaded cones in your eyes. Please, do not view the sun like that, it is VERY dangerous to your eyesight.


Never view the Sun directly with the naked eye or with any unfiltered optical device, such as binoculars or a telescope!


As an amateur astronomer, (there are a lot of us here, such as myself) you should realize how important your vision actually is.

Try this, Instead:





If you're thinking of viewing the Sun, your first concern should always be eye safety. Serious eye damage can result from even a brief glimpse of our star. One safe way to observe sunspots or eclipses is to project an image of the Sun through a telescope or binoculars onto a white screen -- paper plates, walls and sidewalks all work nicely. If you're using a telescope, be sure that any small finder telescope is capped. If you're using binoculars, keep the cover on one of the two tubes. Never look through a telescope or binoculars to point them at the Sun -- partial or total blindness will almost surely result.


Or, of course, buy the proper filter for your telescope. The above method works quite well, and will keep your eyesight safe!



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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Originally posted by haven123
you know lense flare has nothing to do with the clenlines of the lense.
if you were a avid astronamer you wouldnt be asking thing like this on here
edit on 3-9-2012 by haven123 because: (no reason given)

Here we go again........
Did you actually go outside and look for the object before you decided to insult and debunk the OP?
Somewhere on the planet, by process of elimination, we should theoretically be able to identify the worlds BEST astronomer. This person would not be able to tell you what, if anything, lurks behind the Sun. Every day there are hundreds of new discoveries and areas that are empty today will contain objects tomorrow.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 04:28 AM
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He didn't need to go outside and have a look. Common sense tells us that there is no large unknown planet near the Sun, because its gravitational field would have disturbed the orbits of the known planets a long time ago.
edit on 4-9-2012 by Mogget because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 05:46 AM
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reply to post by Enemyc0mbatant
 


It's probably a reflection of your eye on one of the many lenses you are looking through. Failing that, you or your girlfriend left a 'sticker' on one of the lenses.


If you believe it's Nibiru, then may I suggest you go on a spending spree.


st.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 06:43 AM
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reply to post by Thebel
 


Surely if its that close to the sun, The suns heat would melt it or destroy it unless it was made by beings who don't adhere to the same scientific laws as we do.
Maybe they also have the knowledge to stop any of those drastic planetary effects you speak of.
I don't know why we try to use the laws that govern us on beings that could be millions of years advanced then us.
Our science is only scratching the surface in regards to knowledge of the Universe we live, maybe they're not even physical beings at all. maybe they are energy beings and just having a good feed.
Think of the strangest sci fi scenario you can and you'd still be miles from the truth.
They say the truth is stranger than fiction.l



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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Did you not take a pic..? It would have been nice to see what you saw. Such posts would make better discussion material, if supported by some images from a camera. I guess, if it was visible with naked eye(+eye ware), it could easily be captured via a good camera (with filters/eye-shade!!!).



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:28 AM
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Originally posted by thesmokingman
reply to post by Enemyc0mbatant
 


Hey, its not my fault niburu is not a real planet. An avid astronomer would know this is all I am saying.... and your attacks are not appreciated.

Stories about the fictional planet Nibiru and predictions of doomsday in December 2012 have blossomed on the Internet.

It clearly states FICTIONAL. You my friend are the one LOST.
astrobiology.nasa.gov...
edit on 3-9-2012 by thesmokingman because: (no reason given)


And YOU actually believe NASA.

YOU, my friend, are the one who is lost.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by s0l4rn1ghtm4r3
 


Who do you listen to on these matters then?

Since you don't believe what NASA says, does this make the opposite of what they say true?

For example, nubiru must be real because NASA says it isn't?


edit on 4-9-2012 by AlphaHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by AlphaHawk
reply to post by s0l4rn1ghtm4r3
 


Who do you listen to on these matters then?

Since you don't believe what NASA says, does this make the opposite of what they say true?

For example, nubiru must be real because NASA says it isn't?


edit on 4-9-2012 by AlphaHawk because: (no reason given)



This reminds me of the all too-true saying, " Just because I'm wrong, doesn't make you right." However, this applies to the debunkers of this thread and others like it. We know so little about our universe which is so vast. I truely believe If another planet were lurking in our area, the disruption of our solar system would be so great, that no one could dismiss it's presence. THAT is my convincing answer to my own question....so simple to understand.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 09:12 AM
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You are taking a big risk looking at the sun through multiple sun glasses...you can put on six pairs of sunglasses and still not get the required protection and cheap sunglasses may be \ are even be worse:

Here is something i learned a long time ago:


When you buy a pair of cheap sunglasses, you often give up all of these benefits and can even make things worse. For example, if your sunglasses offer no UV protection, you increase your exposure to UV rays. The cheap sunglasses block some of the light, causing your iris to open to allow more light in. This lets in more of the UV light as well, increasing the damage UV light can cause to the retina.


science.howstuffworks.com...

