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If Curiosity had nano quadrotors or something like would this enhance ROVER MINERAL/VIDEO data, ?

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posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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If Curiosity had nano quadrotors like shown in OP or nano drillers, would data collection of MARS or other planets be easier? So a ROVER would drop in and once it made it to safe descent it releases many nano quadrotors or drills if not swimmers to do sky/topographic or land/liquid observations. They nano quadrotors would go and return and are charged from above solar panels on them as well as main battery of rover. The liquid or drillers would remain intact gathering data until obtained if thats the case.

Or would it not be a good idea if say there is a native species there unfamiliar with EA*RTH activities thinking they are being invaded, who COULD reach EA*RTH?









defensetech.org...

I think its a good idea to incorporate uav into future rovers, how bout you and if you have any other potential details to add to future projects add here. I make this thread incase the idea hasnt been shared yet.

NAMASTE*******

edit on 8/7/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Gathering data by, placing cameras and monitors on the quad rotors and drills/swimmers.



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


In the future it might be an option. Just remember that things like these are highly experimental, and break down a lot. Technology like that doesn't normally go out into space, because you can't just go up there and fix things easily. Ever wondered why the computers in the spacecraft are so old? Because there are no hidden surprises in them (well, other things like radiation resistance,, etc too), but you don't really want some very experimental technology in space, do you? You first need to sort out everything here, make sure all the bearings, rotors, motors, etc, won't seize on the journey out there, etc......



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
but you don't really want some very experimental technology in space, do you? You first need to sort out everything here, make sure all the bearings, rotors, motors, etc, won't seize on the journey out there, etc......


I agree I just felt there were some more advanced versions sitting in a base somewhere. But yes test first before probing another planet always.



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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Mars' atmosphere is too thin to realistically allow any sort of powered flight within it. The energy requirements for turning the rotors fast enough to provide enough lift (even taking into account the gravitational differential) would be too inefficient compared to just sending a rover. You would also have to develop an extremely complex autonomous navigational software, equip it with multiple high resolution cameras, radar and so forth which would result in a heavier load and an even higher energy requirement.

Charging them would also be a problem. The idea of blimps has been mooted for the exploration of Venus but that is still a while off yet.
edit on 7-8-2012 by NoExpert because: Spelling



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:00 PM
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I still can see in my mind a fleet of ornithopters exploring Mars


www.ornithopter.org...



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by NoExpert
 


Ok that makes a lot of sense, the atmosphere differences would call for the need better flight crafts and arrangements of the components to make a lighter craft able to lift on Mars.
No expert I appreciate your input. Hmm I guess I am relating EA*RTH to MARS too much in relation to atmosphere w.o acknowledging they have different make ups in different regions. Do you think sending drillers or swimmers near liquid areas would help?


Originally posted by Hellhound604
I still can see in my mind a fleet of ornithopters exploring Mars


www.ornithopter.org...
Nice

edit on 8/7/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


Thanks, I did like the idea, it's what prompted me to sign up in fact. It'd be an option on planets or moons with thick atmospheres, we could one day see autonomous copters mapping the methane lakes of Titan.



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:09 PM
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Originally posted by NoExpert
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


Thanks, I did like the idea, it's what prompted me to sign up in fact. It'd be an option on planets or moons with thick atmospheres, we could one day see autonomous copters mapping the methane lakes of Titan.


You are welcome, it would be nice to see Titan sparkle lakes shining yet so volatile. I wonder though to add would it be possible to place atmospheric condition outputs on the little craft in shape of a gas chamber that would in turn release a gas or something to thicken the area or atmosphere around a drone to mimic EA*RTH atmosphere. So you would have a gas or mist emitted somehow out or around them to allow them to fly. I know that's a lot of engineering but just putting that out there as well. Again thanks for guiding the mind



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:15 PM
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So thus far it takes much more engineer upgrading to be able to use EA*RTH based flying crafts on MARS makes sense. The idea I felt would bring more close ups of the terrain closer then MRO and higher elevated then ROVER. So maybe 1 day someone in the DARPA or DOD will be able to make it happen..

