New Device Makes Wheelchairs Obsolete

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posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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Pretty cool.

It will open so many doors for people that have lost the use of their legs.




posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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Its a good start.

Growing up with a disabled mom - - - I know that balance and falling are a primary concern.

This device seems like it would only be good on a very flat surface.

It should be really great for young children and their self esteem.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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Great to see!

Thanks for sharing.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:00 PM
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Does it come with an all terrain package? Optional snowtires



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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One of the things that makes this device more beneficial to it's user, aside from the ability to see and interact with people at eye level, is the health benefit of being able to stand;


Many of us may take our ability to stand for granted, but the position is actually important for health. Being confined to a seated position increases the risk of blood clots, blood pressure abnormalities and kidney and urinary problems. Dr. Peter Gorman, chief of rehabilitation medicine at Kernan Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital in Baltimore, said paraplegics often lose bone mass in their legs, which puts them at a greater risk of fractures.


Robotic Device Helps Paraplegics Stand Tall



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:14 PM
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As a thinker and owner of two motorized wheel chairs (bought them for fun) I can walk fine. I see a failure of the wheel design, its needs to be wider so on uneven ground it will not tilt to the side. tge concept is great but they need to work on larger wheels like the segway and a foot platform like the segway.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:30 PM
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This type of stuff is what more of our tax cash should be spent on - developing devices which help people live better lives, instead of devices which cause maximum destruction.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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Well I'm pretty impressed, thank you for posting.

I think this will go a very long way to improving the overall quality of life of its users in so many ways. For many, it could even eliminate the need for a support worker! The only draw back I saw (apart from the terrain bit that others mentioned) is it looks pretty cumbersome to get into and out of. It would really depend on how often one would have to get out of it or adjust it, but I can picture that part being a bit of a nuisance



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:33 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by Screwed
 


My guess...if you were a quadriplegic or confined to a wheelchair, you'd be more impressed.

I'm not insulting you, just pointing out a different perspective.


I have been rolling for about 10 years now... And, I'm unimpressed.... (Well, for me personally anyway)

First thing that's a pain with that thing is time. I've got my transfers to my wheelchair down pretty quick now, I can pull it apart, throw it in my front passenger seat in about 90 seconds. That thing takes is seriously going to limit where I can go.

Secondly, steps. I can jump UP a single height step of around 15 cm's. And jump down steps up of about 20-25 cm's. Then there's road crossings and around me there is a 1/10slope down to the gutter, then to prove how stupid local governments are, they add a short uppsy bit at the butter bit.... There's no way that machine would get over/up/down something like that.

Then there's my local main street, which when built by the local farmers decided there should be a step at the front door of every damn shop! grrrrr! But, I can lift my front wheels up, grip the inside of the shop doorway and then pull myself in. I can't see that happening with this thing.




In a perfect crisp flat world, those tin 6cm wheels would be awesome! What I DO like about the machine is how it helps to assist standing. Remove all the motor/battery/wheels crap. Cut the cost down to under a thousand, and they'd have a sale to me. As a simple standing excercise machine, this thing would be useful and a fantastic benefit.

As it is, I'd much rather the wheelchair drive-in tank (see below) that thing is hella fun!
Actually, this isn't the exact one I was thinking of, but its close enough.
edit on 3-4-2012 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


That's absolutely perfect. Good for them. It's a game changer, that's for sure. It made me very happy to see that, thanks for sharing. S&F




posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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lol so unnatural. Can't wait for the day where we start putting people's brains in machine bodies so they don't die from terminal illness.
edit on 3-4-2012 by TheLegend because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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The comments on this thread are very interesting (particularly from those with direct experience and whose criticisms are the ones to really be listened to). When I watched the vid I called my son through to see it. He directed me to Honda's robotic legs which, from the little I have seen, they plan to use in industry but looks like this device may also facilitate greater freedom of movement.




posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 07:03 PM
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Untill there's a step to go over. Thing about traditional wheelchairs is that they have big wheels and can balance well. I dont see this design going anywhere.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 07:22 PM
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Originally posted by amraks
I seen something better than this in the works.
It was like robotic al legs you could walk up stairs and you bend your knees.

but nice find OP


My husband has a computerized type leg where the knee bends. Health insurance only pays so much toward it though. It's awesome!
edit on 3-4-2012 by Night Star because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 08:12 PM
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I saw an article recently About an MIT engineer working on an exoskeleton to allow paraplegics to move about, it is in the start of the human testing phase, though not as easy to get into it's not a major burden either. I will see if I can find the link to it and post it.

This is a site that discusses the referent people/companies researching it, the MIT guy is the farthest along for a usable system.

ExoSkeleton
edit on 3-4-2012 by Wolfie0827 because: Spelling



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by Fisherr
 

Although you make a point, this is awesome in that it allows flexibility to those trapped by a major disability. Expensive yes, but not necessarily out of reach. Disabled veterans who may be able to work will be delighted to have a chance to make a living. Anyway you look at it, this will be a huge answer to anyone who sees it as a means to reach their goal.

And that is whats so beautiful regarding Capitalism. There is a need that is being satisfied with entrepreneurial drive and science. A far better alternative to anything else that comes to mind.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by Annee
Its a good start.

Growing up with a disabled mom - - - I know that balance and falling are a primary concern.

This device seems like it would only be good on a very flat surface.

It should be really great for young children and their self esteem.

Yes it's a good start and I hadn't thought about a level surface.

It seems it would be good for parapalegics. I'm hemipalegic and it wouldnt be good for me, if it requires two hands to lift. With training I was taught to stand and I do try to stand several times a day out of neccesaty, but it's very painful and my balance isnt good. I have fallen a lot. I really liked the smoothness on how he was able to stand.

edit on 3-4-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by violet
 

Having grown up with a disabled (polio) mom - - - new devices always catch my eye. I've seen a few special documentaries on bio-wheelchairs and other bio-walkers.

How about this one?

www.bionicpars.com...



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
Once manufacturing in mass start the economies of scale would reduce unit costs. What you have now is a specialty item from one source.


This is true. Prototypes are always more expensive. Prototypes also generally have bugs.

Don't be an early adopter, kids. Wait for the price to come down, and for it to mature. Technology needs to be allowed to ripen.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Thanks OP.
I got to the part in this thread mentioning these are 15K a pop. I really think that that price could drop considerably if all the disabled vets were given one, I mean - Imagine the contract for that. "hey DOD here, just wanted to buy, oh, say 20K of these, can you cut a deal?" - and how great would that price drop be for those without .mi.? who knows, but it should be considerable under general economic rules.





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