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Camping stoves and heat/light packs - Bug Out Bag Stuff

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posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:40 AM
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These "bug out" threads useless as they tend to attract boneheads teemnig with testosterone who shout down anyone actually trying to suggest anything useful.

Most survivalist experts are actually utterly clueless.

What one needs most are:-

- Place to go. The best way to survive a nuclear bomb blast or a massive disease is to not be there when it happens.
- Unobtrusive means of transport to get there.
- Giegercounter - All food COULD be utterlylethal and you would never know. Medcom.com have the best as they are light and run on AA or AAA batteries.
- Battery recharger.
-




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by beautyndissonance
Go preorder a Biolite Camp Stove. It is all you will ever need to survive in a SHTF scenario. You can cook on it without fuel (uses anything that can be burned), recharge usb devices, use it for heat and light (can be transported while burning), and it only weighs about 2 pounds.


Thats pretty cool. I will probably get one when they get to my local hardware store. Canadian tire. Sooner or later they will have them or one like it.

I remember when I was a kid, and the flashlights were 2 pounds, and had 2 C batteries, and they lasted 20 minutes and were not rechargeable. If you wanted an hour of light, you had to go for the 6 volt lantern.
Or a coleman lantern with naptha or some fuel.

But now, as I said, the little light on the bottom of my candle lantern, with a couple watch batteries, lasts 40 hours and is just as bright as the old flashlights.

If you don't have a candle lantern though, you should get one.

edit on 20-1-2012 by Rocketman7 because: lasts 40 hours not 150 edit



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Here's what I don't don't get: if the s has truly htf, what usb device will you need to charge? What usb device will be important to your survival?

In a survival situation, charging an ipod is going to be the least of my worries...


Well actually if the shtf I will use my phone, not for communication, but for entertainment, as I have many shows, and movies loaded onto it, in HD no less.
But for survival it would be nice to be able to charge AA/AAA for use in flashlights, am radios or other devices. My ham radio also can take AA cells, so I need that as well. If you are looking for top notch AA/AAA I would get eneloop, as they can sit in storage for years without dying.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:42 AM
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reply to post by Rocketman7
 


The cats LOVE my cherry chapstick. Oh, and found out where the urban legend started. It's a real product. Found it on a drugstore ad with the story behind the name. www.drugstore.com... No chicken poo in it - just the name.

Everybody gave me packs of the cherry chapstick for Christmas. NOW, I know what ELSE I can do with it. I have enough dryer lint and chapstick to eat for the rest of my life now.

I'm not throwing away the hibachi though - too portable.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:48 AM
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Originally posted by Freezer

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Here's what I don't don't get: if the s has truly htf, what usb device will you need to charge? What usb device will be important to your survival?

In a survival situation, charging an ipod is going to be the least of my worries...


Well actually if the shtf I will use my phone, not for communication, but for entertainment, as I have many shows, and movies loaded onto it, in HD no less.
But for survival it would be nice to be able to charge AA/AAA for use in flashlights, am radios or other devices. My ham radio also can take AA cells, so I need that as well. If you are looking for top notch AA/AAA I would get eneloop, as they can sit in storage for years without dying.
entertainment...fair enough.

As for the lights, it seems like making more work than needed. Between long life LED lights that can last hundreds to thoudands of hours on one set of batteries, and self-charging shake LED that recharge themselves, it seems silly to carry extra equipment to charge flashlights.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:49 AM
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My most efficient fire starter is the vasoline (petroleum jelly) and cotton ball mix.

Place a hand full of cotton balls in a zip lock baggie, add about a half cup of vasoline to the cotton balls. Seal the zip lock and place some where warm for 10 minutes or so (it helps make the vasolive even easir to distribute evenly through the cotton balls. After the vasoline/cotton balls are warm just kneed them around in the baggiee until the vasoline is evenly distributed.

I take this cotton/petro jelly mix and stuff as much as I can into an Altoids tin and seal it up.

a full altoids tin will last you for about three weeks of starting fires nightly, it only takes a small amount of cotton to start ( about the size of a marble) a fire, and even works well with the blast matches (which I highly recommend) and flint/steel fire starters.


Altoids tins are wonderful cheap little storage containers for survival material..

Check out you tube for some videos on what can be stuffed into one for survival use.


edit on 20-1-2012 by mileysubet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:51 AM
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Originally posted by ballisticmousse
These "bug out" threads useless as they tend to attract boneheads teemnig with testosterone who shout down anyone actually trying to suggest anything useful.

Most survivalist experts are actually utterly clueless.

What one needs most are:-

- Place to go. The best way to survive a nuclear bomb blast or a massive disease is to not be there when it happens.
- Unobtrusive means of transport to get there.
- Giegercounter - All food COULD be utterlylethal and you would never know. Medcom.com have the best as they are light and run on AA or AAA batteries.
- Battery recharger.
-


Thats all true. YOu need to have a plan. And you need to know about fallout and all the rest.
But you know if you have a good bug out bag, that will increase your chances of survival.

