NUCLEAR RADIATION EVENT in South Bend Indiana USA + Call to NRC Hotline

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posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by cavtrooper7
I wonder if this could be an exposure of some type of device?


The Ark of the Covenant was just transported through maybe!





... couldn't resist




posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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I'm in Lafayette, IN and I haven't heard a peep! Suspicious though, the leak in the plant near Toledo and then the counter in South Bend gets high readings? hmmmmm



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee


What is the agenda for a person who wants to call people names for sharing their thoughts, insights, questions, or concerns on an adult conversation website?

 


As I said I wasn't calling anyone names. Stating that Fukashima failed because of a quake ..(And by doing this implying that US reactors subject to earthquakes would fail the same way)... is fear mongering. Because it wasn't because of the quake (but the Tsunami) that caused Fukashima to fail.

What is the agenda of people who fear monger nuclear power? It is their opposition that spends millions to make people believe nuclear is more dangerous and results in catastrophic fatalities when an accident occurs. While nuclear power is not free from problems, other energy productions causes just as much and in some cases more problems.

So my agenda is that you look at all of them while refraining to shout proverbial bloody murder about nuclear just because someone wants you to.




posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 05:53 PM
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Originally posted by kat2684
reply to post by boncho
 


Boncho, I'm skeptical of nuclear power plants, because you can stop them from producing electricity, but when you seperate the fuel rods, they definately don't cool overnight. You can't just stop Fukashima from leaking radiation, or just shut it down. I can't predict the future, while Indiana seems safe from natural disasters, who is to say, it can't be a target for something in the future. This world we are living in has got pretty unbelievable over the last decade, you can't just write off the crazy stuff anymore.


Fukashima was protected against quakes but not Tsunamis, while being constructed on a coastline. Not the most brilliant engineering choice, and a lesson to be learned from. Unfortunately, zoning issues arise out of construction of nuke plants, and while the best-most suitable areas are open in some cases, many people don't want them constructed in their back yard.

Leaving it open for the wrong area being used. Not sure in the case of Fukashima and the designers, why they would put it there in the first place. I imagine that liked the idea of the ocean so close for cooling issues.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by antar
Here in mo. I saw a HUGE amount of what could only be described as chem trails littering the morning skies today.

Now I do not ever jump on the chem trail issues or discussions but after reading this thread it is what stands out most to me now.

Were the chemtrails placed there to thwart the effects of something ever more dangerous in the atmosphere or could it be even more diabolical and just the opposite?

Could it be Fukishima radiation?

How can numbers go so high and then sail back down in such a short period of time?

Are there chemicals which could throw off the actual readings so as to avoid panic?


The skies have been very "busy" all day and still are. The optimist in me would like to believe they are an attempt to thwart something, however with everything else TPTB are doing from drones on I'm not so sure.

Fukushima is an ongoing disaster and from TEPCO's own reports far from under control and suffering ongoing sensor fluctuations that appear to indicate criticality occurring at times. None of us really know what is happening there so it is always a possibility.

I'm not sure about chemicals, but I have been wondering if some type of electrostatic particles could be used to "clump" the particles up. So much has been dumped in the Pacific that clumps being created with an electrostatic "seed" and then dropping into the ocean could go potentially unnoticed. Could a mass of them stay aloft and make it far across the country under the right conditions?



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 06:00 PM
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1/2 hour away and not a peep

Second Line

Third Yawn



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by ed1320
 


wait, where are you at, it's two hours from me too.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Why not address the original post I replied to instead of trying to slap me with self righteous replies:




Originally posted by kat2684
Nuclear power plants, are just that, plants. They are designed to last only 40 years. I'm sure there will be some agenda involving them,


Actual concern, but also two sides to it. Currently plants are being re-licensed to operate beyond their 40 years. The 40 year lifespan (while seemingly definite, does not mean they will fall apart beyond.) This is something worth looking into, and speaking to your politicians about should you live near a plant that is being re-licensed. The move, I think has more to do with original operators trying to recoup build cost, and investors (new operators) looking to realize profit on a cheap investment. The best news in this case, is that new operators know how much they stand to lose if there is a problem.


