It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Here's a reason you should be concerned about internet privacy. Forget stupid "nothing to hide arg

page: 5
63
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by TheTardis
 


There have been parents ratted out by nosy picture developer people for that very thing....
On facebook I have seen nosy doogooders comment nastily on peoples beach pictures, talking about how they should not feed the pedos or some nonesense...
Apparently nowadays you gotta go through all your vacation pics, and ask yourself if a pedo might like it, or face the wrath of the nosey doogooders :/


Yep.. And dont even get me started on the whole sexting thing with teenagers. Same thing, there. They can bust a kid for having a picture of another kid their own age? How is that even right? Now if they pass it around to their buddies they cross a line but just having it? And they are the same age? Isnt that like looking at yourself in the bathroom mirror?




posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:15 PM
link   
reply to post by TKDRL
 


Here you go:

Parents sue Walmart after bath photos lead to sexual abuse nightmare

Home raided at gun point after Walmart employee sees 35 year old woman as "child"

You never have to do anything wrong to have the full wrath and stupidity of the law come crashing down on your head.
edit on 19-4-2012 by thisguyrighthere because: fixed link



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
reply to post by TKDRL
 


Here you go:

Parents sue Walmart after bath photos lead to sexual abuse nightmare

Home raided at gun point after Walmart employee sees 35 year old woman as "child"

You never have to do anything wrong to have the full wrath and stupidity of the law come crashing down on your head.


Hell my wife had one of those pictures as her wallpaper on her computer for a couple of years. She must have been a major perv.. lol



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by EarthCitizen07
 


The prohibitive prices out there for Cd and DVD forces me to download and preview anything before I dish out money for it. 99% of "entertainment" is crap, I watch, or listen once, then delete because it sucks. I am glad for that, I save a lot of wasted money.


Haha. Try buying a registered copy of microsoft office with excel, word, access, powerpoint. Last time I heard it was like $600 years ago. Everything is way over-priced compared to middle class salaries/wages.

As for music I listen to internet radio and videos I watch satellite television. Good thing for me I am not a fanatic in either. I am only a fanatic to computer games and I have spent hundreds of dollars in this regard. I guess you could say I am a computer geek!



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:31 PM
link   
reply to post by EarthCitizen07
 


I actually bought adobe CS3 design suite I think it was back in the day. OUCH, cost me more than my computer did lol. I try to stick with free opensource programs as much as possible these days. Haven't found one comparable to dreamweaver just yet.



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:36 PM
link   

Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by EarthCitizen07
 


I actually bought adobe CS3 design suite I think it was back in the day. OUCH, cost me more than my computer did lol. I try to stick with free opensource programs as much as possible these days. Haven't found one comparable to dreamweaver just yet.


Its unfortunate that software programs are not priced based on what went into making them but more on how they will be used. Any software sold to corporations is ridiculous and many times comes on cheap burned CD's and photo copied user manuals. Believe it or not a simulation software we once purchased for thousands came this way and you had to have MS Visio installed for it to even function. Yet a game title which might have hundreds or thousands more man hours put into its production and comes in a fancy box with a high dollar cd and book might be 50 or 60 bucks. Its crazy how random some things are and yet the government could care less about that. They care more about the fact that I might copy a CD, something that as mentioned before was not illegal until the invention of the cd burner. Companies use to sell dual cassette decks for this very reason. Funny how things change and people just accept it and in many cases, due to government propaganda will go grab a soap box and start yelling about it. From what I can tell all those rappers still live in million dollar homes.



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by EarthCitizen07
 


I actually bought adobe CS3 design suite I think it was back in the day. OUCH, cost me more than my computer did lol. I try to stick with free opensource programs as much as possible these days. Haven't found one comparable to dreamweaver just yet.


I am not good enough to be a computer nerd. just a computer geek...wannabe nerd!


Normally I look for things that are slightly outdated and save myself 30%-50% off the original price. 2-3 year old software. Also you can buy shareware classics for a really low price. Some games are worth paying top dollar to some people.

The free download option is risky business, not so much because of the fear of illegality, but because many of these programs are loaded with sypware and virii. The same people who provide cracks for the programs to work often spy on your profile as well.



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 05:17 PM
link   
reply to post by pianopraze
 


They aren't going to be able to just break encryption between two remote computers. Most SSL encryption used online to authenticate and secure a point to point connection uses a 2048 bit certificate. Thats 2 ^ 2048 - 1 (the correct key) permutations of an incorrect key. That's 3.23 x 10 ^ 616 incorrect encryption signatures and 1 correct one. Even for the older 64, or 128 bit encryption schemes more prevalent years ago, that's 2 ^ 64 - 1, or 18446744073709551615 permutations of wrong keys, and for 128 bit SSL encryption thats an even larger number..