Someone in this thread mentioned a new bio-fuel battery charger. That charges USB devices.
It can charge an ereader. As well as your modern flashlights.

I bought a couple of these. One attack flashlight. Don't laugh, they are Chinese ok?

Attack Flashlight

It is so bright and flashes such that any attacker would be blinded, and then you poke them or something with it.
And I bought one even brighter, with no attack end on it.

And they are bright. As bright as a projector bulb, and last for 30,000 hours.

I mean bright. You cannot look at it without damaging your eyes.

You could maybe cook an egg, by shining light on it. That bright.
Ok I am exaggerating, but equal to 900 candles.

edit on 20-1-2012 by Rocketman7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:52 AM
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reply to post by mileysubet
 


That's a good one, but dryer lint works better than cotton. And it needn't be vasoline- it can be any petrolium based lubricant.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:57 AM
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Originally posted by mileysubet
My most efficient fire starter is the vasoline (petroleum jelly) and cotton ball mix.

Place a hand full of cotton balls in a zip lock baggie, add about a half cup of vasoline to the cotton balls. Seal the zip lock and place some where warm for 10 minutes or so (it helps make the vasolive even easir to distribute evenly through the cotton balls. After the vasoline/cotton balls are warm just kneed them around in the baggiee until the vasoline is evenly distributed.

I take this cotton/petro jelly mix and stuff as much as I can into an Altoids tin and seal it up.

a full altoids tin will last you for about three weeks of starting fires nightly, it only takes a small amount of cotton to start ( about the size of a marble) a fire, and even works well with the blast matches (which I highly recommend) and flint/steel fire starters.


Altoids tins are wonderful cheap little storage containers for survival material..

Check out you tube for some videos on what can be stuffed into one for survival use.


edit on 20-1-2012 by mileysubet because: (no reason given)


Hey I wonder if I can put vaseline inside of this keychain match ...instead of lighter fluid. Maybe the fuel would last even longer.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:58 AM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 



I have about 20 survival/homesteading related books on my kindle, with my droid bionic's kindle app (books stored on phone) as backup. I also have the ability to recharge it for quite some time. The Goal Zero Nomad 7 solar panel puts out a ridiculous amount of voltage for its small size. Roomie and I tested mine last week. 14.98 volts in full sunlight. That voltage remained stable for at least 65 degrees in either direction before it budged.

Even when the Li-Ion battery gives up I still have the ability to use it via power pack. Shipped dry ATV batteries FTW.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:58 AM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
reply to post by mileysubet
 


That's a good one, but dryer lint works better than cotton. And it needn't be vasoline- it can be any petrolium based lubricant.


But vaseline has so many other uses.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:01 AM
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Originally posted by netwarrior
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 



I have about 20 survival/homesteading related books on my kindle, with my droid bionic's kindle app (books stored on phone) as backup. I also have the ability to recharge it for quite some time. The Goal Zero Nomad 7 solar panel puts out a ridiculous amount of voltage for its small size. Roomie and I tested mine last week. 14.98 volts in full sunlight. That voltage remained stable for at least 65 degrees in either direction before it budged.

Even when the Li-Ion battery gives up I still have the ability to use it via power pack. Shipped dry ATV batteries FTW.


Fantastic.

I live on the Wet Coast though. I bought a crank radio flashlight with solar panel on it. 6 months sitting in a window, battery is still dead.

I have a USB spare battery for Ipod and the like, with solar, and it wouldn't charge either.

So for southern Vancouver Island, where I am, its warm for Canada, but it just doesn't get much sun.

You would need large panels here. But new options are showing up all the time, like that bio-fuel stove battery charger.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:02 AM
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Treply to post by netwarrior
 


That's fantastic, althought I would suggest one or two military field manuals in hard copy are a better way to go than a kindle. Even if you can manage to keep it charhes, it will inevitably be destroyed by the elements. Electronics are not something to rely on, in a survival situation.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:03 AM
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Originally posted by ballisticmousse
These "bug out" threads useless as they tend to attract boneheads teemnig with testosterone who shout down anyone actually trying to suggest anything useful.

Most survivalist experts are actually utterly clueless.

What one needs most are:-

- Place to go. The best way to survive a nuclear bomb blast or a massive disease is to not be there when it happens.
- Unobtrusive means of transport to get there.
- Giegercounter - All food COULD be utterlylethal and you would never know. Medcom.com have the best as they are light and run on AA or AAA batteries.
- Battery recharger.
-


I find your assessment of the ATS survival forums to be rather baseless and wholly inaccurate.

Most people here are usually helpful and polite, and I have seen very few "Boneheads" here in the survival forums.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:04 AM
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Originally posted by Rocketman7

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
reply to post by mileysubet
 


That's a good one, but dryer lint works better than cotton. And it needn't be vasoline- it can be any petrolium based lubricant.


