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NCAA source: "Unprecedented" penalties against Penn State

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posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 08:25 AM
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Originally posted by BIHOTZ
honestly after the NAACP defending NAMBLA, I just dont trust them anymore.


the ncaa could care less about those kids involved nor the innocent students who will feel the brunt of this, they care about money and popularity, same as the broken society they hail from.

just ask any resident's of Aurora, Colo. if they should be punished for what one man did. yes lets teach them a lesson also.


we need to send a message to towns across the land, if you have criminals and they commit a crime you will all suffer the consequences.




posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 



I think it shows, once again, the people at or near "the top" don't mind a little child rape. When someone steals or embezzles, they are locked away for ever. When they rape children? Meh....

How typical.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 08:53 AM
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NCAA Hits Penn State With $60 Million Fine, Postseason Ban, Loss Of Scholarships And Wins

www.huffingtonpost.com...

One day after the statue of Joe Paterno was removed from outside of Beaver Stadium on the Penn State campus, NCAA President Mark Emmert announced sanctions resulting from the football program's role in the sexual abuse scandal involving former defensive coach Jerry Sandusky. On Sunday, the NCAA announced its intention to implement "corrective and punitive measures" against Penn State.

On Monday, Emmert presided over a press conference in Indianapolis and revealed sanctions, including fines, postseason ban, and loss of scholarships.

"Football will never again be placed ahead of educating, nurturing and protecting young people," Emmert said during a press conference that lasted approximately 45 minutes.

Penn State Punishments:





•$60 million fine, representing approximately one year of football profits.


•4-year bowl game ban.


•Scholarship reduction, cap lasting four years.


•Any entering, returning football student athlete can transfer immediately. Presuming academic requirements are met, these potential transfers can play immediately.

•PSU vacates all wins from 1998-2011.


•PSU begins a five-year probationary period, with the NCAA reserving the right to implement further punishments.



The announcement of these punishments comes less than two weeks after former FBI director Louis Freeh released his 267-page scathing report indicating that Joe Paterno and three top Penn State officials "repeatedly concealed critical facts" about the child-sex abuse committed by Sandusky.

Although Emmert previously indicated that the NCAA's "Death Penalty" was on the table in this case, Penn State football will not be suspended. Speaking about the NCAA's decision not to impose the Death Penalty, as it did to SMU during the 1980s, Emmert said that the "suspension of the football program would bring significant unintended harm."


edit on 23-7-2012 by Vitruvian because: edit



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 09:39 AM
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Vacating the wins moves Joe Paterno from all time winningest coach to #8 on the list.

Good move IMO.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 



Its a terrible way to have gotten there, but I'm still happy for Bobby.

Good for Bobby, he deserves it.

Something to be said for keeping ones nose clean.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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Is this what they call justice? 60 million? Nothing like feeding on a carcass. JoePa is dead and Sandusky is in jail, for the crime HE COMMITTED. What did the football team do? It seems to me, like someone is trying to ship the steel to china.
Why do i feel like Sandusky was a patsy for something more sinister??? Someone is protecting their best interest, by blowing up the whole building; kinda like Building # 7!!!



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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reply to post by SpittinTruth
 


I posted this in another thread, but its worth repeating....

We don't have access to all the investigative materials, but reading between the lines, I get the impression that the reason he still had that access was because the University was in CYA status. The original allegations were made, he lost his job, but he had dirt on the University, so they allowed him to keep his access as part of an agreement that was supposed to keep a lid on everyone's dirt.

The fact that the University had knowledge of enough wrong-doing to fire him, but didn't notify law enforcement, and didn't take away his access to kids, and didn't take their name association away from his organization is plenty of reason for this big penalty in my opinion.

As a parent, if I send my kid to a football camp at Penn State University, I assume the things that happen there are endorsed by the University.

I used to love JoePa, but I think he dropped the ball on this one, and I think he dropped the ball, because the admin told him to drop the ball, because the University had some liability exposure and they wanted the whole thing buried. Burying it led to more abuse, so they are liable. More than liable, disgusting.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by SpittinTruth
Is this what they call justice? 60 million? Nothing like feeding on a carcass. JoePa is dead and Sandusky is in jail, for the crime HE COMMITTED. What did the football team do? It seems to me, like someone is trying to ship the steel to china.
Why do i feel like Sandusky was a patsy for something more sinister??? Someone is protecting their best interest, by blowing up the whole building; kinda like Building # 7!!!


