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New Device Makes Wheelchairs Obsolete

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posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:11 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Very nice indeed. Its sad to say but a lot of advanced mobility devices have been spearheaded by DARPA as the result of combat injuries. One of the coolest mobility devices I've seen is an exoskeleton that provides a neural-integrated synthetic, or artificial limbs that one puts on a bit like a scaffold and associated arm and leg power-plant. One of the advantages of this was the ability, and "power ranger version" won't be available outside the military or special services, but can have a tremendous increase in physical strength, far above any human.

Something like this was seen in the 1986 movie Aliens, where Sigourney Weaver strapped on a "fork lift" which rumor has we now have similar devices that are far more maneuverable then regular fork lifts. And immensely strong. Also the military is working on "walking wearable tanks"that are also heavily armored. And very cool. Don't know how well it would do against the mama alien, but it could knock me or any person into next Tuesday.

But the sensing strength systems that are fully commensurable with human strength and capable of advanced synthetic sensors that allow for "feeling" of textural surfaces and hot and cold, but with reasonable protection will be coming down the pipe.But there are reasons you would want to integrate pain stimulators in case some one picked up something very hot or cold, enough to go through the hardware and injure someone.

Several years ago I developed an advanced pair of protective gloves (boots to follow) that provide protection but let you feel with great textural and tempeture specificity what your touching. I thought they would be great for rescue and fire fighters, but so far haven't been cleared outside of certain military services.

I have not gotten a rational answer in fact no reason as to why not. My guess is the material technology is very sophisticated, and aside from just feeling more detail and sub-optical structure better then your hand can what your touching, it can give you a material, sonic, radar, and IR scan of an objects density and even its chemical breakdown or biological activity.

Perhaps a simpler system will be declassified for fire fighters, etc. I am working on it and sure hope so.




posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by Annee
reply to post by violet
 

Having grown up with a disabled (polio) mom - - - new devices always catch my eye. I've seen a few special documentaries on bio-wheelchairs and other bio-walkers.

How about this one?

www.bionicpars.com...


I really like that!
That would work for me
Thanks for your reply



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Unfortunately, while this is a great invention, the fact that nothing that ever makes it into production is ever 100% efficient (more profitable that way), which means that it is not a matter of if, but when it breaks down. I can not imagine the kind of funk a paraplegic would be in if it broke down in a supermarket. Especially considering the level of general apathy among people these days, so it's unlikely that people would jump at the chance to help either.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by xXxinfidelxXx
reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Unfortunately, while this is a great invention, the fact that nothing that ever makes it into production is ever 100% efficient (more profitable that way), which means that it is not a matter of if, but when it breaks down. I can not imagine the kind of funk a paraplegic would be in if it broke down in a supermarket. Especially considering the level of general apathy among people these days, so it's unlikely that people would jump at the chance to help either.


Yes breakdowns happen, just like cars. Eventually normal wear and tear takes place.
I do have to say I have been pleasantly surprised by the kindness of others when I've got stuck. People are really nice!



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by cdesigns
As a thinker and owner of two motorized wheel chairs (bought them for fun) I can walk fine. I see a failure of the wheel design, its needs to be wider so on uneven ground it will not tilt to the side. tge concept is great but they need to work on larger wheels like the segway and a foot platform like the segway.

The foot platform may have been designed that size in regards to safety issues. The persons full body weight standing on it can catapult them right off like a springboard.
I didn't really take a good look at the foot rest.

EDIT: ok I looked again at foot rest.
Why do you want it bigger?
It needs to maneuver around corners or obstacles or narrow passageways. Not to mention hitting other people with it!

Any bigger would be in the way and defeats part of its purpose of being able to stand up in a small area or in crowds just like everybody else.
edit on 3-4-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by violet
Yes breakdowns happen, just like cars. Eventually normal wear and tear takes place.
I do have to say I have been pleasantly surprised by the kindness of others when I've got stuck. People are really nice!


What people who are not familiar with disabled don't know or realize is - - you don't just grab at someone in a "mobile device" who has fallen. You could injure them. You need to ask: "How can I assist you". So sometimes people do stand back until they figure out how to help. Also a main problem is fatigue

Oh - sorry - soapbox.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I do think these bio-walkers will be amazing for young children - - who seem to adapt to new things better then adults.


MBF

posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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This can be a wonderful device as long as you are on a flat completely level surface, but most surfaces are not. With the center of gravity as high as it will be, the operator will need to be more careful. Going up and down ramps can be a problem too. Both of my parents are in wheelchairs and most people have no idea as to the problems they have in maneuvering them around. People will run out in front of them and stop on a dime, just plain rude.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 10:30 PM
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Wow, that's so awesome!



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 11:20 PM
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The improvement on a wheel chair type device is great but I personally think that a device like the Honda legs or the Japanese HAL would greatly improve someones self-esteem/health and confidence in day to day life.


The HAL Suit



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 11:46 PM
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Originally posted by Strainz
The improvement on a wheel chair type device is great but I personally think that a device like the Honda legs or the Japanese HAL would greatly improve someones self-esteem/health and confidence in day to day life.


The HAL Suit


I would like a robot arm and hand



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


I was soooo hoping it was a JETPACK!

But this looks pretty badass- way to represent Turks!

The exercise capabilities are a brilliant addition.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 12:36 AM
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Someday soon being handicapped will not keep those who are handicapped from doing the things they love . I forwarded this to my brother . He has been in a wheel chair most of his life . Hope a "off road " model is in the future !



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 12:47 AM
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After 43 years in a wheelchair, I still prefer the manual wheelchair that folds and goes into my car. With that I can access house, neighbourhood, then car and trips, and be completely independent.

This might be all right for an 'extra' on a flat smooth surface in one's home, but elsewhere I wouldn't trust it or the people around me.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 01:14 AM
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Cool.

Now I want to see someone add this to it for some fun....




posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 01:52 AM
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Nice tech but it will - Never work.

Most physically challenged people cannot afford 15 thousand dollars for this thing. For this to be a Hit and a game changer, it would have to be affordable for the common man. That's not ever gonna happen.

This thing will cause more harm bu getting peoples hopes up that can't afford it.
edit on 4-4-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 03:09 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Shared to my Disability Blog! Thanks for this story.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 03:11 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Im sorry, but part of the reason why people opt for a wheelchair is because it promotes physical exercise (something an amputee gets little of) and a wheel chair cost...maybe $2-400? materials alone are available for anybody to build their own, the wheel chair has been there for us in need for countless years, and I don't think it will be made 'obsolete' any time soon by a bulky and possibly expensive piece of equipment.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 04:29 AM
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Thank you for the post BlackM

I think this will have use for when and where a wheelchair isn't practical or desirable,. If they make it smaller and even less obtrusive then the better. I love how you can "sit" in a normal chair, or "stand" at a podium, this will help pareplgic's fit in better with social situations or business situations.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 06:08 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


What about people that cant stand up, Nowhere can I see this to replace my grandfather's wheelchair.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 06:21 AM
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Great idea, Great concepts; however, here's the problem.

These things would most certainly be a fortune. I am sure the prices would be lowered with mass production, meaning mass ordering of them happens. I just don't see insurance paying for them as long as the original wheelchairs exist.









 
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