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DHS To Release Bacteria In Boston Subway System

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posted on May, 1 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by Jagermeister

The US Government using it's own people as guinea pigs?

Say it isn't so!


Sorry Jagermeister, looks like it is so.




1950 In an experiment to determine how susceptible an American city would be to biological attack, the U.S. Navy sprays a cloud of bacteria from ships over San Franciso. Monitoring devices are situated throughout the city in order to test the extent of infection. Many residents become ill with pneumonia-like symptoms.



1953 U.S. military releases clouds of zinc cadmium sulfide gas over Winnipeg, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Fort Wayne, the Monocacy River Valley in Maryland, and Leesburg, Virginia. Their intent is to determine how efficiently they could disperse chemical agents.



1953 Joint Army-Navy-CIA experiments are conducted in which tens of thousands of people in New York and San Francisco are exposed to the airborne germs Serratia marcescens and Bacillus glogigii.



1955 The CIA, in an experiment to test its ability to infect human populations with biological agents, releases a bacteria withdrawn from the Army's biological warfare arsenal over Tampa Bay, Fl.



1968 CIA experiments with the possibility of poisoning drinking water by injecting chemicals into the water supply of the FDA in Washington, D.C.


More




posted on May, 1 2012 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 

Hi mod,

I couldn't help but think of old poor Charlie lol
The Kingston Trio

Charlie on the M.T.A.
www.mit.edu/~jdreed/t/charlie.html - Similarto Charlie on the M.T.A.

To the Scollay Square station ... Charlie handed in his dime at the Kendall Square Station: that's pretty self-explanatory; and he changed for Jamaica Plain: As ...

visit the link for the full story

Let me tell you the story
Of a man named Charlie
On a tragic and fateful day
He put ten cents in his pocket,
Kissed his wife and family
Went to ride on the MTA

Charlie handed in his dime
At the Kendall Square Station

Chorus:
Did he ever return,
No he never returned
And his fate is still unlearn'd
Cheers lol



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


..because that wouldn't work. It is not a test on the people, it is to test sensors in the subway that detect biological attacks. They aren't testing people they are testing sensors.. it's there in your OP.

I do think it's weird that it says "healthy people" are safe. I am sure plenty of non healthy people ride the subway every day.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by karl 12
 


Didn't they also kill a bunch of sheep spraying a nerve agent/bacteria over a farm once? They were owned by a farmer who not only was probably at risk, but lost a lot of money.



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


Not harmful to healthy people? Um..what about unhealthy people? What are they, chopped liver? Or, better put, what are they, "useful eaters"?



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


The questions are, what, if any changes were made to the subtilis? I mean, were talking about an extremely common bacteria, one that is EVERYWHERE, subway included. So how will they tell the difference? will it be a straight up count of a filter catch? Is there some type of marker the the detectors can detect, and therefore differentiate from environmental samples, or will they flood the subway and count the difference between a regular day to see how much spreading happens?

On the one hand I like that they are doing this kind of testing, it shows that at least were thinking about vulnerabilities. On the other, it just sounds fishy, so its a good thing AJ is here to make it sound scary....

Studies on pathogen spreading in mass transit is exactly what DHS should be doing, no?



posted on May, 1 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by InLightTend
 


No they shouldn't.

Biological testing on civilians is illegal, the exception being for law enforcement purposes. How exactly is this for law enforcement purposes?



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by InLightTend
reply to post by ModernAcademia
 

The questions are, what, if any changes were made to the subtilis? I mean, were talking about an extremely common bacteria, one that is EVERYWHERE, subway included.
Bacillus subtilis is a soil bacteria, so while extremely common, I don't think they are that common in the subway tunnels.

 
 


Originally posted by METACOMET
reply to post by InLightTend
 
Biological testing on civilians is illegal, the exception being for law enforcement purposes. How exactly is this for law enforcement purposes?
This is not a test on civilians, it's a test on the sensors.

I read (most of) the PDF linked in the opening post (did anybody read that?), and because of the possible problem with unhealthy persons, they chose the least dangerous test.


Considering all of the concerns and studies examined above, Alternate 3 is the Proposed Action for these tests. This Alternative is considered to be the best balance of the risk of exposure to the public while maintaining the benefit for understanding the performance of these vital safety systems.


Alternative 3 is:

The third alternative is to conduct an aerosol release of nonviable (killed) B. subtilis spores for testing sensors during non-revenue hours for the subway. The trains would be operated to mimic a peak schedule, but no passengers would be in the stations.


That's why the MyFox article says:

Those tests would likely be held during off hours this summer.


And the CBS article quoted by Infowars says:

Federal officials say they test the subway sensors by releasing dead bacteria called B-subtilis. They say it is used in food supplements, has been rigorously tested and has no adverse health effects for low exposure in healthy people.


Dead bacteria, apparently, are still detected by the sensors but do not react with people more than any other kind of dust.

The amount of bacteria dust to be released is between 10 and 50 grams.