So far, 66 of 104 reactors have been granted license renewals. Most of the 20-year extensions have been granted with scant public attention. And the NRC has yet to reject a single application to extend an original license. The process has been so routine that many in the industry are already planning for additional license extensions, which could push the plants to operate for 80 years, and then 100.



Regulators and industry now contend that the 40-year limit was chosen for economic reasons and to satisfy antitrust concerns, not for safety issues. They contend that a nuclear plant has no technical limit on its life.


and rebuttal:


Lahey dismisses claims that reactors were made with no particular life span. "These reactors were really designed for a certain lifetime," he said. "What they're saying is really a fabrication."


Link




Fukashima was built on a fault line, is that smart? Of course not, unless you want them to meltdown.


And we know this because every reactor built on or near a fault line has suffered a melt down? Skyscrapers are also built on fault lines. Some are very well adapted to survive quakes.



Alex Jones already had callers saying people are doing drills in Hazmat suites, on man claimed to be a police officer, and witnessed it.


Alex Jones is an idiot. "Claimed" to be a police officer.... If that is supposed to mean anything at all.


Sick things are unfolding in incriments, I'm sure if this plant starts melting down, its by design.


I think if plants were designed to melt down we would see more of them...



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 



Fukashima was protected against quakes but not Tsunamis, while being constructed on a coastline. Not the most brilliant engineering choice, and a lesson to be learned from.


Actually, the lesson was there before and Fukushima's operators were warned that the site could experience a large tsunami:


In other words, Tokyo Electric scientists realised as early as 2007 that it was quite possible a giant wave would overwhelm the sea walls and other defenses at Fukushima by surpassing engineering assumptions behind the plant's design that date back to the 1960s.


SPECIAL REPORT - Japan engineers knew tsunami could overwhelm Fukushima plant

There are plenty of other articles on this topic, and reading them it is clear that because Tepco's engineers could not conceive of such a possibility, they ignored the fact that there was a history of equivalent tsunamis in the past.

There is also substantial evidence that there was significant damage caused by the quake which could have resulted in the accident regardless of the tsunami:


The Independent has spoken to several workers at the plant who recite the same story: serious damage, to piping and at least one of the reactors, occurred before the tsunami hit. All have requested anonymity because they are still working at or connected with the stricken plant. Worker A, a maintenance engineer who was at the Fukushima complex on the day of the disaster, recalls hissing, leaking pipes.

"I personally saw pipes that had come apart and I assume that there were many more that had been broken throughout the plant. There's no doubt that the earthquake did a lot of damage inside the plant... I also saw that part of the wall of the turbine building for reactor one had come away. That crack might have affected the reactor."

The reactor walls are quite fragile, he notes: "If the walls are too rigid, they can crack under the slightest pressure from inside so they have to be breakable because if the pressure is kept inside... it can damage the equipment inside so it needs to be allowed to escape. It's designed to give during a crisis, if not it could be worse – that might be shocking to others, but to us it's common sense." Worker B, a technician in his late 30s who was also on site at the time of the earthquake, recalls: "It felt like the earthquake hit in two waves, the first impact was so intense you could see the building shaking, the pipes buckling, and within minutes I saw pipes bursting. Some fell off the wall...


The explosive truth behind Fukushima's meltdown



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:26 PM
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These are two very interesting articles. personally i think we have much to fear as we have no protectors but wolves in sheep's clothing...
MAY 28, 2012


Nuclear Denial and the Resignation of Gregory Jaczko
Meltdown at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission
www.counterpunch.org...

Fears continue over potential collapse of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 4 high-level radioactive waste storage pool
MAY 29, 2012

www.beyondnuclear.org...



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Lebanese Networks > Anna Lindh Foundation > Anti-Nuclear lobby.