The Athletic Director knew, and covered it up. I would say that his makes the entire program suspect and liable.

Along the way, countless people knew, and did nothing. I would say that this makes the culture of Penn State liable.

What they did, the NCAA, was not enough. As a matter of fact, it was the wrong action entirely. They should have required the resignation of any person who could have, or should have, known about it and ignored a duty to act. Each of these people should be banned from collegiate sports.

Just like the Nazi's, saying "it wasn't my job" or "i was following orders" should not be tolerated as an excuse. So many professionals who ignored their duty to act. Each and every one of them should be held to account, at least on a professional level.

Whenever any of us want to feel pity for the students who are enrolled, just remember the pity we should have for that little boy who was observed having his fleshed slapped against Sandusky. He needed anyone along the way to be his hero, and they all failed him.
edit on 23-7-2012 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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"The Franklin Cover-Up' author talks about how he linked Sandusky and Penn State abuse scandal years ago"

www.reddirtreport.com...



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 02:40 PM
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Originally posted by CynicalWabbit
reply to post by butcherguy
 




Personally, I think it is silly for institutions of higher learning to give scholarships to students on a basis of their athletic abilities and form the 'farm teams' for the NFL.


Being an NFL farm team may be true but who are you to deny the student athletes with scholarships the chance to an education when they possibly could not afford to go to college without that scholarship


What about all the other kids who DO want to get an education but aren't lucky enough to be blessed with athletic talent...or be male?

Most of them can't really afford an education, either. It's called an ACADEMIC scholarship or student loans.



The only people who will be hurt by NCAA sanctions are the student athletes, they will lose their scholarships AND they many not be able to transfer to another college and get a scholarship and as expensive as college is they may not be able to afford to return to college. Now tell me that this is fair to the student athlete


Fair has nothing to do with it--life isn't fair and the sooner these kids learn that the better off they'll be.

When you lay down with dogs, you wake up with fleas. It's not fair, but that's the way it is.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 

I would also say that programs the nation over should be reevaluated, and processes put in place.


I couldn't agree more...this is the perfect time for the NCAA to reevaluate and put new process into place that will address this issue in the future. So the next time someone walks into a locker room and sees a child being raped they will know exactly what and who to report the incident to.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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Originally posted by Alena Michelle

Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 

I would also say that programs the nation over should be reevaluated, and processes put in place.


I couldn't agree more...this is the perfect time for the NCAA to reevaluate and put new process into place that will address this issue in the future. So the next time someone walks into a locker room and sees a child being raped they will know exactly what and who to report the incident to.


Its not that I'm disagreeing with you exactly, but just DAMN! "The next time." And the idea that someone walking into a locker room and seeing a child being raped will need to know what to do?

I mean, sure, it sounds like a good idea to have more oversight, but is it really needed? Are there really other child rapes going on in locker rooms regularly, and is this something that might happen again? I don't know the answer to that, but I pray the answer is NO.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


i would have thought they would have known what to do this time. but obviously we were wrong.



posted on Jul, 23 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready

Originally posted by Alena Michelle

Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 

I would also say that programs the nation over should be reevaluated, and processes put in place.


I couldn't agree more...this is the perfect time for the NCAA to reevaluate and put new process into place that will address this issue in the future. So the next time someone walks into a locker room and sees a child being raped they will know exactly what and who to report the incident to.


Its not that I'm disagreeing with you exactly, but just DAMN! "The next time." And the idea that someone walking into a locker room and seeing a child being raped will need to know what to do?

I mean, sure, it sounds like a good idea to have more oversight, but is it really needed? Are there really other child rapes going on in locker rooms regularly, and is this something that might happen again? I don't know the answer to that, but I pray the answer is NO.


Before this came to light I would have thought that no one would need someone to tell them the proper procedure to follow when they found a child being raped but it seems that at least this one person did need some guidance. But instead of calling 911 or kicking some perv butt he walked out and then called his dad to see what he should do. So, yes I do believe that there needs to be rules and reg.s to deal with this issue in the future. I too hope there are no other children being raped in locker rooms and I also prey this is not the case. But do I think this is the last time this will come to light? No I don’t. Thus new rules and reg.s.
edit on 23-7-2012 by Alena Michelle because: (no reason given)



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