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Supernova 2012aw M95 Galaxy....WOW!

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posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by elevenaugust

There's also a short video where we can see the supernovae appears:

Flickr


In the Flickr video i noticed something strange. There is a light(star?) on the far right of the frame that disappears and another one that appears next to M95. Did anyone else notice this or know what those 2 objects could be?




posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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to think you're looking millions of years in the past when you watch this even with your eyes... just imagine...

imagine if we could travel faster than the speed of light. lets say we travel way faster than the speed of light and land on some distant distant planet or what have you. if our optics were good enough to see earth in very great detail, we'd be watching HISTORY of humanity with our eyes. maybe even our OWN life and history. sorta like read-only time travel.

which makes me think, if faster-than-light travel were possible im sure some other intelligence out there have already discovered it, and could watch (if they wanted to, assuming hyper advanced optics and photon-sensitive organs (eyes)) human history

*strokes beard*



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by HawkeyeNation
That is awesome! The end of days may come now as I have finally seen my first Super Nova


I'm still waiting on my Chicago Cubs to win a World Series... The day that happens, be very very worried....

edit on 22-3-2012 by jhn7537 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 11:11 PM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 

Outstanding! I do so love it when the real science arrives here on ATS. Thank you for bringing it. I see these more frequently nowadays and they spark questions. From where we sit, this was long ago and so tiny far away. I wondered how long these last and so I googled the question:

Supernova Duration

There is no single answer to your question.
In a sense, the explosion itself is over within a matter of seconds.

But the envelope of the dying star is expelled with such speed that, when it ploughs into the interstellar gas, it is heated to millions of degrees and remain bright in X-rays for tens of thousands of years.

BANG! Who says creation doesn't like fireworks? All the stuff we are made of comes from these.



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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I just hope they continue to explode 38 million light years away and no closer.

We wouldn't even know it was coming, we would just vaporize.



posted on Mar, 24 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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ty I enjoyed this useful post, cheers



posted on Mar, 24 2012 @ 10:57 PM
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Originally posted by tkwasny
How many trillions of lives within effective (deadly) range have been terminated. When is our number up likewise?

Maybe, maybe not. Depends what sort of region of space it exploded in. If it's a Type 2, there's a good chance it was formed in a big nebula that is a star forming region populated mostly with young stars. Unless some older star with a long life strayed into this region, most of the stars nearby are probably also young (like just a few million years old), so they wouldn't have life on planets around them.

If anything, this sort of explosion might lead to the collapse of some other local, big wad of gas into a new star and the new elements created by this supernova could seed that new star and solar system with the raw materials it needs to create life many millions of years in the future. Had their not been supernovae before our own sun was formed creating elements that went into the formation of the Earth, then we wouldn't be here. Supernovae can be seen as both destructive and creative forces. We wouldn't exist but for the explosion of some prior star before our own formed. Supernovae can also spark new star creation because the force of the blast compresses gasses around them to the point where they collapse into new stars. Odds are very good that is how our own sun formed.


Originally posted by lacrimaererum
2012aw supernova.

so we all came from the stars. (sorry if you a bible person just ignore me)

we did actually all come form the stars out there.

so this supernova happened 38 million years ago. so maybe we are witnessing the supernova that eventually created us. yes, the earth formed 4-5billion years ago but maybe our dust just arrived here 37 odd million years ago?

As we now witness it go supernova from 38million years ago and make the connection we too will now go 'supernova' and evolve to the next stage of our exsistance.

get ready to go supernova people!!!

No. Whatever supernova created the dust that we are made from happened in our own galaxy and it happened before our sun was formed. This is too far away and whatever elements this explosion created are traveling much slower than the light that we are now seeing. It's quite possible some other star or stars and planets have formed near to where this supernova happened, and those planets might only exist because of the elements it created.



Originally posted by Wolf001

Originally posted by elevenaugust

There's also a short video where we can see the supernovae appears:

Flickr


In the Flickr video i noticed something strange. There is a light(star?) on the far right of the frame that disappears and another one that appears next to M95. Did anyone else notice this or know what those 2 objects could be?

Each one of those frames in that video represents a 10 minute exposure. A lot of those little "stars" and objects popping in and out could be satellites or maybe other objects flying in our atmosphere between the telescope and the object (bugs, birds...).


Originally posted by yourmaker
I just hope they continue to explode 38 million light years away and no closer.

We wouldn't even know it was coming, we would just vaporize.

They can and they will happen in our galaxy probably once every 30 years or so. Betelgeuse will eventually go supernova, probably sometime in the next million years or so. It could happen in our lifetimes, even, we really don't know exactly when it will happen. It's very near to the end of its lifespan and is only maybe 500 or 600 light years away. When it happens it will be as bright as the full moon, but most likely harmless to us.
edit on 3/24/2012 by LifeInDeath because: (no reason given)



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