Check whois and research on your own if you are interested. Again, thank god we all look for unbiased sources to fuel our anger.




posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 08:48 PM
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Originally posted by ed1320
Thats like 2 hours form me ill look into this because im worried now. Indiana doesnt have any nuclear plants at all so where did it come from gonna dig now.
Did some checking nothing is coming up hopefully a bad detector ill wait and see will check back later.
edit on 7-6-2012 by ed1320 because: (no reason given)

Michigan city indiana has a plant. South bend doesnt though but is 30 miles or so from bridgman, mi.....



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical


Actually, the lesson was there before and Fukushima's operators were warned that the site could experience a large tsunami

 


Design and planning was a complete failure by the construction firm and it probably never should have been built there. Doesn't take a genius to know that the Japanese coast is susceptible to Tsunamis.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee
reply to post by Extralien
 

Interesting as there was an even but they are saying nothing escaped.

Nuclear Event in USA on Thursday, 07 June, 2012 at 17:11 (05:11 PM) UTC.
Description
Engineers at the Davis-Besse nuclear reactor near Toledo found a pinhole coolant leak in a pipe weld Wednesday evening while doing a walk-down inspection of the plant.


hisz.rsoe.hu...



this plant is on lake erie about 20 miles east of toledo. i dont think a leak there would end up in indiana. in simulations only areas downwind of a leak are affected. downwind being to the east of. indiana is in the wrong direction, no?



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by Urantia1111

Originally posted by Char-Lee
reply to post by Extralien
 

Interesting as there was an even but they are saying nothing escaped.

Nuclear Event in USA on Thursday, 07 June, 2012 at 17:11 (05:11 PM) UTC.
Description
Engineers at the Davis-Besse nuclear reactor near Toledo found a pinhole coolant leak in a pipe weld Wednesday evening while doing a walk-down inspection of the plant.


hisz.rsoe.hu...



this plant is on lake erie about 20 miles east of toledo. i dont think a leak there would end up in indiana. in simulations only areas downwind of a leak are affected. downwind being to the east of. indiana is in the wrong direction, no?


Have no idea, the problem area of high reading though on his map is just off the top left of Ohio and it was the same day. If unrelated very coincidental.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by rightaboutnow
i went to a skatepark up in michigan city indiana next to the sand dune Mt. Baldy and the michigan sea.. and the last time i was there i remember exactly right across the street from the skatepark sat a nuclear power plant. i felt weird all day as i was skating less than 100 ft away from something of such power. but i saw that somebody had said indiana doesn't have any power plants so i thought that i might add my 2 cents.


I was born and raised in Michigan city, Indiana and still a resident. I have been inside that "nuclear reactor". It is a water cooling tower for the coal generating electric plant right next to it. Lol no radiation coming off that thing. I was also in south bend today for a few hours, the epicenter of these readings. If anything, it may be coming from the Cook Nuclear Power Plant just north of South Bend, Indiana in southwest Michigan.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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The Governor of Indiana was in attendance at Bilderberg 2012... Coincidence I think not.
edit on 7-6-2012 by xynephadyn because: Sp



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:49 PM
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Looks to be a sensor fault.
For all we know the counter could be getting calibrated or someone is mucking around with by putting a radioactive source infront of it. Some more information about the radiation detected (alpha, beta or gamma), the meter itself, where its stored and who manages it would be appreciated.

For high radiation counts like that you would assume it would be more widespread with nuclear plants having their own meters and alarms setup to detect this.

" Perhaps a random pocket of radiation hitting the area or something else? "
Radiation blooms have to come from somewhere, counts like that are to high to be cosmic given Indiana still has a ozone layer above them. You really need to know what type of radiation to categories it.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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Dear OP,

We have experienced a major nuclear event in the Far East (worse than Chernobyl) which is polluting the planet with various types of radioactivity.

Readings like this have been recorded all over the planet, particularly after it rains.

Search YT. There are a number of videos posted there.

I've been lying to you about the danger, but what's new, eh?

Signed,
Uncle Sam



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 10:28 PM
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Downwind from Chicago.

This begs the question: If someone set off a dirty bomb in Chicago, would they tell anyone or would they just shut down the websites that report the increased radioactivity, and let out a press release talking about a 'pinhole leak' in a plant somewhere nearby?

Nothing to see here, move along all you glow in the dark sheep.





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