blimps
balloons
or magnetic flying devices carried with magnetic link from above flying device like MRO but soley based on moving these crafts from space with magnets
. So somehting orbits while magnatised pulling or holding them as it flys from space.
edit on 8/7/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
You are welcome, it would be nice to see Titan sparkle lakes shining yet so volatile. I wonder though to add would it be possible to place atmospheric condition outputs on the little craft in shape of a gas chamber that would in turn release a gas or something to thicken the area or atmosphere around a drone to mimic EA*RTH atmosphere. So you would have a gas or mist emitted somehow out or around them to allow them to fly. I know that's a lot of engineering but just putting that out there as well. Again thanks for guiding the mind




Enclosing the rotors in a pressurised chamber would essentially negate the thrust they produce as it would all be exerted on the bottom of the chamber, providing no actual lift. To release gas around the craft outside it's technically possible but it wouldn't make much sense to do it, diffusion would very quickly equalise any pressure differentials.



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by NoExpert
 


I more less seen a gas ejected from base of QR that is mist like as it leaks or is released then it flows around rotor mixing with MARS air continous. It would need to be refilled so maybe uav flights minimal until terraforming tech can be used to gather materials from MARS air to make up there. this mist would follow craft somewhat but all rotors ect not closed in just forming temp atmosphere around QDs so they fly like EA*RTH based. As you can see NoExpert I have hard time accepting anything is impossible lol but I got you drift thus far and its a good point made. diffusion neutralizer needed like heat emitter or somehting maybe elertrical like static field blocker. Not sure for I am not a Scientist of EA*RTH.
edit on 8/7/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
reply to post by NoExpert
 


Do you think sending drillers or swimmers near liquid areas would help?

I really do like the copter-swarm idea ~ bummer that the thin atmosphere and power requirements are such insurmountable impediments right now. Another idea I've heard is for swarms of ground 'hoppers' that could explore areas inaccessible to rovers such as caves and gullies. ... blimps? hellyeah! why not? ... there are also ideas for a glider that would remain airborne throughout its mission ...

Unfortunately, we don't 'know' of any liquid on Mars right now. The only places on Mars where liquid water can exist, even in a meta-stable state, is at the bottom of Hellas Basin or the bottom of Vallis Marinaris where atmospheric pressure is barely high enough. There is speculation that short-lived salty liquid films can reach the surface, and speculation of subsurface water in places, but no evidence yet ...



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by excentryk

Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
reply to post by NoExpert
 


Do you think sending drillers or swimmers near liquid areas would help?

I really do like the copter-swarm idea ~ bummer that the thin atmosphere and power requirements are such insurmountable impediments right now. Another idea I've heard is for swarms of ground 'hoppers' that could explore areas inaccessible to rovers such as caves and gullies. ... blimps? hellyeah! why not? ... there are also ideas for a glider that would remain airborne throughout its mission ...

Unfortunately, we don't 'know' of any liquid on Mars right now. The only places on Mars where liquid water can exist, even in a meta-stable state, is at the bottom of Hellas Basin or the bottom of Vallis Marinaris where atmospheric pressure is barely high enough. There is speculation that short-lived salty liquid films can reach the surface, and speculation of subsurface water in places, but no evidence yet ...


Thanks I considered there may not be liquids above ground but inside in pockets 1 wondered, that why the drillers would be needed to find liquid first. It just seems there is no way to get good topographic views of the terrain other then released MRO photos. I want to see what many want to see the real life pics so I thoght of this OP. The glider you mentioned would work well with the magnetic orbiter system carrying them around the skies of MARS so 1 will keep an eye out for them, if they get shared lol. Either way the Curiosity land was a good feeling overall and it shows the intelligence of EA*RTH based technologies advancing in this CYCLE which I like to see. If its a fake like many in other threads have posted then fooled me ONCE lol but for now 1 will enjoy knowing EA*RTH is progressing in this CYCLE of technology. Take care excentryk



