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The impossible photo!!

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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:00 AM
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Could it be possible to find this moon/rainbow configuration somewhere on Earth?



The answer is clearly NO! But do you know why??







Such examples are rare on the Net, however I found another one:



OPOD
edit on 15-3-2012 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:14 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


How absolutely beautiful. That's the image to call it a night with and put my school work away for a few hours. What a great set of images. ...Hmm.. Great wallpaper...
S/F!



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:30 AM
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Aaaahhh...thank you for those......rainbows are fascinating and don't always adhere to the science!

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:45 AM
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Another fascinating thread friend!



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:49 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


So your are saying that the crescent shape should be pointing towards the left in your first pic?

That is really strange, are you sure that the information you posted is correct or do you mean the image is faked?
edit on 15-3-2012 by bastardo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:57 AM
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Originally posted by bastardo
reply to post by elevenaugust
 


So your are saying that the crescent shape should be pointing towards the left in your first pic?

That is really strange, are you sure that the information you posted is correct or do you mean the image is faked?
edit on 15-3-2012 by bastardo because: (no reason given)

No, what is impossible here is to find a crescent moon near a rainbow. You can only have a full or gibbous moon close to it.

Please, read my full above post as it's fully explained how it works!



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 05:11 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Never mind, I misinterpreted that computer image. I thought there was a mystery here but you are just showing this stuff.

So the first pic is photoshopped?
edit on 15-3-2012 by bastardo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by bastardo
reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Never mind, I misinterpreted that computer image. I thought there was a mystery here but you are just showing this stuff.

So the first pic is photoshopped?
edit on 15-3-2012 by bastardo because: (no reason given)

Yes, it a (badly!!) job I've done just to show the "impossible photo".



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 05:50 AM
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I would love to catch the moon as it passed behind a rainbow through my scope...
Sort of like mother nature providing her own filters!
Great pics.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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1108 your threads are always awesome!

Not only that, but truely educational! A rainbow/moon combo, whoever thought about the whole celestial mechanics of it in the first place is the kind of person we as a people should be making our 'popstars'. This kind of stuff had it been taught to me in school would have kept me far more focused!

(I was also interested today in learning our planetary axis tilt actually changes over time between around 22 to 24 degrees! I guess it was silly of me now I look back to think our solar sailing was a set in stone ellipse. Instead we're slowly bobbing (thousands of years bobs...) around the inky heavens)
edit on 15-3-2012 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 06:40 AM
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Does this mean ill finally find my pot of gold at the end of one of them damn things
.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 07:13 AM
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Why is it 'impossible'? Improbable yes, not impossible.




The fundamental process at work in a rainbow is refraction -- the "bending" of light. Light bends -- or more accurately, changes directions -- when it travels from one medium to another. This happens because light travels at different speeds in different mediums.


science.howstuffworks.com...

Have you never seen the Sun and Moon out at the same time in the morning/evening, of course its possible.
edit on 15-3-2012 by abominatonofdesolation because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 07:22 AM
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reply to post by abominatonofdesolation
 


Because a rainbow is always at a certain angle and postion, it is impossible for the moon to appear next to it in the moonphase it has in the first pic, because of the moons position and angle.

According to the OP, so it is not possible if his information is correct. I see no reason to think it is not correct.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 07:25 AM
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I'd like to see this so I'm booking my seat for later. I'll also check out your previous threads since you have such a reputation. Thanks man.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 07:29 AM
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reply to post by bastardo
 


It's not correct, read my link, all it takes is water vapour dense enough to retract the light. So basically if there's light and water vapour dense enough, you get a rainbow, so why couldn't that happen with the moon there?



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 07:40 AM
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reply to post by abominatonofdesolation
 


Your link doesn´t delve deeper into it that´s all.

Read the OP, a rainbow happens at a 42 degree radius centered directly opposite from the sun. Remember this is a rainbow in the sky, so it is always dependant on the position of the sun wich makesd it impossible for the moon to be in the picture like that, cause it has a steady position relative to the sun.


Drops of rainwater can refract and disperse light in the same basic way as a prism. In the right conditions, this refraction forms rainbows. In the next section, we'll find out how this happens.


You can create your own rainbow anywhere with a prism and a lightsource or a garden hose spray in the sun, but only at the same relative angles.

Someone correct me if I´m wrong.


edit on 15-3-2012 by bastardo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by bastardo
 


The OP is wrong, here's more to disprove it....



Q. Can you see a rainbow at night? A. Yes, the moon is bright enough to produce a rainbow, and while rare, people do see it. We all just have to get out more at night. Since the moon is not near as bright as the sun, the rainbow produced by the moon at night is much weaker than a rainbow produced by the sun during the day. Our eyes see dim things as black and white, not in colour. So a night "moonbow" will look gray not colourful.


optics.kulgun.net...

Google is your friend when used CORRECTLY.

The only thing relative to the angle is your eye.
edit on 15-3-2012 by abominatonofdesolation because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 08:31 AM
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reply to post by abominatonofdesolation
 


Ok, since you are displaying a little attitude I´ll join in and say that you are completely missing the point. You can google all you want but it doesn´t help if you are unable to grasp the concept of the op.

All he is saying that the moon can never be next to a rainbow while in that PHASE.


Q. Can you see a rainbow at night? A. Yes, the moon is bright enough to produce a rainbow, and while rare, people do see it. We all just have to get out more at night. Since the moon is not near as bright as the sun, the rainbow produced by the moon at night is much weaker than a rainbow produced by the sun during the day. Our eyes see dim things as black and white, not in colour. So a night "moonbow" will look gray not colourful.


Totally irrelevant. Where did I or the OP claim that that was not possible and how does it debunk the Op´s claim?

It doesn´t at all.

You have no idea what you are talking about and the person that starred your post is an idiot.

Do you even know what a moon phase is? Apperently not, since it´s the part you are failing miserably at.




edit on 15-3-2012 by bastardo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 08:38 AM
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No you're the one who doesn't have a clue, moon phase means nothing in regards to rainbows. The only things which do mean something, is light, the right angle for your eye to catch it, and water vapour or something else which refracts the light. Come on guys this is pre-school physics.
FYI I know enough about moon phases/cycles to know it has no bearing on the conception of a rainbow, and to claim that it does is preposterous.
edit on 15-3-2012 by abominatonofdesolation because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 08:50 AM
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Originally posted by abominatonofdesolation
No you're the one who doesn't have a clue, moon phase means nothing in regards to rainbows. The only things which do mean something, is light, the right angle for your eye to catch it, and water vapour or something else which refracts the light. Come on guys this is pre-school physics.


Yet you are consistently misrepresenting the OP´s claims.

Noone is saying that moon phase means anything in regards to rainbows.

The moon nor its phase has any impact on a rainbow. please qoute the part where the OP said that.

He said that you will never see the moon in that phase next to a rainbow.

I´ll try one more time.

The moon has a location in relation to the sun.

In some phases of the moon it has a different location relative to the sun.

A rainbow in the sky always has the same location in relation to the sun.

Therefore the moon in that particular phase can never be next to a rainbow. The rainbow will always form, just not in that part of the sky where the moon is in that phase.

This was my last try mister pre school.


edit on 15-3-2012 by bastardo because: (no reason given)



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