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 08:18 AM
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mmmmm, facinating. Then again humans are full of nasties that are transferred to one another on a daily basis. You can give someone something much nastier with just a sneeze or a cough. Why should what they're gonna use be any worse?

Granted they're usuing it to test something, in which case, they should clean up after the test. That would be asking too much now wouldn't it?

Honestly......would you expect any less from the US-SS?



posted on May, 2 2012 @ 10:18 AM
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Originally posted by GrandHeretic
mmmmm, facinating. Then again humans are full of nasties that are transferred to one another on a daily basis. You can give someone something much nastier with just a sneeze or a cough. Why should what they're gonna use be any worse?

Granted they're usuing it to test something, in which case, they should clean up after the test. That would be asking too much now wouldn't it?

Honestly......would you expect any less from the US-SS?

Hi gra,

I'd feel a lot better if they did the tests in their underground bunkers.
Or in the halls of Congress.
lol ljb



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 06:22 AM
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boston.cbslocal.com...

For any one in Boston if you want to fight it or at least get some more info for us!



As part of the legal process, a hearing will be held May 16, from 5:30-7:30pm at the Cambridge YMCA in Central Square. The public will be able to voice concerns and comments.
.

I know they are for sensing biological agents, But what agents and why would they be looking for that.

I have to wonder seeing as this IS ATS. The idea of conditioning or getting folks used to this type of action as harmless as this was. Will they always be OR will this become common to the point that in an emergency or Martial Law will they use a live bacteria or virus to get the people out easier.



posted on May, 17 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 

hello, i read something in my local paper a few weeks back that set alarm bells ringing as there was an article stating that my local water supplier was going to be adding organically grown bacillus bacteria into the sewers, so i decided to check my water suppliers website for more info, this is what i read,
full story
www.yorkshirewater.com.../

Fat Busting Bugs To Be Deployed in Dewsbury's Sewers 23/04/2012 Trillions of fat-busting bugs are being deployed in sewers in Dewsbury from Friday 27 April to get rid of fat blockages and prevent pollution. The innovative and environmentally-friendly treatment process is being targeted at nine known hot-spots across the town where build-ups of fat, oils and greases are causing repeated problems. It works by using organically grown bacillus bacteria, which is commonly found in the human gut, to feast on the fat, oils and grease, with the bacteria being mixed with non-chlorinated water before being poured into the sewer. Cooking fat, oils and grease get into the sewer from household drains, usually via the kitchen sink and appliances such as dishwashers. Over time, these substances build up on the inside of the sewer pipe and harden, reducing the flow capacity of the pipe and causing blockages, which can in worst case scenario's lead to sewers flooding people's homes and the environment.

I decided to do some research but quickly found that there are many types of bacillus bacteria's, this again seem a bit suspicious that they had left this out, so i emailed yorkshire water and got this reply

Dear Mrs
Thank you for your email dated 1 May 2012 .
We are carrying out a project regarding Bio-treatment.
This project is dosing a product called Bio-treatment to break down existing fat and stop further fat from building up in the public sewers.
We are testing this in Savile Town in Dewsbury.
COMPOSITION:
Enzymes & spore preparation bacterial amylase,
neutral proteinase and spore preparation of bacillus subtilis.
Kind regards
Roger Ferreira
Customer Correspondence Co-ordinator

Should i be concerned or am i just worrying over nothing? thanks



posted on May, 17 2012 @ 03:15 PM
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Here is what I found from epa.gov on the bug:

Reviews of Bacillus infections from several major hospitals suggest that B. subtilis is an organism with low virulence. Idhe and Armstrong (1973) reported that Bacillus infections were encountered only twelve times over a 6-1/2 year period. Species identification of these Bacillus infections was not made. In another hospital study over a 6-yr. period, only two of the 24 cases of bacteremia caused by Bacillus (of a total of 1,038 cases) were due to B. subtilis (as cited by Edberg, 1991). Many of these patients were immunocompromised or had long term indwelling foreign bodies such as a Hickman catheter.

B. subtilis has also been implicated in several cases of food poisoning (Gilbert et al., 1981 and Kramer et al., 1982 as cited by Logan, 1988).

As previously mentioned, B. subtilis produces a number of enzymes, including subtilisin, for use in laundry detergent products. There have been a number of cases of allergic or hypersensitivity reactions, including dermatitis and respiratory distress after the use of these laundry products (Norris et al., 1981).



posted on Jun, 1 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by cavtrooper7
 

hello, thank you for this info, i'm still getting used to using ats and i've only just seen your reply, cheers



posted on Sep, 4 2012 @ 10:06 PM
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And so it begins....

Feel safer now?

www.bostonherald.com...



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


i absolutely agree with you. test in a more controlled environment with people who are aware. the govment has enough closed facilities and there are plenty of people needing jobs to do the work to build a mock up. this sounds like the vd tests of long ago. besides would not an alarm system be like closing the barn door after the mule is out.




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