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NewsFlash: Rumors Swirling that CERN will Confirm Existence of Higgs Boson

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posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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I'm surprised no one caught onto this.
Now it's just rumors however it's a big rumor.
Confirmation of Higgs Boson will be a big news event.
Assuming it's true of course.




Scientists at CERN might be on the verge confirming the existence of what they call the "Higgs boson", according to rumors circulating this week. Higgs, they believe, is a particle, or set of particles, that might give others mass.

According to Columbia University mathematician, Peter Woit, "CERN will soon have to decide how to spin this: will they announce discovery of the Higgs, or will they wait for some overwhelmingly convincing standard to be met, such as 5 sigma in at least one channel of one experiment? The bottom line though is now clear: there’s something there which looks like a Higgs is supposed to look. Attention will soon move to seeing if this signal is exactly what the SM [Standard Model] predicts (e.g. will the excesses in different channels agree with SM predictions?)."




posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


OK, so they have a multi-billion dollar complex widget (but still a widget), with funds from a load of different countries, they are going to have to say something, even if it's Bath Salts (BS). If they don't actually find something or make-up something, well I guess CERN is going to be the pink elephant in the room. I hope they really find the Higgs or alternates, but the problem I guess is determining whether or not the information put out can be trusted. These people probably have funding from the same NGO's and institutions that gave us anthropomorphic global warming and we all know that ended, I think the key word there was fraud?

But let's say they do find the Higgs or alternates, I wonder if all that information is going to made public from a practical application standpoint? Or will it all simply disappear, like so many discoveries before it, into the military-industrial complex?

Cheers - Dave



posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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Will it quietly disappear because nobody (including myself) understands any of what that means, and people are still so involved with donating $$ to the poor old lady on the bus who was bullied, or more interested in the the darn Sandusky trial??

Until people have a concept of what that truly means, news agencies wont report on it....Its all about ratings.....
I give a S&F
because now I am interested in finding out more



posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 06:35 PM
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If they don't actually find something or make-up something, well I guess CERN is going to be the pink elephant in the room.


Far from it. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as actually finding it.



posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 06:43 PM
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Ok lets say they find the Higs and prove it exists. How will they use this knowledge to repay society for the cost of building the billion dollar toy?



posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 07:12 PM
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Well,...uh they would be able to make more smaller cheaper electronics to sell to you................for more $.
They may find out the secrets to what mass actually is........should help in dieting......

All kinds of spinoffs may be possible from such a fundamental confirmation of our current theory....it may set science firm foundations for understanding the universe......to now there are competing theories which do not cover all the bases .from this they could reverse engineer the universe for us..



posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 07:16 PM
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Originally posted by Xeven
Ok lets say they find the Higs and prove it exists. How will they use this knowledge to repay society for the cost of building the billion dollar toy?


Well, they invented the World Wide Web.

Oh you mean Higgs and completing the electroweak theory? No obvious applications yet, but then again there weren't any for General Relativity either and now we have GPS and gravitational lensing is an accepted technique in astrophysics.

Contrary to popular belief, 95% of the mass in ordinary stuff does not come from the Higgs mechanism (which in its pure form really only explains rest masses of electrons, it is around electroweak interaction). Most of it comes bound in the energy of gluons holding the quarks together, at least in standard QCD theory.
edit on 21-6-2012 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 10:59 PM
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Originally posted by BagBing



If they don't actually find something or make-up something, well I guess CERN is going to be the pink elephant in the room.


Far from it. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as actually finding it.


Give me 10 billion dollars and I'll sign a letter saying I didn't find the Higgs Boson, mmmm, 'k. Joking aside, yes, if they don't find the Higgs, that is important as it may create modifications to the standard model so that other predictions can be tested. However, the price tag is incredibly high and it is literally impossible to prove a negative. Therefore a non-answer is not an answer, as not finding the Higgs could be the result of programming/operator error, sensor error, array placement error, magnetic containment error, etc.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Jun, 21 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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actually second time.
,,
the first time was ignored,, the there was the opps pulled a plug,, episode,,
so,,
NewsFlash: Rumors Swirling that CERN will Confirm Existence of Higgs Boson
yea everyone wave.

lol..get it,, wave,,,



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 01:00 AM
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Originally posted by bobs_uruncle

Originally posted by BagBing



If they don't actually find something or make-up something, well I guess CERN is going to be the pink elephant in the room.


Far from it. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as actually finding it.


Give me 10 billion dollars and I'll sign a letter saying I didn't find the Higgs Boson, mmmm, 'k. Joking aside, yes, if they don't find the Higgs, that is important as it may create modifications to the standard model so that other predictions can be tested. However, the price tag is incredibly high and it is literally impossible to prove a negative. Therefore a non-answer is not an answer, as not finding the Higgs could be the result of programming/operator error, sensor error, array placement error, magnetic containment error, etc.

Cheers - Dave


All you show is that you don't understand any of this. They are testing the theory, and have already ruled out a large range of places the Higgs could be hiding. If it is not find in the last of the ranges to be tested more scientists will pour through the information, and if no one can find any error, many will move on and make new predictions. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as finding it. You writing something meaningless is just that.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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I've been following this, but from what I read all seems to pile up to they have confirmation and are going to release info july 4th.

higgs bison is what gives matter it's mass. In all honestly we are a few decades from FTL ( Faster than light ) travel imo. Not only that, but once we understand dark matter, we may have an infinite energy source.