But vaseline has so many other uses.

true, but chapstick can be used for every one of those uses, and is easier to pack and carry.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Treply to post by netwarrior
 


That's fantastic, althought I would suggest one or two military field manuals in hard copy are a better way to go than a kindle. Even if you can manage to keep it charhes, it will inevitably be destroyed by the elements. Electronics are not something to rely on, in a survival situation.


Your spot on about the electronics being destroyed in the elements in a survival situation, survival situations are rarely anything like going out camping on the weekend

When it is time (if there ever is one) it is going to be ugly and you re going to need to move fast, lugging around solar panels and large flashlights and other superfluousness electronic gear is going to wear you out fast. Besides the fact that most of these devices are not made for the rigors of the outdoors The last thing on your mind is going to be entertainment, believe me your going to have plenty on your mind to keep you entertained, beside you shouldn't let yourself be distracted in a survival situation, your life and and others with you depend on all your sense be tuned to your surroundings not a movie or music.




I would highly recommend checking out all the great (and not so great) videos on you tube to see what people are putting in their survival bags. There are alot of great ideas out there to consider.
edit on 20-1-2012 by mileysubet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:14 AM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by Freezer

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Here's what I don't don't get: if the s has truly htf, what usb device will you need to charge? What usb device will be important to your survival?

In a survival situation, charging an ipod is going to be the least of my worries...


Well actually if the shtf I will use my phone, not for communication, but for entertainment, as I have many shows, and movies loaded onto it, in HD no less.
But for survival it would be nice to be able to charge AA/AAA for use in flashlights, am radios or other devices. My ham radio also can take AA cells, so I need that as well. If you are looking for top notch AA/AAA I would get eneloop, as they can sit in storage for years without dying.
entertainment...fair enough.

As for the lights, it seems like making more work than needed. Between long life LED lights that can last hundreds to thoudands of hours on one set of batteries, and self-charging shake LED that recharge themselves, it seems silly to carry extra equipment to charge flashlights.



I looked at eneloop batteries, but I went for these instead...
Ultrafire

15 years they will hold a charge. Take 20 minutes in a usb charger. One of them for each of the flashlights I bought.
And I bought a few spare batteries.

Now I haven't road tested them camping yet, but if they live up to their warranty claims, then I am a happy camper.


Ox

posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:17 AM
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This is probably the easiest thing to make and use.

www.campstovewizard.com...

I have something similar in my B.O.B. with a bottle of denatured alcohol for fuel, I also have petroleum jelly and cotton balls for emergency ignition if I have to build a fire without any type of kindling around..



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:21 AM
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Originally posted by mileysubet

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Treply to post by netwarrior
 


That's fantastic, althought I would suggest one or two military field manuals in hard copy are a better way to go than a kindle. Even if you can manage to keep it charhes, it will inevitably be destroyed by the elements. Electronics are not something to rely on, in a survival situation.


Your spot on about the electronics being destroyed in the elements in a survival situation, survival situations are rarely anything like going out camping on the weekend

When it is time (if there ever is one) it is going to be ugly and you re going to need to move fast, lugging around solar panels and large flashlights and other superfluousness electronic gear is going to wear you out fast. Besides the fact that most of these devices are not made for the rigors of the outdoors The last thing on your mind is going to be entertainment, believe me your going to have plenty on your mind to keep you entertained, beside you shouldn't let yourself be distracted in a survival situation, your life and and others with you depend on all your sense be tuned to your surroundings not a movie or music.


I would highly recommend checking out all the great (and not so great) videos on you tube to see what people are putting in their survival bags. There are alot of great ideas out there to consider.
edit on 20-1-2012 by mileysubet because: (no reason given)


Consider this though.
You will not be going outside.

104 nuclear reactors, and that many spent fuel ponds in America.

1000 in the Northern Hemisphere. Fukishima, affected America, and it was across the Pacific ocean.

Drinking water 181 times over the legal limit



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:25 AM
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reply to post by Rocketman7
 


The top-shelf solar panels are leaps and bounds above those kind of PV cells in those rechargeable flashlights. That's what led me to the Nomad 7 panel. I have a cheap solar battery charger. 1.5-3v in full sun.

I've yet to test overcast weather power output. I'll have to test that out.

To the other guy that said that about packing the bugout bag? I been doing this awhile and I, like many others, came to the conclusion that indefinite survival out of a backpack is impossible. Even the pioneers trekking across the continent had to stop in for supplies every now and then. I'm not talking about bugout, i'm talking about an INCH scenario. I'm Never Coming Home. I'm working towards the ability to be a mobile homestead. Seeds, tools, some food to get me over the first winter, first aid, etc. Right about the time I get that completed It'll be time to buy the homestead property and start construction on my strawbale house...provided we don't blow ourselves up before I get out of school and start working next year.

I'm still going to keep the mobile ability in reserve. You never know when you gotta just GTFO.



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