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


not to knock curiosity and its accomplishments
but maybe the next planetary probe they should hire you

i mean seriously
over 2 billion dollars and this is what they send:


Hardware

At the heart of Curiosity there is, of course, a computer. In this case the Mars rover is powered by a RAD750, a single-board computer (motherboard, RAM, ROM, and CPU) produced by BAE. The RAD750 has been on the market for more than 10 years, and it’s currently one of the most popular on-board computers for spacecraft. In Curiosity’s case, the CPU is a PowerPC 750 (PowerPC G3 in Mac nomenclature) clocked at around 200MHz — which might seem slow, but it’s still hundreds of times faster than, say, the Apollo Guidance Computer used in the first Moon landings. Also on the motherboard are 256MB of DRAM, and 2GB of flash storage — which will be used to store video and scientific data before transmission to Earth.
www.extremetech.com...
:shk:
edit on 7-8-2012 by DerepentLEstranger because: added source



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


yeah sounds pretty junky ~ but it's all about power requirements and the job at hand. The processors are perfectly adequate for their tasks because they really don't have much to think about -- mostly just instrument drivers, temporary data storage, communications and system monitoring. Running the browser on your computer right now is far far more complicated than anything the rover's computer needs to handle ...



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by excentryk
reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


yeah sounds pretty junky ~ but it's all about power requirements and the job at hand. The processors are perfectly adequate for their tasks because they really don't have much to think about -- mostly just instrument drivers, temporary data storage, communications and system monitoring. Running the browser on your computer right now is far far more complicated than anything the rover's computer needs to handle ...



lol i know
also the hardware is tried and tested

like the 27 year old OS

Software

On the software side of things, NASA again stuck to tried-and-tested solutions, opting for the 27-year-old VxWorks operating system. VxWorks, developed by Wind River Systems (which was acquired by Intel), is a real-time operating system used in a huge number of embedded systems. The previous Mars rovers (Sojourner, Spirit, Opportunity), Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft all use VxWorks. VxWorks also powers BMW iDrive, the Apache Longbow helicopter, and the Apple Airport Extreme and Linksys WRT54G routers (really).

I said that VxWorks is 27 years old, but that’s a bit unfair: The initial release was in 1985 (around the same time as MS-DOS 3.0), but it has been in constant development since then, reaching v6.9 last year. Why does Curiosity use VxWorks? It’s reliable, has a mature development toolchain, and presumably its low-level scheduling and interrupt systems are ideal for handling real-time tasks like EDL (entry, descent, and landing; aka, seven minutes of terror).
www.extremetech.com...
but c'mon

why is all the good stuff reserved for military applications
but nasa can't develop something more up to date?

i'm not saying they should run Windows

or stuff a mac mini server in there

but c'mon the quality of the 1st pics even has the
we never landed on the moon crowd
out in force.



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 



LOL, where I come from VxWorks (and running 386's in Real mode) and uCrium OS are still the preferred OS of the military. So, I always take it with a huge pinch of salt when I hear military technology is so much more advanced. When I did R&D for the military, they didn't want to have the latest and greatest (with all the bugs and unknowns), but wanted the proof-and-tested stuff that is quite old.....

I would assume the same would apply for space technology too...



edit on 7/8/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


Agreed~ I guess they felt they had to get an image out asap ... the 'real' camera is sure to give impressive results ...

... although the hoaxies still won't be impressed ~ being faked in a studio and all that...



posted on Aug, 7 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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lag, atmospheric content, dust, more dust, seriously lots and lots of dust, gears clogging with dust. i don't believe it is technically feasible at this point to put any kind of "quadrotor" aerial vehicle on mars for video and and pictures. there are too many variables, and the cost/benefit ratio would be totally skewed towards too costly with the limited time it would last in the environment. it's acool idea though. i hope one day they figure out a way to do it.
edit on 7-8-2012 by optimus primal because: (no reason given)



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