If physicists confirm that the Higgs boson exists, the discovery would also confirm that the Higgs mechanism for particles to acquire mass is correct. And, it may offer clues to the next mystery down the line, which is why individual particles have the masses that they do.





The Standard Model is the reigning theory of particle physics that describes the universe's very small constituents. Every particle predicted by the Standard Model has been discovered — except one: the Higgs boson. "It's the missing piece in the Standard Model," said Jonas Strandberg, a researcher at CERN working on the ATLAS experiment. "So it would definitely be a confirmation that the theories we have now are right. If we don't [find the Higgs] it means we made some assumptions that are wrong, and we have to go back to the drawing board."





Supersymmetry is attractive because it could help unify some of the other forces of nature, and even offers a candidate for the particle that makes up dark matter. Depending on the actual mass of the Higgs boson, it could lend credence to supersymmetry, or cast doubt on the theory.


Source
edit on 23-6-2012 by Moneyisgodlifeisrented because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 01:27 AM
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According to Woit, yes, they found a particle that matches the SM's predictions for the Higgs. I don't know if I trust him, though, but we shall see.


What they are seeing is exactly what they were looking for (with the interesting caveat that the production rate may be higher than expected, but that calculation is hard).

So, either this is the Higgs, or if it’s something different, you have to explain why it is doing precisely what the Higgs was supposed to do. Anyway, the big effort from now on will be trying to more precisely measure the properties of this signal to compare to the SM prediction.


But if the 'production rate is higher than expected', it may mean they know where it's at, they just need to revise the equations. This conference may be to request peer-review.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 03:28 AM
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reply to post by imherejusttoread
 


The only way they would know the production rate is if they have found it. It needs peer review to see if whatever they found is indeed the Higgs.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 04:45 AM
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reply to post by BobAthome
 


The previous times were unsubstantiated rumours. What exactly are you getting at?



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 05:20 AM
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Nobody who has seen the new data is talking, except to say not to believe the blogs, where a rumor of an enhanced signal has ricocheted around, and to warn that even if the signal is real, it may require much more data and analysis to establish that it actually acts like the Higgs boson and not an impostor.

“Please do not believe the blogs,” Fabiola Gianotti, the spokeswoman for the team known as Atlas, after its huge detector, pleaded in an e-mail.


www.nytimes.com...



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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well i know what the answer is yes we have found the higgs boson but in the process we accidentally created a stable micro black hole that isnt evaporating and has fallen towards the center of earth we think it might be mobnths before it swallows up earth so there is at least time to celebrate higgs discoveryy yay.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by proteus33
 


actually the Higgs Bosun is a completely random generated particle,, yet not random,,which facilitates the creation of matter..in space and this percieved dimention.

so i do belive your thinking of dence-anti-matter.



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04

Originally posted by bobs_uruncle

Originally posted by BagBing



If they don't actually find something or make-up something, well I guess CERN is going to be the pink elephant in the room.


Far from it. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as actually finding it.


Give me 10 billion dollars and I'll sign a letter saying I didn't find the Higgs Boson, mmmm, 'k. Joking aside, yes, if they don't find the Higgs, that is important as it may create modifications to the standard model so that other predictions can be tested. However, the price tag is incredibly high and it is literally impossible to prove a negative. Therefore a non-answer is not an answer, as not finding the Higgs could be the result of programming/operator error, sensor error, array placement error, magnetic containment error, etc.

Cheers - Dave


All you show is that you don't understand any of this. They are testing the theory, and have already ruled out a large range of places the Higgs could be hiding. If it is not find in the last of the ranges to be tested more scientists will pour through the information, and if no one can find any error, many will move on and make new predictions. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as finding it. You writing something meaningless is just that.


After designing particle accelerators, ring laser systems, adiabatic reactors and a number of other devices that use the practical application of physics, I think I do know where I am coming from ;-) But everyone has a right to their opinion.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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I'm not sure I get the problem with the price tag.

Surely $10 billion to learn/confirm fundemental physics is well worth the price. What else does 10 billion buy... a couple of days at war? Or less than the cost of hosting a running and jumping event in London...
edit on 25-6-2012 by BagBing because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by bobs_uruncle

Originally posted by OccamsRazor04

Originally posted by bobs_uruncle

Originally posted by BagBing



If they don't actually find something or make-up something, well I guess CERN is going to be the pink elephant in the room.


Far from it. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as actually finding it.


Give me 10 billion dollars and I'll sign a letter saying I didn't find the Higgs Boson, mmmm, 'k. Joking aside, yes, if they don't find the Higgs, that is important as it may create modifications to the standard model so that other predictions can be tested. However, the price tag is incredibly high and it is literally impossible to prove a negative. Therefore a non-answer is not an answer, as not finding the Higgs could be the result of programming/operator error, sensor error, array placement error, magnetic containment error, etc.

Cheers - Dave


All you show is that you don't understand any of this. They are testing the theory, and have already ruled out a large range of places the Higgs could be hiding. If it is not find in the last of the ranges to be tested more scientists will pour through the information, and if no one can find any error, many will move on and make new predictions. Not finding the Higgs is just as important as finding it. You writing something meaningless is just that.


After designing particle accelerators, ring laser systems, adiabatic reactors and a number of other devices that use the practical application of physics, I think I do know where I am coming from ;-) But everyone has a right to their opinion.

Cheers - Dave


And I built the atomic bomb. I find it highly unlikely you can have such a poor understanding of science and be capable of any of that. Your complete lack of understanding is proven in this post, and many others. If you truly do design particle accelerators how do you lack any understanding of what they are doing?





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