So my question is.. since it's well established by the IEEE and the implementation of the SSL standard follows stringent guidelines and certainly does not allow for any "back door access" by government officials or otherwise, how then could the encryption possibly be cracked? Certainly not by brute force when we are talking having to go through 3.23 x 10 ^616 possible keys just to find the right one!
edit on 19-4-2012 by hombero because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 06:12 PM
link   
reply to post by hombero
 


Well... I did post this inconspicuously link in my OP:

There is still one technology preventing untrammeled government access to private digital data: strong encryption. Anyone—from terrorists and weapons dealers to corporations, financial institutions, and ordinary email senders—can use it to seal their messages, plans, photos, and documents in hardened data shells. For years, one of the hardest shells has been the Advanced Encryption Standard, one of several algorithms used by much of the world to encrypt data. Available in three different strengths—128 bits, 192 bits, and 256 bits—it’s incorporated in most commercial email programs and web browsers and is considered so strong that the NSA has even approved its use for top-secret US government communications. Most experts say that a so-called brute-force computer attack on the algorithm—trying one combination after another to unlock the encryption—would likely take longer than the age of the universe. For a 128-bit cipher, the number of trial-and-error attempts would be 340 undecillion (1036).

Breaking into those complex mathematical shells like the AES is one of the key reasons for the construction going on in Bluffdale.


Guess they are going to need a big computer to do it:

The plan was launched in 2004 as a modern-day Manhattan Project. Dubbed the High Productivity Computing Systems program, its goal was to advance computer speed a thousandfold, creating a machine that could execute a quadrillion (1015) operations a second, known as a petaflop—the computer equivalent of breaking the land speed record.

By late 2011 the Jaguar (now with a peak speed of 2.33 petaflops) ranked third behind Japan’s “K Computer,” with an impressive 10.51 petaflops, and the Chinese Tianhe-1A system, with 2.57 petaflops.

But the real competition will take place in the classified realm. To secretly develop the new exaflop (or higher) machine by 2018, the NSA has proposed constructing two connecting buildings, totaling 260,000 square feet, near its current facility on the East Campus of Oak Ridge. Called the Multiprogram Computational Data Center, the buildings will be low and wide like giant warehouses, a design necessary for the dozens of computer cabinets that will compose an exaflop-scale machine, possibly arranged in a cluster to minimize the distance between circuits. According to a presentation delivered to DOE employees in 2009, it will be an “unassuming facility with limited view from roads,” in keeping with the NSA’s desire for secrecy. And it will have an extraordinary appetite for electricity, eventually using about 200 megawatts, enough to power 200,000 homes. The computer will also produce a gargantuan amount of heat, requiring 60,000 tons of cooling equipment, the same amount that was needed to serve both of the World Trade Center towers.

In the meantime Cray is working on the next step for the NSA, funded in part by a $250 million contract with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. It’s a massively parallel supercomputer called Cascade, a prototype of which is due at the end of 2012. Its development will run largely in parallel with the unclassified effort for the DOE and other partner agencies. That project, due in 2013, will upgrade the Jaguar XT5 into an XK6, codenamed Titan, upping its speed to 10 to 20 petaflops.

Yottabytes and exaflops, septillions and undecillions—the race for computing speed and data storage goes on. In his 1941 story “The Library of Babel,” Jorge Luis Borges imagined a collection of information where the entire world’s knowledge is stored but barely a single word is understood. In Bluffdale the NSA is constructing a library on a scale that even Borges might not have contemplated. And to hear the masters of the agency tell it, it’s only a matter of time until every word is illuminated.


This is declassified... so what to you think they have that is classified?
edit on 19-4-2012 by pianopraze because: ...



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 07:51 PM
link   
It was on the news, I think a week ago, that the mayor of Orlando Fl. decided to make a forest area that homeless people were living into a park. Then he turn and made all the homeless people that was living in that forest to register as sex offenders even though most of them weren't. Because the law in Orlando is that sex offenders are not allow to step foot in any parks and can't live a certain distance from any parks.

They don't go after you unless you have been reported of downloading illegal porn. The person that reported you in. Have to have possession of your computer or know were you live. It doesn't matter if that person is your own brother. Has to turn you in. Otherwise, he will be convicted as accomplice to the crime.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 01:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Maslo
 


under blacks law , a victimless act is not a crime ,

corpus dilecti - the body of the crime , you need the act itself and then the injury loss or harm to a human being , their rights or their property before a crime can said to have been committed.

I agree though , all child porn and videos of deaths , snuff movies, people being killed or beaten on youtube , should be removed.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 02:01 AM
link   
MS stuff does cost a bomb, that's why I use Linux.
Open office, k office, Gimp..all free. There is tons of stuff out there.

Games aren't so hot for Linux, that's why I have a ps3 though.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 02:45 PM
link   
Online piracy does not exist. It is only a conspiracy orchestrated by the EU. It is essentially a deception designed by the EU intelligence services to make you believe that terrorists operate online using some sort of internet account.
Obviously this is first and foremost a deception for the nerds, IT-geeks and CCTV voyeurs. Clearly the EU uses this trick together with others to create the impression that there are pirates attacking private citizens online, or stealing their data. That is not the case! Only and exclusively the EU governments are responsible for interference with peoples privacy and security online especially if your IP address is located in EU territory.
Pirate hackers are just a bunch kids who should frankly be playing some other game. Nonetheless, this completely artificial and unnecessary online hacking and other criminal activity has created a whole new kind of non-productive geeky service sector of IT-nerds focusig on so called "security", and other somplete nonsese.

My question for you today is this one: Is IT-security nowadays an attempt by wall street and the city of London's bankers to repeat the Y2K scam and bubble?




top topics



 
63
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join