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Supernova 2012aw M95 Galaxy....WOW!

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posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 10:39 AM
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Very cool. A Supernova has been confirmed in the M95 Galaxy named 2012aw



It was noted a couple days ago according to This article, and sent in....

M95 Supernova Discovery




SUPERNOVA 2012aw IN M95 = PSN J10435372+1140177

Paolo Fagotti, Bastia Umbra, Italy, reports his discovery of a possible supernova (magnitude R = 15) near M95 = NGC 3351 on CCD images taken on Mar. 16.86 UT with a 0.5-m reflector (+ MX916 camera) at Porziano d'Assisi, Italy, the object measured to be located at R.A. = 10h43m53s.76, Decl. = +11d40'17".9 (equinox 2000.0 presumed).


Universe full of wonder!




posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 10:49 AM
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That is awesome! The end of days may come now as I have finally seen my first Super Nova



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 10:52 AM
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I wonder how many great pictures we will get of this Supernova?

Apparently iit is a Type II Supernova....sounds massive, but I don't know anything about Supernova so coule be wrong.




A Type II supernova (plural: supernovae) results from the rapid collapse and violent explosion of a massive star. A star must have at least 9 times, and no more than 40–50 times the mass of the Sun for this type of explosion.[1] It is distinguished from other types of supernova by the presence of hydrogen in its spectrum. Type II supernovae are mainly observed in the spiral arms of galaxies and in H II regions, but not in elliptical galaxies.[2]



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


M95? Isnt there a black hole in that region supposedly. It would be fun to see some of this explosion interact with that.

Awesome fine Vasa Croe!


+8 more 
posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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Its more amazing really when you think this super nova event is not actually happening now, it happened 38 million years ago, and we are just seeing it happen now, its mind boggling to think that something that happened so long ago can still be seen now, so far away



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 10:59 AM
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I looked on the discovery magazine website, and the video they have imbedded has been removed? Why? I hate when they remove things that are of great significance for further discussions. Obviously someone doesn't want us to see it...



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
I looked on the discovery magazine website, and the video they have imbedded has been removed? Why? I hate when they remove things that are of great significance for further discussions. Obviously someone doesn't want us to see it...


From what all I have been reading and finding, a lot of these guys have major copyright issues with this stuff, so when they find others posting it without reference they yank it.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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Finding interesting info here: Source

Sou rce

More pics and info also at: Spaceweather.com




M95 a Barred Spiral Galaxy located in the constellation Leo (next to Mars now). It has a peculiar core of strings clusters and currently several days ago a Super Nova has developed marked, Presently shines at magnitude 13 and is exspected to brighten more. Light reflections spikes due to Mars being close 1/2 deg. effected the image the inset is before without the SN. Same Equipment on both images and author.


Source[e ditby]edit on 21-3-2012 by relocator because: added another link



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


How can something like this be copyright? This is a universal issue, this just doesn't pertain to one particular entity whether it be NASA or whomever. Screw the copyright argument. What is really going on that they have to pull it?



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 

Great find!

Another picture that just popped up:




M95 a Barred Spiral Galaxy located in the constellation Leo (next to Mars now). It has a peculiar core of strings of clusters and currently several days ago a Super Nova (2012aw) has developed marked, Presently shines at magnitude 13 and is exspected to brighten more. Light reflections spikes due to Mars being close 1/2 deg. effected the image the inset is before without the SN. Same Equipment on both images and author.


Source: APOD Forum

And also this one:



Source

There's also a short video where we can see the supernovae appears:

Flickr


M95 imaged evening Mar 16th, showing SN 2012aw (can you spot it? see difference from previous image) 28x10min Luminance The streak is due to satellite in one of the frames Equipment: AP1200GTO; C11 EdgeHD @f/10, Atik 314L+ CCD, Astrodon Gen2E Luminance filter, Hutech OAG.

edit on 21-3-2012 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


How can something like this be copyright? This is a universal issue, this just doesn't pertain to one particular entity whether it be NASA or whomever. Screw the copyright argument. What is really going on that they have to pull it?


HAHAHA ... they tax rainfall for farmers in some areas of the globe. Its only a matter of time before someone claims oxygen and starts to tax all who use their air.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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I found your remark interesting....

reply to post by underduck
 


I found this:




Originally Posted by vinayjain
So what will be the effect of the energy librated and shockwave generated by the explosion on the black hole...............does black hole will be teared apart in this explosion.

No. The the gas and energy expelled from the explosion in the direction of the BH will form an accretion disc around the black and will fall in to be absorbed, causing it to grow in mass.

No external force will destroy a black hole.


Source



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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Originally posted by underduck
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


M95? Isnt there a black hole in that region supposedly. It would be fun to see some of this explosion interact with that.

Awesome fine Vasa Croe!

Every spiral galaxy has a super massive black hole at its core, including our own. The diameter of this galaxy is only about 70,000 light years (it's a lot smaller than our own galaxy), and that supernova seems to be out towards the edge of the disc, so if by "in that region" you mean within 25,000 light years or so, yes, you could say that.

Will this supernova interact with the super massive black hole at the galaxy's core? No. Too far away.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by Vasa Croe
I wonder how many great pictures we will get of this Supernova?

Apparently iit is a Type II Supernova....sounds massive, but I don't know anything about Supernova so coule be wrong.




A Type II supernova (plural: supernovae) results from the rapid collapse and violent explosion of a massive star. A star must have at least 9 times, and no more than 40–50 times the mass of the Sun for this type of explosion.[1] It is distinguished from other types of supernova by the presence of hydrogen in its spectrum. Type II supernovae are mainly observed in the spiral arms of galaxies and in H II regions, but not in elliptical galaxies.[2]



Supernovae are so massive they briefly outshine all of the light coming from the entire galaxy they are in. So you have one single star exploding with so much energy, it will outshine the light of tens, or even hundreds of billions of other stars.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by LifeInDeath
 


damn! Oh well. Still a spectacular sight.

For the record I will take 25,000 light years as "in that region" for space terms. I forgot that all spirals have black holes in the middle. Sooner or later we will all be incorperated into super massive one.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:49 AM
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Thanks fo0r the heads up. Havent had time to cruise the sites so I may have missed this. I can not wait to turn my telescope on this one for the first time. Right next to Mars too, can't be any easier to find than that.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 01:56 PM
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Great links. Thanks. Got some reading to do on supernovae now. It amazes me how there are so many HUGE incidents that occur in our universe that we rarely get a chance to see because of limitations of our technology. Makes me wonder what the possibilities are that maybe there was life near that star watching it as we probably would and then BANG.....gone.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 02:40 PM
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Great find!

Thanks for posting this!



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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Here is another one :




posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


How can something like this be copyright? This is a universal issue, this just doesn't pertain to one particular entity whether it be NASA or whomever. Screw the copyright argument. What is really going on that they have to pull it?


It can be copyright just like any picture taken by a private individual. The majority of the initial images from this supernova were from "amateur" astronomers. If they have a copyright on it and someone redistributes without permission then they can make them take it down. Some of these guys sell them so anything that infringes on them making a few bucks on it by someone else redistributing the photo is seen as a violation of copyright.

Kind of like if you wrote a book and someone else copied it word for word and published it....it would make you a bit upset right?



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