Basically NEVER look at the sun with sunglasses. I see on the internet people saying stuff like "i used to be able to look at the sun"...yes, i have actually seen that posted on another site. I am over 40 and cannot ever remember looking at the sun without being blinded.

Furthermore, if something was next to the sun then everyone would know by no. Not to mention anything that looks "next" to the sun can be millions of miles away.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 09:17 AM
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Originally posted by Enemyc0mbatant
So today beautiful day laying in our pool and I decided to take my sun glasses, my girlfriends sunglasses and 2 other pairs to take a look at a planetary looking object next to the sun. Without all these sun glasses you wouldn't be able to see it.

So I decided to check my star walk app to see if maybe its the moon... It's not. It's also too big to be a planet such as Venus or mercury.

So the question I pose is, what the hell is it? Is it Niburu?

Also this is a dead serious question so if you have nothing good to say please move along as I am posing a serious question. I am an avid astronomer so I know a little about what I am talking about.

I also know it is not a lens flare as I cleaned all glasses to make sure.
edit on 3-9-2012 by Enemyc0mbatant because: (no reason given)


A flare due to the layers of glass SIMPLE!



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 09:44 AM
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I think the fact that, you used so many sunglasses, might answer your Question as to what it is?? Its most likely the sun, mirrored by the concave reflections of your multiple sunglasses. If you really want to get a good look, buy a cheap Welding helmet, much safer, and you won't be looking through 4 different lenses, which could create mirrored reflections of an object. Personally I have looked at the sun many times and the only thing I see is a big fire ball, the sun. pretty cool though



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by s0l4rn1ghtm4r3
And YOU actually believe NASA.

YOU, my friend, are the one who is lost.


Hmmm. So Europa really DOESN'T have a huge ocean under its ice, Titan DOESN'T have liquid methane lakes that potentially could harbor life, and Mars never really did have oceans of water in the past...

...Plus, does that mean there ISN'T really a salt water ocean under the crust of Enceladus, or comets really DON'T contain the organic building blocks of life, or maybe there really are NOT potentially thousands (millions?) of earth-like rocky planets out there in our own galaxy?

I mean, NASA has told us these things, so I suppose I shouldn't believe any of it?



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by AlphaHawk
 


Absolutely not. I don't base my facts on what NASA says does or doesn't exist, and in some cases, they do report the truth and it is there in simple math. However, I know that they would not be permitted to tell us of such an event, that could cause global extinction. This news wouldn't be reported until only days before the event, because otherwise we would have absolute panic.

All I'm saying is you can't take every word that NASA has to say to heart, you have to second guess everything and everyone, thus, allowing yourself to come to a real educated conclusion.
edit on 9/4/12 by s0l4rn1ghtm4r3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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Originally posted by s0l4rn1ghtm4r3
reply to post by AlphaHawk
 


Absolutely not. I don't base my facts on what NASA says does or doesn't exist, and in some cases, they do report the truth and it is there in simple math...

In this case there IS math that could be done (albeit not "simple math") that tells us there cannot be an object large enough and/or close enough to Earth to be seen in daylight without using a telescope. If there was such an object, the orbits of the planets would be thrown off in such a manner that it would be quite obvious that something was wrong.



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by Thebel
If you are astronomer, you should know that if there is huge object next to Sun, it would affect every planet. Mercury would go crazy, spinning on random orbits, maybe hitting the Sun or Nibiru. Venus would do the same. Effects on Earth would be pretty much same. If object has just arrived, things would go crazy, but if it has been there for a long time, things would have been stabilized. If its very near to our Sun, they would drag themselves closer and closer. Gravity would make Sun look like disc, depending on size of "Nibiru". Finally Sun would swallow whole Nibiru, causing it to expand. We would get fried.

And yes, lens flare has nothing to do with how clean lense is.
edit on 3-9-2012 by Thebel because: (no reason given)


Unless , it is just Large, but doesn't have much mass or isn't dense. Then it wouldn't have that big of an influence at all.


EX: Something 2X the size of earth, but with the Mass of the Moon.



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